indieWIRE's Scores

  • Movies
For 601 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 78% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 14.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 The Look of Silence
Lowest review score: 0 In Secret
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 601
601 movie reviews
  1. Having laid out the scenario, Brandt drags it through the motions of a tired procedural.
  2. W.E. is less outright bad than underwhelming; if the director were unknown, it would hardly deserve notice. Like her first film, the 2008 "Filth and Wisdom," it suffers from countless storytelling flaws.
  3. As ghost stories go, this one's done just well enough to provide reminders of how it has been done better.
  4. By virtue of its style and high stakes scenario, End of Watch is impressively tense, but then so are most episodes of "COPS," which don't suffer from the forced melodrama found here.
  5. The mystical allure of this long-awaited "lesbian werewolf movie" turns out to have more value than the real thing.
  6. It's a period piece composed of familiar pieces, none of which have much to say beyond surface elements that have been explored countless times before. Using a typical coming-of-age mold, Chase turns cultural ephemera into formula.
  7. This is still a pretty familiar journey that's easier to pity than hate -- much like Caplan's character.
  8. The problem with Outside Satan is that the filmmaker has remained faithful to expectations without enlivening them. It's a curious exercise unworthy of his expertise, but then he may realize as much.
  9. Small touches point to a slightly better movie hiding beneath most of the routine, particularly the respectable finale that stops just short of the clichéd resolution expected of it. On the whole, however, The Way, Way Back dances to a tune we've heard too many times before.
  10. Marred by excessive sentiment, it has a buoyancy and a hook that makes it stand out -- but they're elements that would help it kill on Broadway (as it already has on the Australian stage) a lot better than it does onscreen.
  11. Call it a Shakespearean catharsis or just call it a lark -- either way, the movie represents Whedon's least essential work, regardless of the material's inherent comedic inspiration.
  12. The movie is constantly at war with attempts to provide an honest portrayal, almost as if its subject were reaching beyond the grave to steer any negativity back in the direction of a hagiography.
  13. Though ultimately unsuccessful, it valiant reaches for a funky, wild critique of hedonistic sluggards wandering through society with no clear direction. But more than anything else, it delivers Keanu in his element.
  14. While certainly the most dazzling Superman movie to hit the big screen, the 143-minute Man of Steel is also the longest, and it only justifies that heft because it leaves room to keep the effects coming.
  15. Wan seems to critique the third act failings of The Conjuring during the alarmingly superior first half.
  16. This tame exercise never quite jives and sometimes just bombs with one-note melodrama, but always maintains Thornton's conviction about the material.
  17. While not without its touching moments, "Mister and Pete" is inevitably defeated by its own good intentions.
  18. Go For Sisters, like the filmmaker's previous features "Amigo" and "Honeydripper," sustains a feeble premise with richly defined characters and strong performances, yielding an underwhelming but nonetheless sustainable viewing experience.
  19. In between the meandering exchanges lies an unquestionably thoughtful interrogation of a broken system.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Barker-Froyland's intention was clearly to make Song One all about music and how it can bring people together. But the result is all about Anne.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    While The Trip to Italy offers all the pleasures of a posh holiday accompanied by two of the most inventive comedians today, the improvisation here lacks the total unexpectedness that the first enjoyed.
  20. Smothered by its lighthearted approach, The Monuments Men attempts to make a grand statement about the valiance of dying for the sake of art, but fails to create it.
  21. A loud, visually assaultive assemblage of genre tropes as technically accomplished as it is difficult to watch, "The Strange Color of Your Body's Tears" has plenty to impress while simultaneously offering so little.
  22. By its later scenes, Chef only finds respite from its bland qualities through the scrumptious-looking dishes constantly on display. As self-indulgent vanity projects go, this one's pretty innocuous, if only because it's always easy on the eyes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The numerous belly laughs are undermined by jarring flashes of darkness that never organically sync with the plot.
  23. Like its tattered setting, The Rover is scattered with intriguing ideas never successfully fleshed out.
  24. It’s a dazzling showcase of fantasy-based filmmaking in the 21st century that also manages a feeble attempt at injecting feminist politics into an antiquated narrative. Yet its eventual climax strains from the obviousness of these efforts.
  25. Predominantly a failure of tone, Horns has plenty of admirable traits and yet dooms itself from the outset. It's an admirable conceit stuffed into far less subtle material.
  26. Magic in the Moonlight belongs to the pool of lesser Allen comedies, yet Firth and Emma Stone — as the alleged necromancer Sophie Baker, the object of Stanley's scrutiny and eventually his affections — bring all the zany energy they can muster.
  27. Rosewater is lacking in sophistication, but its attitude is infectious.

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