Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,936 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 I'm Not There.
Lowest review score: 0 Crime and Punishment in Suburbia
Score distribution:
5936 movie reviews
  1. The calm poetry of the cinematography offsets the mess of the politics to stunning effect.
  2. The Cove is the rare documentary specifically designed as a thriller.
  3. If this is the sound of a new generation, then it may be the first generation cautious enough to embrace friendship as mightier than love.
  4. This is the rare movie that gets you to fall in love with characters you don't even like.
  5. A riveting and unexpectedly inspiring essay on the peace that comes from shared physical and mental concentration.
  6. Bridges' guileless performance makes this piquant little indie tale of country music, redemption, and the love of a pretty younger woman such a sad-song charmer.
  7. There’s Glen Powell as Finn, the endearing loquacious smoothie; there’s Juston Street as Jay, the psycho loose-cannon fireballer; and Wyatt (son of Kurt) Russell as Willoughby, the older, sage-like stoner who quotes Carl Sagan after ripping bong hits.
  8. As De Palma shows us, whether he’s got two more films left in him or two dozen — Holy Mackerel — what a career!
  9. There are moments in A Little Princess--particularly Cuaron's Indian play-within-the-play, which is nearly avant-garde in its conception--when you may just want to clap from pleasure. My advice to you is: Go ahead, you're a grown-up. [26 May 26 1995]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  10. The notion of meta has never been diddled more mega than in this giddy Möbius strip of a movie, a contrivance so whizzy and clever that even when it tangles at the end, murked like swampy southwestern Florida itself, the stumble has quotation marks around it.
  11. As visual spectacle, Avatar is indelible, but as a movie it all but evaporates as you watch it.
  12. But Solondz also creates keen portraits of the participating characters in Dawn's daily drama. (The only downside: The drama veers unsteadily toward outlandishness.)
  13. The title embraces the richness of Kechiche's beautiful film, which captures the rhythms of displacement and hardship, the bond of family meals, and even the daily routines of the magnificent women who are part of Slimane's life.
  14. It would be hard to imagine a movie about drugs, depravity, and all-around bad behavior more electrifying than Trainspotting.
  15. With its virtuoso tomfoolery, Fantastic Mr. Fox is like a homegrown Wallace and Gromit caper. To Wes Anderson: More, please!
  16. Although it shares a bitter interest in slum desperation with last year's Brazilian-underbelly docudrama ''City of God,'' Bus 174 pulls ahead, I think, by not confusing cinematic pizzazz with the content of misery.
  17. The chattering smarty-pants who ran the U.S. government on "The West Wing" are slow talkers compared with the motormouthed and hilariously imperfect power elite in the brainy British comedy In the Loop.
  18. Feels delightfully organic, eccentrically rambling, the found artistic collage of a woman who herself loves to collect.
  19. Fierce, loving, and electric, this movie's got bite as well as bark.
  20. The movie is a rare uncensored postcard from a ruined place, a document at once depressing and hideously beautiful that sketches the real hardships of trampled people -- specifically women -- with authority and compelling simplicity.
  21. With this heartbreaking yet hopeful new documentary about his life’s work, Salgado shares the stories behind these split-second black-and-white moments, giving them even more dimension.
  22. Has the resonance to stand not just as a terrific cartoon but as an emotionally pungent movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Kineticism and suspense, combined with strongly conceived characters....Made Cameron a talent to watch. [13 Jan 1995, p. 67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  23. As he did in his striking 2005 first feature film, "Man Push Cart," about a Pakistani street vendor in New York, perceptive indie filmmaker Ramin Bahrani looks at what others overlook and finds drama in everyday details.
  24. The writer-director, Peter Sollett, cast the film with kids from his own neighborhood, who give themselves over to the camera with a spirit of improvised play that morphs into vivid, layered acting.
  25. '71
    It’s only March, but this could be 2015’s most invigorating directorial debut.
  26. What makes this chillingly creepy little black-magic folk tale work so beautifully is its evocative sense of time and place.
  27. As an achievement in macabre visual wizardry, Tim Burton's Corpse Bride has to be reckoned some sort of marvel.
  28. A fascinating and in many ways tragic documentary, takes us back to one of the high-water marks of the apes-are-people-too era.
  29. As gorgeously animated as any of his previous movies, Wind has Miyazaki trading in his more fantastical impulses for contemplative, old-fashioned drama and period detail.

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