Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,610 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Night Of
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 870
  2. Negative: 0 out of 870
870 tv reviews
  1. Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.
  2. It’s a professionalized version of Rae's homely original that maintains her voice while sharpening everything that surrounds and supports it.
  3. Destitution has never been quite as appealing as it is in The Durrells in Corfu, the latest slice of picturesque Anglophilia from “Masterpiece.” The six-episode series is escapist entertainment in the most literal sense.
  4. It's not the greatest thing since sliced bread but rather a well-made sort of sliced bread, a thing you have had before but prepared with quality ingredients by bakers who know their business.
  5. Berlin Station is a tense, terse thriller--good-looking but never fussy, balancing character and plot in satisfying proportions, a new suit cut to classic lines.
  6. That the two men are in their 30s makes their perseverance more poignant--to somewhat overstate the case--and that they have no money places them in a long and honorable line of comedians who cannot put two cents together to buy a glass of seltzer.
  7. If the targets and tone of her comedy were clearly flavored by her “Daily Show” roots, Bee’s voice is completely her own.... The only bad thing about the premier of Full Frontal was its brevity.
  8. The only major kink in Northern Exposure is its tendency to have Fleischman and the others expose their flaws only to finish each episode by doing the good and right thing, as if guided by some invisible magic wand. Otherwise, this is magical stuff that deserves a permanent spot on the CBS schedule. [12 July 1990, p.10]
    • Los Angeles Times
  9. It does not go deep. And yet in its moments, Graves can be quite persuasive, even moving. (It can be corny too, but corn can work.) Growling and grumbling like a spokesperson for phlegm as he takes Graves from childishness to youthfulness, Nolte finds everything touching in his character, and makes you feel it too.
  10. Despite a bizarre courtroom sequence that strains credibility early in the episode, this is a very good start for Special Victims Unit, which promises to be a solid cop drama capable of occasionally stretching toward greatness.
  11. Murder in the First, a masterfully paced balance of tricky whodunit and character development, seems to have benefited from both Bochco's hits and the misses, as well as the cable-led experimentation with shorter seasons.
  12. With the rest of the cast hitting the same high notes as Margulies and the script, The Good Wife promises to be that Holy Grail of television: a good criminal procedural that barely disguises the insightful, multilayered human drama that lies beneath.
  13. An emotional, necessarily freaky but surprisingly logical and altogether satisfying story and, one hopes, a reset for future seasons.
  14. Though his [Carlton Cuse's] version is not quite as eerie and enigmatic as the French version, it's still pretty dang eerie and enigmatic, particularly for those watching the story unfold for the first time.
  15. Dexter is a weekly marvel of writing, acting and conceit.
  16. Given a boatload of fine performances and an attractive milieu, it remains very much worth watching even when it feels like the writers are depending on your inattention or forcing their characters to act improbably in the service of a puzzle-plot that at times feels held together with string and tape and white glue.
  17. The leads are all marvelous, with a complementary elemental division of attitudes: Kemper, air; Burrell, fire; Kane, earth; and Krakowski, water, as I reckon it. They rise to the occasion and make it an event.
  18. The first episode took a little while to seem real, but, as Holder would say, I was feeling it before long. Like Linden, I was drawn back in.
  19. An amusing, highly promising light drama from the WB about mother-daughter bonding that is tender, warm and loving in a natural way without heaping on the schmaltz. [4 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  20. The show thus far feels more observational than story-driven; it relies on our desire to listen to Rock talk. And we do want to listen, because Rock is hilarious.
  21. Bel and her staff are no longer young Turks shaking up the fusty old BBC; now they are, for better or worse, part of the mainstream news media, forced to question their own motivations as well as those of the Establishment. In the first two episodes anyway, this makes for a more sophisticated storytelling, a drama of adults who must take responsibility for decisions of the mind as well as the heart.
  22. A complicated, and occasionally whimsical, series of tactics lend the 90-minute premiere the wide-open, yet tensely meticulous feel of a good heist film.
  23. You will laugh, you will cry and if it seems a bit treacly, it is.
  24. It is funny and disturbing in exactly the manner and proportions one would expect from his earlier works.
  25. Certainly Fellowes has developed a formula. A solid, dependable and successful formula, with "dependable" being just a few shades warmer than "predictable."
  26. Grounded in parental reality, it's funny and promises to be funnier. The characters, though presented in very broad strokes, have lots of room for shading.
  27. McKenzie's best moments are all spent in his [new partner Harvey Bullock's (Donal Logue)] company. Bullock loosens him up even as Bullock puts him off, signaling that their uneasy partnership will become an easier one. He performs a similar service to the whole production, bringing it down to earth, keeping it from becoming too much of a comic-book gizmo with its wash of rain grays and rot rusts and spittoon bronzes and Frank Miller lighting effects.
  28. If the vagueness may irritate fans of the first book/film, it works well for the second, making this story a bit more open-ended and universal.
  29. "I'm finally getting to do the exact kind of show that I've always wanted to do.... What that show is, I have no idea." An unkind commentator might be tempted to second that thought, given "Chelsea's" first-night, new-colt wobbles, but it's pointless to be too hard on any talk show on its premiere, even when the host has a long track record. ... Overall, it was an appealing debut.
  30. Once the action leaves the overly Maxfield Parrish-ized world of magic trees and drooping pregnant princesses, things pick up considerably.

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