Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,955 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Spider-Man 2
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever It Takes
Score distribution:
2,955 movie reviews
  1. The Dreamers argues that life must be lived, not dreamt. But it also remembers the confounding pleasures of dreaming with your eyes wide open.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Thanks to myriad animators, the characters cavort, laugh and struggle against stunning backdrops, from lush jungles to cascading waterfalls. Groovy? Absolutely.
    • Miami Herald
  2. Cotillard, who earned a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her performance, plays the character as a woman hanging on by the barest of threads.
  3. By the end, Turtles Can Fly becomes a lyrical and heartbreaking reminder of the human toll of war.
  4. The casting of Hiddleston and Swinton was a stroke of genius: They emanate a particular sort of cool only they seem privy to, accentuating their alienation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Tupac Amaru Shakur is riveting in Tupac: Resurrection. The rapper is a compelling, charismatic hero: articulate, well-read, politically radical, and movie-star handsome to boot (he in fact starred in Poetic Justice and Juice). Make that, was riveting.
  5. This is an intentionally fanciful, gossamer movie, extremely personal and heartfelt, influenced in equal parts by Michelangelo Antonioni (although never so elusive) and Gus Van Sant (just not quite so self-conscious).
  6. Monsieur Lazhar doesn't send you home depressed. Instead, the film leaves you hopeful, and even exhilarated, that even the most painful wounds can sometimes heal.
  7. Leigh is obviously a major talent of the English film resurgence, which may already have peaked but nonetheless offers hopes of its own. His loose way of making films -- the wandering camera, the scenes that seem to invent themselves as they go along -- somehow accommodates a genuine comic intelligence, which usually requires the tightest of controls. [2 June 1989, p.7]
    • Miami Herald
  8. Waltz With Bashir isn't only a harrowing anti-war plea, it is also an eloquent and deeply moving argument that it is critical to never forget human atrocity, lest the past be repeated.
  9. There's nothing about United 93 that qualifies as entertainment in the traditional sense: It is an unpleasant, wrenching experience, which is just as it should be.
  10. A big, bold movie that gets at undeniable truths about the way no one, no matter how powerful, is immune from manipulation.
  11. One of the scariest films I've seen in ages, although I cannot in all honesty explain exactly what the movie is about.
  12. By the end of the movie, when all your questions have been answered, you're left with the exhilarating high of having been manipulated by a gifted artist in a diabolically dark mood.
  13. Broken English takes 30 minutes to do what most romantic comedies manage with a simple montage. That's a good thing, by the way.
  14. This is a romantic comedy that makes the concept of romantic comedies appealing again -- that reminds you how resonant and transporting they can be when they're done right.
  15. Almodóvar has never been shy about experimenting with plot structure, but Bad Education is the closest he's ever come to a metamovie, the sort of self-reflective, hall-of-mirrors contraption on which Charlie Kaufman has built his career.
  16. By the end, the movie has pulled off a small miracle: You become absorbed in the lives of these people for who they are and not what they own.
  17. A fiendishly subtle horror movie, a goosebump-inducing exercise in suspense that uses your own imagination to scare you silly.
  18. Saraband portrays a sad vision of aging, yet the film is never depressing. For those inclined to search for psychological twists, the film offers plenty of Freudian situations capable of provoking lengthy discussions.
  19. The Grandmaster sets aside traditional story structure in its last 15 minutes and becomes one of the filmmaker’s free-form visual poems, suffused with melancholy and compassion.
  20. Impossible to resist.
  21. Remarkably astute and devastatingly funny.
    • Miami Herald
  22. The film is far from a downer. If anything, more than any of the films in the trilogy, this one may be the most hopeful - and the most affecting.
  23. It's a good, old-fashioned North Pole adventure.
  24. A wild buckle-up-and-blast-off adventure that plunges every corner of kids' favorite subject.
  25. Pay attention, Michael Bay: This is what thrilling summer movies look like.
  26. The story of Paranoid Park may center on an extreme and unusual case, but it's Van Sant's understanding of -- and compassion for -- the hell of growing up that makes the film such a profound and lasting pleasure.
  27. You feel terribly sad and angry at May's foolishness. Yet with so many emotions at hand, The Mother never fails to engage.
  28. It's a small victory, but Punch-Drunk Love knows how to reap epic delight from the most precious of details.

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