Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,662 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Office (UK): Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Cavemen: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 908
  2. Negative: 0 out of 908
908 tv reviews
  1. Bette and Joan isn’t as deep or all-encompassing as “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” but it’s addictive all the same.
  2. Tyler Labine makes a most excellent wacky bearded sidekick, and Rick Gonzalez and Valarie Rae Miller round out the Scooby Gang. Auteur of slackerdom Kevin Smith ("Clerks") directed the pilot, which maintains a nice fairy tale tone even as it stresses the banality of the infernal.
  3. Garbus, director of the Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning "The Farm: Angola, USA," fills in many of the blanks--to an impressive extent, given the obsessively guarded privacy of her subject--in a film that is both meditative and exciting, like the game it concerns, and mercilessly penetrating even as it reserves judgment on a man whose outrageousness practically demands it.
  4. As television it's excellent--beautifully mounted, movingly played and only mildly melodramatic.
  5. All in all, this is a dynamic, addictive rendition of a complicated novel that catches the spirit of Dickens' "roaring streets" where "the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted and chafed, and made their usual uproar."
  6. It is less a portrait of two combustible stars, played with empathy and breathtaking control by Dominic West and Helena Bonham Carter, as it is a surprisingly thoughtful excavation of a love that is both undeniable and untenable.
  7. Without making any great claims for the show's depth, I do sense a desire behind the sensation and soap to investigate something significant, if deceptively simple: how life changes in a moment.
  8. The value of the series, then, is its, well, weight, its relentless attempt to remind us of what we know, to connect many important dots and clear away the emotional and cultural fog that often blurs discussions about obesity, and to offer hope in the form of personal stories, regional projects and past success.
  9. This is not just whistling Dixie. Although basically comic, and not without moments of beauty and relief, the series is a dream in which you escape one trap only to fall into another, elude your pursuer only to find him somehow before you, and where hope springs eternal only so it can be eternally snatched away. But you should watch it, anyway, and take your time.
  10. It is striking more for its form than its contents, which are familiar. ... But it looks and feels like nothing else on TV.
  11. At once more modest and more ambitious than its predecessor; more focused on detail and yet more expansive. It is also excruciatingly funny, with an emphasis on excruciating.
  12. It's [Jessica Jones'] superhumanity, rather than her superpowers, that makes the show so riveting.
  13. [Writer/director/voice of Cleric] Steve Purcell's comic timing is splendid, as is his staging of the action scenes.
  14. The play, and the production, might have been better served by rolling a few cameras into the theater, but I know that isn't how people like to do these things.
  15. The film as a whole is a strange case of mostly excellent parts that make an overlong and tedious whole.
  16. At one moment, the series seems set to satisfy expectations, the next to undercut them, and the next to undercut the undercutting. Its endgame twists may frustrate some viewers, but they are meaningful and not arbitrary.
  17. This time around everyone, Byrne in particular, moves with an air of confidence that allows you to keep your eyes on the knives being juggled in the air rather than the person doing the juggling. Which is exactly where you want the audience's eyes to be when you're pulling off a con, or a show like Damages.
  18. It's a conclusion that seemed to me both contrived and honest, if that makes any sense, and it left me disturbed, though not, as Doctor Who often has, a sobbing wreck.
  19. An amusing, highly promising light drama from the WB about mother-daughter bonding that is tender, warm and loving in a natural way without heaping on the schmaltz. [4 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  20. What makes it so engaging is not that the series finds anything new to twist, but that it works so well with and within the strictures of the well-thumbed genres it combines in equal parts: spy thriller, murder mystery, backstage drama, triangular romance.
  21. The first episode may be a bit rocky in the beginning, what with the reintroduction of characters and story lines, but the second season of Damages promises to be even better than the first.
  22. Unlike many series--especially cable series--and despite the propensity of some family members to take undue advantage of Cam's new good fortune, the show is not broadly cynical about people or institutions, which makes it easy to like, despite its sometimes wobbly tone and occasional clumsy construction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bell does such a good job playing the world-weary Veronica that she manages to get away with voice-over lines like "I'm no longer that girl" and "The detective in me knew something was wrong" without sounding silly. She channels the charisma, smarts and frustration of Angela Chase, Claire Danes' character in "My So-Called Life." [22 Sept 2004, p.E12]
    • Los Angeles Times
  23. The three-hour-plus documentary is thorough, thoughtful and authoritative, an experience that honors the multiple complexities of this situation and, best of all, helps us feel what these directors felt as they went forward into what was very much terra incognita.
  24. Even when the cut comes fast, they stay elegant; the images all register. We cut into conversations in the middle, suggesting talk that has been going on awhile and might go on longer. Scenes show as much as they need to, and just a little more, without seeming interrupted.
  25. You will laugh, you will cry and if it seems a bit treacly, it is.
  26. More a sketch than a thorough retelling--though still recommended as such--and as balanced as you can be about the scandal given the facts, the film begins at the end, or just before it, with the remarkable, once much-bootlegged footage of Nixon preparing to resign.
  27. It's the miraculous simplicity of creating something from nothing that makes Runway endlessly watchable.
  28. Artistically, it may be an unnecessary appendix, but I'm not complaining. More pie? I will make room somehow.
  29. Funny and wickedly weird.

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