Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,059 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 14% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Inside Amy Schumer: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Pauly D Project: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1572
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1572
1572 tv reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For such a quick-witted comedy, the eight episode commentaries aren't as sharp as you'd expect, and Carell is entirely absent. But some three hours of deleted scenes--funnier takes of already hilarious sequences, beefed-up stories for the supporting cast--compensate.
  1. This season, The West Wing has finally figured out what it's about: an administration trying to hold on to power, thwart its foes, and accomplish its mission.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  2. You'll be pining for more once it's over. [1 Mar 2013, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. Inoculated against hype and its backlash on the strength of fortified plotting and unshowy acting, ER continues to make good on its initial stylistic breakthroughs. Which is to say, all the speedy razzle-dazzle hasn't gone lame yet.
  4. It's a blast to watch Deschanel walk the line between broad comedy and complex emotion with growing scientific precision.
  5. L&O's been having a sleek, swift season.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Bialik manages to steal scenes from Parsons as if she's been with the crew since, well, the big bang.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Tommy Lee Jones masterfully directs Cormac McCarthy's ferocious two-man play.
  6. One of TV's few rock-solid sitcoms. ... The paradox of W&G -- its marvel and its trap -- is that it revolves endlessly around the same four people (Eric McCormack's Will, Messing's Grace, Hayes' Jack, and Megan Mullally's swizzle-stick-sarcastic Karen) in essentially the same locale: Will and Grace's apartment, with occasional visits to Grace's interior-design office.
  7. If you're looking for the season's smartest, most comfy and engaging new thriller, 'Sisco' is it.
  8. The premise sounds vaguely familiar... But The Tunnel still delivers on its nasty twists. [17 Jun 2016, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. Breaking Bad has, in short, everything you could want from an hour-long show: suspense, laughs, danger, and poignance.
  10. The new season pops with all the visual energy of the first. [4 May 2012, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  11. This season—the show’s fifth--is filled with just as much teen-centric drama as ever, but it’s all more urgent and more compelling thanks to the characters’ impending separation from one another.
  12. The setup is slow, but the show captures shadowy Coulson, sarcastic Grant (Brett Dalton), combat vet Melinda May (Ming-Na Wen), and Fitz (Iain De Caestecker) and Simmons (Elizabeth Henstridge), whose superpower is Britishness. Bonus points for wry dialogue by co-creator Joss Whedon. [20/27 Sep 2013, p.144]
  13. Last season, it took me a while to get used to the shambling pace imposed by the show's improv strategy, but by now, Curb's inventive riffing is like good jazz music.
  14. If Team Forte can sustain the ingenuity, surprises, and craftsmanship, The Last Man on Earth, a profoundly funny comedy about the least funny of things--loneliness--might live long and prosper.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This production is suffused with emotion. [11 Mar 2016, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  15. In a recent interview, Apatow said that he cast Undeclared before writing the pilot, which may be a key reason why the show is so cohesive: Apatow and his staff had specific acting rhythms in mind, resulting in a show that, right from the pilot, radiates a sure sense of each character's quirks.
  16. It's a beautiful mess. Don't miss it. [29 Nov 2013, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  17. This very British series is refreshing in that it's actually about the food; watching a dozen hopefuls bake up trifles while maintaining their dignity turns out to be a delight. [26 Dec 2014/2 Jan 2015, p.113]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. The show was created by Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, but it's Soderbergh's vision, from the brilliant but unusual score (minimalist electronic music) to the wry camera angles (the series opens on Owen's shoes as he lounges in a brothel). For a period piece, it's strikingly contemporary--and quite gory, although the surgery scenes never feel gratuitous.
  19. The duo's hilariously awkward chemistry get even stronger abroad... and in prison. [26 Dec 2014/2 Jan 2015, p.112]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  20. Most TV series feel the need to up the ante in their second season, to prove the first one wasn't a fluke. Justified proceeds with such assurance, however, that it can maintain a cool, witty serenity that only enhances its tough-guy drama.
  21. Maybe it's the fact that Rach is six months pregnant (and looks like she ate a bagel, at most), but the crazed stylist's show has an extra bolt of energy this season.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The show's best tension comes from the awesome/awful self-awareness that plagues the directors as they attempt to make a film while being very much filmed themselves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    MG is wonderfully absurd and the supporting cast is satisfyingly straight-faced. [21 Mar 2008, p.53]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  22. We never thought we'd laugh out loud with a laugh track again. [23 Sep 2005, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. Freshly modern... Thanks to a superb Vincent Franklin. [17/24 Apr 2015, p.104]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  24. Joyful and insidery, the competition wholeheartedly embraces the freaks and geeks who made Glee a phenom to begin with.
  25. True Blood is, if anything, faster, sleeker, more vicious, more fun that it already was. Yum-yum.
  26. The access is such that you almost wish every member of Congress had a TV crew. [25 Aug 2006, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. Season openers don't get much more incendiary: There are severed feet, a ''beef'' between rival Armenian, Mexican, and Salvadoran gangs, and a murder committed by another member of Vic's Strike Team.
  28. Showrunner/star Josh Thomas has only gotten better at mixing mordant one-liners with nuanced emotional drama. [16 Oct 2015]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  29. Based on Luc Besson's 1999 film La Femme Nikita (and mercifully, less cheesy than the 1997-2001 Peta Wilson TV Series), this promising adaptation follows the same premise. [10 Sep 2010, p.83]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  30. Of the whole prime-time array of 'reality' shows, only one keeps me coming back week after week: Fox's low-tech, low-key Cops. ... Cops' cameras keep a blessedly level gaze; a TV show that doesn't look up to cops or down on them is rare indeed.
  31. This excellent, Robert Redford-narrated look at both the Watergate scandal and the film it inspired backs up the comic's [Louis C.K.'s] assertion about politics never being more insane.
  32. Bernie Mac ... is as violent, foulmouthed, mildly homophobic, clueless, and manipulative as ever.
  33. The science/star-power combo lends both a sense of urgency and a cinematic sparkle. [11 Apr 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Notebook showcases Radcliffe's gift for deadpan humor, while Jon Hamm plays the doctor's older self with melancholy gravity, warning him off the dope. [22/29 Aug 2014, p.100]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Six seasons in, and Sunny continues to be a shining example of how to expertly combine smart political commentary with the basest of humor.
  34. The series doesn't have a plot so much as a beautifully tangled web of deception, cruelty, and faded hopes. ... There are times when EZ Streets seems like the world's longest Bruce Springsteen video.
  35. Every crime--murder, bank robbery, changing lanes without signaling--is a mini-masterpiece of L.A. noir. But the real draw is the cast.
  36. This sitcom is simply infectious. [4 Jul 2014, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  37. What makes this season so good is that the Heffernans' luck has been so bad.
  38. Murder has no basis in the reality of the legal system, and just like Scandal, there are probably two too many characters to have to care about. But it manages to continuously elevate the dramatic stakes and navigate the ever-evolving relationships of its principals while rarely allowing itself to become narratively untethered.
  39. Jay Roach, who directed the Austin Powers films and won an Emmy for the HBO political drama Recount, knows from parody and keeps his actors from slipping into it.
  40. What lifts Eastbound & Down away from mere crudball humor is McBride's ongoing love affair with the lower middle class.
  41. It’s [Shoshanna's] and Jessa’s plot lines--and a surprisingly tender one involving the blossoming romance between Elijah (Andrew Rannells) and an Anderson Cooper-like newsman played by guest star Corey Stoll in a multi-episode arc--that feel like the season’s new emotional center.... It’s still pretty great to watch them flail--in all their messy, misguided, ridiculous glory--towards something like it [womanhood].
  42. The high-IQ ensemble cracks the code with rapid-fire jokes on geek culture and frantic tension, striking a balance that continues to make the show a gutsy look at how success requires failing again... and again... and again. [22/29 Apr 2016, p.104]
  43. Ultimately, the reason 'The Shield' is one of the best police dramas going isn't just its spiderweb plots, the claustrophobic you're-stuck-with-us camera work, or its antihero, although Chiklis -- who won a well-deserved Emmy two years back -- is just as spooky and weirdly amiable as ever. It's the fact that the program regularly yields even its main characters to baleful Fate.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Happy Halloween. [28 Oct 2005, p.79]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  44. The contestants are highly entertaining. [2 Feb 2007, p.116]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  45. The show is at its manic best when a room is packed with loud, opinionated voices, all trying to be heard and protect their jobs; in season 5, the story pivots to bring the core group back together.
  46. Modern Family works because it does something the network sitcom hasn't managed in years: It offers a comic equation for almost every audience segment, while never blanding out the characters for mass consumption.
  47. Prison Break has the dark social hierarchies of Oz and the clever inventions of Escape From Alcatraz.
  48. Being Mary Jane suffers from the occasional misstep, but it's also a lot like Mary Jane herself: relatable, passionate and complex. [30 Jan/6 Feb 2015, p.122]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  49. It's incredibly moving to watch him finally become comfortable in his own skin.
  50. Beyond the sloggy Mistah Bates! scandal, which still gets too much attention, it's a relief to find no secret rapes or pregnancy shame (yet) this season. It's time for these proper ladies to have some proper fun.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where her movie overstayed its welcome, the quick-shot format of TV works beautifully. The result is haphazard, amoral, ridiculous, wildly offensive...and, you know, totally hilarious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The show immediately bursts at the seems with personality. [16 Nov 2007, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  51. Season 2 is just as brainy and twisty and kinky [as season 1], and it ratchets up the suspense by making the threats to our "heroes" even more personal.
  52. In its sizzling fourth season, Teen Wolf has simply never been this good.
  53. Brooklyn Bridge is beguiling, simultaneously the warmest and most intelligent new show of the season. It's also a vindication of artistic control in the TV industry.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    You know men who devote an absurd amount of time to mocking one another? I do, and I call them ''me and my friends.'' Maybe that's why I so enjoyed this sitcom about a group of thirtysomething pals and their fantasy football league....Or maybe it's just darn funny.
  54. The most visceral moments emerge from Buscemi's conversations with his former colleagues and lifelong friends at Engine Co. 55, rendering vivid and tearful accounts of tragedies.
  55. Between [Peter Griffin's] hiring of a "penis butler," his purchase of a solid-gold tuxedo at the "nonsense store," and his riff on the "dreadfulness" of True Blood, it's easy to forgive the plot for being as old as the hills.
  56. Almost preposterously enjoyable. [16 Jun 2006, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There's blood, drama, and edge-of-your-seat action--no zombies necessary.
  57. Silly, weird, occasionally sweet, and always very, very funny, 'Scrubs,' which just wrapped its third season, is one of the best comedies on TV.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the series could get preachy, it's tempered, and above all, the whole thing's just a lot of fun.
  58. [Its] quality has, if anything, improved in its second season.
  59. It returns with an emotional and surprising (hint: you'll never look at icicles the same way) premiere.
  60. A gleeful, fizzy race through Hollywood.
  61. One of the addictive things about Damages is its ability to work what initially seems to be a peripheral character like Olyphant's into the series' core plot in a startling way. All credit is due to the show's creators--brothers Glenn and Todd A. Kessler and Daniel Zelman--who wrote the first two episodes with smoothly intricate plotting and bursts of melodrama that rarely spill over the top.
  62. Without the annoying melodrama [like "Desperate Housewives"], you become more emotionally hooked by the lives of the four complex and original characters.
  63. Horton Foote's 1953 teleplay proves as durable as ever in this transfer of 2013's hit Broadway revival. Cicely Tyson is as fiercely magnetic on a small screen. [7 Mar 2014, p.62]
  64. I can assert that the series has benefited artistically from the business decision that concluded last season. In shuttering Sterling Cooper and launching SCDP, the show is immediately jazzed by the renewed energy and willfulness that often accompanies a start-up.
  65. It's a midlife triumph, a series that takes a well-worn theme and makes it unpredictable, freshly funny, and sometimes moving.
  66. [Helen] Mirren is terrific — hard-boiled but never macho; always suggesting a sort of bitter humor. Some of the scenes between Mirren and her enlightened teddy bear of a boyfriend (Tom Wilkinson) are soggy, but most of the time, Prime Suspect ... is wonderfully tense entertainment.
  67. The largely improvised series is a jangly American version of 'The Office,' with its best comedy revolving around race, gracelessness, despair, and a glorious lack of self-awareness, courtesy of the kinds of outsize characters who inhabit the typical workplace.
  68. As a profane peek into current showbiz, Entourage is excellent, dirty fun.
  69. Like a James Brown show, the result is both generously proportioned and extremely tight.
  70. A holiday special done right. [30 Nov 2007, p.126]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  71. This reality show tracks, with admirable and hilarious straight-facedness, the follicularly oriented infighting that plagues Beard Team USA (a name I will never tire of writing), as well as their attempt to dethrone the presumably more regimented Germans as planet Earth's top whisker warriors.
  72. While Seduced and Abandoned may be hard to categorize, it is easy to sum up: amazing.
  73. The Game is next-level entertainment, courtesy of smart scripts and a cast of finely drawn characters.
  74. Everyone served as a good reminder that, after the aerial dance numbers of Peter Pan Live! and the elaborate sets of The Sound of Music Live!, no flashy TV musical gimmicks can match the power of raw talent.
  75. The series' brilliant conceit is that enemies are often sane and rational, and many good guys and gals are obsessed, flawed, and ruthless.
  76. Brooklyn South is a high-intensity street cop show, familiar yet fresh, as if Hill Street Blues had been sampled and remixed by a televisual Sean ''Puffy'' Combs.
  77. Ken Burns' documentary about the "black blizzards" that swept across the Great Plains during the 1930s is at once rigorously sourced and heartbreakingly emotional.
  78. Talking heads such as Daniel Okrent are eloquently pithy. And narrator Peter Coyote is as soothing as a tumbler of fine Scotch.
  79. The show's energetic fearlessness in depicting someone who is fearful in her loneliness gives Ally McBeal an overriding purpose. The result is irresistible television, whether you experience it as a sexual-differences safari or as a blueprint for your own life.
  80. Prepare for gullet slicing, blood spurting, cop-versus-cop conflict, and more blood spurting. We can't get enough.
  81. Its second season has so far been fabulous — even funnier and scarier than the first.
  82. Here's a show that knows how to dive into its final season.
  83. Kill pays both you and its subjects two solid compliments: It doesn't scream ''Take heed: This is a work of art!'' And it lets you form your own opinions about what its social commentary is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The first episode is as thrilling as it is hilarious. [9 Jan 2015, p.74]
  84. [A] terrific second season of this industry-set sitcom. [17/24 Aug 2012, p.109]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  85. Ellen, now in its fifth season, keeps getting funnier.

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