Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,469 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Smash: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Painkiller Jane: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 781
  2. Negative: 0 out of 781
781 tv reviews
  1. The new series, to judge by the two opening hours, is better balanced and plays more to the players' strengths.
  2. Copper has come to entertain, not to educate, and it discharges that duty well.
  3. You could resist it, really, as you should be able to resist all television, unless you have been completely assimilated into the matrix. But you'd be missing some sparky fun. Submit.
  4. The show is indeed diverting. Nothing surprising, but pretty consistently interesting and as easy to watch as any invented procedural.
  5. In a world without cable dramas, Chicago Fire would be considered television at its more compelling and realistic. As it is, it walks the line between shameless entertainment--hot guys, hot girls, the fires within, the fires without--and intelligent storytelling.
  6. It is tonally odd yet quite likable.
  7. Wilmore was off to a good start Monday night--a little muted, which is his style anyway, and a little tentative, as would be expected. But he landed some punches and clearly had more than a little fun.
  8. Once you get past the relatively stiff opening episode and everyone relaxes and starts having fun, "Hustle" is an undemanding good time that manages to rack your nerves even when you know better.
  9. If it doesn't match "Battlestar" for ambition or poetry or sparkling dialogue--to judge by the three hours available for review--it's well-made, solidly scary and disturbing all the same.
  10. The script can seem both a little precious and a little obvious at times, dropping references to Pandora's box, the golem, Einstein's definition of insanity and Schrödinger's cat. But all in all, it works.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As you might expect from a program that stars 40 kids--at least some of whom will say the darndest things--it is pretty delightful
  11. It's not perfect, but it certainly is different, so why not just enjoy the ride?
  12. [Christian] is in rare form here. Which is a good thing since the show's success or failure rests solely on his dramatic agility and general appeal.
  13. At least initially, don't expect balance in other areas, either, for one of the religious right characters showing up tonight is a ruthless fanatic, the other a toady. That's politics, in Hollywood as well as Washington, D.C. [22 Sept 1999, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  14. Better Off Ted is funny, it's just not as funny as it might be, or should be, or, with any luck, will be.
  15. The closer you are to living with an addict or an addiction, the more essential you'll find this viewing, obviously, but the less personally involved will still find much of scientific and human interest.
  16. Equally happy to consider the joys of rum raisin and the need for ritualized violence, Wayward Pines veers, at times, toward a self-consciousness one might call Fever Dream Camp. But mostly it's good, creepy fun, a round-the-fire story of a series that may turn out to be about something bigger than it seems.
  17. The premiere is nonetheless diverting, if not immediately impressive, and there are nice rhythms and sharp asides and some other things to be said in its favor: It's a show about the working class - or perhaps better put, the barely surviving entrepreneurial class - that is actually about work.
  18. Watching "My Name Is Earl," you feel like you're in a movie, or at least a movie trailer. In ways more good than bad, it's immediately comprehensible.
  19. Some will feel right at home here right away; and some will be in bed by then. For the rest, it's worth investing in a few episodes to get used to the milieu and the music; though the humor stays rough, the show feels sunnier as the company grows more familiar.
  20. The show's episodic nature, however, limits the attachment viewers can form for the teams (and also, mercifully, the level of celebrity these folks can later attain). But there is something to be said for brevity.
  21. Whether all, or indeed any, of the subjects here are actually "iconoclasts" is debatable -- "independent" is more like it -- but the title is meant to signal that this is something hipper and smarter and less conventionally angled than a Barbara Walters special and, at least on the basis of the two episodes available for review, it is.
  22. Eventually the mood relaxes, even as the slapstick amps up, and what may prove to be a charming comedy begins to emerge.
  23. "What's really going on?" quickly becomes as big a question as "What will happen next?" as episodes jammed with plot remain often maddeningly opaque.... The stars give the show life--Holloway and Callies play an easily likable married couple with an increasingly complicated relationship, and Jacobson shines greasily as spokesman for the new overlords--but the wall gives the show meaning and potential relevance.
  24. It is so well-assembled and well-played that its contrivances and clichés play like something reasonably close to life.
  25. The show isn't brilliant, but it is audaciously alive.
  26. "Longford," perhaps, could as easily have been a stage play — a taut, four- or five-person one. But the filmmakers artfully weave in documentary footage of the period to remind us of the personal suffering and public hand-wringing the killers caused.
  27. The Honorable Woman is great, in the most traditional sense of the word, which makes its flaws all the more frustrating. The first three episodes are often overwhelmed by soundtrack and studded with near-still-life shots meant, apparently, to offset the shootouts and establish the High Art factor of the series.
  28. As marred and derivative as "ER" is, however, there's something quite seductive about this series.
  29. The series is at its most convincing, and most beautiful, at its most static. When the show bursts into action, or insists upon making its characters intense and extraordinary--some of them fictionally take credit for real-world medical advances and inventions--it grows, paradoxically, proportionally less interesting.

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