Exclaim's Scores

  • Music
For 2,978 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 A Sailor's Guide to Earth
Lowest review score: 10 Excuse My French
Score distribution:
2978 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Tracks like the rambling "Old Things," the hoedown-lite "Bluebird" and perhaps the most precious song about outlaw life, "Private Property," shoot for middle-of-the-road appreciation, sucking out any grit from the recording.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His latest LP, the 13-song Pressure, is a quality collection of songs that core fans will undoubtedly embrace.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like the 6 God's "playlist," this mixtape has no higher purpose than to let its creators run wild, showcasing their prodigious talents with frequent moments of pop brilliance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    We can say that the real Slim Shady does show up and prove himself on a handful of Revival's songs, but many of the more 'noteworthy' moments are buried under a mountain of contradictions and cringe-worthy attempts at shock value.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As anarchic as it may seem on first listen, No_One Every Really Dies smoothes out a little more with each play. It's a strong comeback for the daring trio.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Outside of nostalgia, though, much of the work still feels necessary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All Together Now is a surprisingly and satisfyingly listenable collection of compositions that weren't necessarily recorded for this type of public consumption.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the EP's virtues, that's a lot of excess fluff for a collection with just five tracks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Material Control is an invigorating yet familiar release from the band and by far their angriest and densest music to date.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Many avant-garde instrumental albums exist to strictly craft a mood, and Tom Rogerson and Brian Eno somehow seem to merge these moods, sounds and themes together effortlessly and radiantly on Finding Shore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Radio Silence is a jazzy, soulful call to action, a think-piece and a middle-finger to the trolls who claim he fell off; you can still find his name "in the middle of equality."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even though Post Self isn't exactly what was expected, it's a masterful release from two musicians who seem to be incapable of creating anything short of exquisite.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though he enthusiastically pushes the boundaries of his sound and image on his most eclectic album yet, Miguel also takes care to make each of its tracks insatiably catchy and breezily fun.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Weighing of the Heart plays out as the soundtrack to a forgotten '90s B movie; novel, but not great.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is self-deprecation and honesty to In an Open Field that combines with musical prowess to form a thoroughly enjoyable, thoughtful record. Few writers possess the melodic ability and communicative skill that Nicholas Krgovich does. He remains one of the finest pop songwriters along the coast.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While musically, the tracks can sometimes bleed into each other, sounding perhaps too similar, this album is meant to be consumed in order as a whole. Birdie sets a solid foundation for Slaughter Beach, Dog's future.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With the cohesive and captivating Morning After, dvsn have used soothing vocals and layered beats to paint a sonic portrait of modern R&B.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Experience neither recaptures past glories nor forges a new way forward, and while it's better than its predecessor, it nevertheless captures the sound of a legacy rock band stuck in neutral.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The more transparent mix dovetails nicely with the album's themes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Utopia feels like both a journey and a collection of statements that define and affirm who Björk is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At first listen, the album is scattered and slightly exhausting; it takes several attempts to make sense of everything you're hearing, and some listeners may run out of the patience required to dissect it all. Those with a longer attention span, though, will find SYRE a very promising debut that offers new delight with every play.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Soul of a Woman is a more than worthy farewell by one of the hardest working and talented women show business has ever known.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although many songs lack the fire and passion that defined his earlier work, with the exception of the race-relation lyrical content of "What's My Name?" and the growling "Snake Behind Glass," Four Lost Souls is simply unlike anything else in Jon Langford's sprawling discography.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the kind of odd, idiosyncratic record that makes collaboration so compelling; whether or not it appeals to you, there's absolutely no way you've heard a metal release quite like it this year.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a delicate, cautious demonstration, but Mechanics of Dominion is a bold, gripping and brilliantly nuanced addition to Esmerine's gorgeous catalogue, swelling with hope and brimming with energy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The pacing of Rest and the length of its songs make it a grower of an album that, over time, ensconces listeners in the sonic layers and personal lyricism of Gainsbourg.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If All I Was Was Black is another late-career winner from Staples, an album that perfectly captures her gentle, loving and elegant way of making a political statement without sacrificing the passion she's built her career upon.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nihilistic chugging riffs permeate the album from beginning to end, thundering away and drilling a particular tempo into your head. But this repetition isn't served by the sort of groove that previously was a keystone to Electric Wizard's sound.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    1989 fans will breathe a sigh of relief when "I Did Something Bad" kicks in, though, which starts off a string of shiny pop songs that not only feel like a more natural progression from the last album, but improve upon each listen in that sneaky way Swift songs tend to do. ... The moments on Reputation that Swift stans appreciate the most are likely the ones casual listeners will be quickest to dismiss.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Arpo forges lush soundscapes by drawing on ASMR techniques, layering textures over the arpeggiated hooks that drive the record. A saxophone player himself, Call Super subtly peppers hazy woodwind tones throughout, elevating the record's otherwise eclectic collage of electronic soundscapes.