Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,966 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Run Lola Run
Lowest review score: 0 Say It Isn't So
Score distribution:
5966 movie reviews
  1. An unctuous rom-com that runs its characters through every plastic cliché of a pre-Oscar McConaughey vehicle, ultimately causing us to root against the vacuous couple and their predetermined happy ending.
  2. A fractious fiasco: whiplash camera movement set to raging blasts of death metal, a story so incoherent it made me wish I was watching, instead, the collected outtakes from Van Helsing.
  3. The movie lacks even the misplaced fervor of obsession. It's lifeless kitsch.
  4. What's on screen is lazy, second-rate, phoned-in -- a heist in which it's the audience whose pockets have been picked.
  5. I wish I could say that the film is half as intriguing as it sounds, but A Woman, a Gun... lacks the Coen brothers' precision, their diabolical game-board cleverness. It's a remake in shaggy outline only.
  6. Most of this just seems, you know, so three years ago, so "Bourne" again.
  7. This kingdom really should be forbidden.
  8. Parts of the film play like the world's slowest and most insensitive reality show (Who Wants to Be an Octogenarian?).
  9. It's the sign of an empty, depressing experience when the only tension is over Bob's choice to use a power drill or a weed whacker for his next kill.
  10. So badly told that it ends up dissecting a corruption that exudes from nowhere but itself.
  11. In every way dreadful.
  12. A notorious opinion divider last year at Cannes, Battle in Heaven is less about heaven or battle, or hell on earth, or the soul of Mexico, and all too much about gawking. And so, for all the ''shock'' of the movie's clinical carnality, this battle is lost.
  13. This Debbie Downer of a drama is a bitter slog.
  14. Back to the Future Part III has that same sort of studio back-lot clunkiness. Only this time it's the audience that gets conked — by the sheer desperation of the whole enterprise.
  15. The film is proof that if you repackage the classics (in this case, Dickens) for the youth market in an era of MTV dislocation, what you get, in essence, is postmodern Cliffs Notes with an alt-rock soundtrack.
  16. The gooey sanctity of the bond between fathers and sons all but nullify Jackson's zesty performance.
  17. An appalling, jaw-dropping movie that will cause serious nightmares.
  18. Three stories by the guy who wrote Trainspotting, banged and smashed into a film by Paul McGuigan with none of Trainspotting's charm and all its grotesquerie.
  19. You may go into Flatliners hoping for a psychedelic mindblower, but the film is about as exciting as staring at a lava lamp for two hours.
  20. Antonio Banderas is a charming and talented man, but in Take the Lead he lays on the old-world panache so thick - the accent, the flowery courtliness, the romance of romance - that he comes off like Dracula's metrosexual cousin.
  21. McCarthy's rawhide has become movie Naugahyde, a substance unknown in literature or in nature.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, it's impossible to tell from this confused mess (costarring Jakes as himself) what that message is.
  22. A magical-realist sitcom war farce that ends up being about nothing but its own slovenly smugness.
  23. Director Ken Kwapis fills the movie with feeble references to Planet of the Apes and King Kong that don’t amuse adults and sail over the heads of tykes who snicker most at the raspberries Dunston blows at anyone he meets.
  24. Director Sean Ellis has a lovely eye, but he's set the film in his blind spot. Not only can't he distinguish between art and porn, savoring and wallowing, universal truths and exhausted clichés -- he doesn't even seem interested in these distinctions.
  25. Insistently sullen, nihilistic, and successful to the point of smugness at transmitting buzzkill, Art School Confidential is the second collaboration between art-house cartoonist Daniel Clowes and director Terry Zwigoff.
  26. I don't know if it's ickier to assume that writer-director Brad Silberling (Moonlight Mile) thinks the culture-clash jokes he pushes in 10 Items or Less are charming because they're earnest, or because they're tongue-in-cheek. Either way, this sale is void.
  27. In terms of content and meaningfulness, Terrence Malick’s Song to Song is the cinematic equivalent of a Trump press conference. Incoherent, disconnected, self-interrupting, obsessed with pointless minutiae and crammed full of odd, limp stabs at profundity from a closed-off man in his 70s who apparently has no ability to edit or accept constructive criticism.
  28. None of the faux icons comes close to being a character. Instead, they are contrasted with a group of nuns who skydive without parachutes. Could this possibly be a metaphor for Korine's filmmaking? It certainly goes splat.
  29. You can expect a lot of shredding and gurgling. 30 Days of Night is relentless, but it's also relentlessly one-note.

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