Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,816 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Inside Llewyn Davis
Lowest review score: 0 Eye of the Beholder
Score distribution:
2,816 movie reviews
  1. It leaves you feeling exhilarated at the invigorating power a well-told story, no matter its subject, can have. If you like Harry Potter, you will love this movie. If you don't like Harry Potter, you will still love this movie.
  2. What you come to see are the strokes of a visual master. You will not be disappointed.
  3. Brilliant, suspenseful, absolutely riveting film.
  4. One of the best things about 12 Years a Slave is that McQueen renders all the characters with the same depth and complexity as his protagonist.
  5. Has the sort of richness and dimension that are the hallmarks of master storytellers at work.
  6. Gravity is a celebration of the primal pleasure of movies: It shows you things you’ve never seen before, transports you out of the theater and out of your head, tricks you into believing what’s happening on the screen is happening to you.
  7. Delivers the heady, rib-tickling rush of an action picture, and it gradually builds to an emotional wallop that blindsides you.
  8. Lester managed to come up with a movie that not only holds together as a film but one that has proven timeless and rewards repeat viewings.
  9. Maya is as consumed with finding bin Laden as Jake Gyllenhaal was obsessed with finding a serial killer in "Zodiac," only he was doing it as a hobby.
  10. The movie has such a profound and compassionate understanding of human behavior, family ties and the way ordinary people respond when they're forced into a moral quandary, I can't imagine anyone not being transfixed by it.
  11. The film is far from a downer. If anything, more than any of the films in the trilogy, this one may be the most hopeful - and the most affecting.
  12. Offers a ride worth taking -- an excursion through a fantastical pop universe that is pure, enchanting magic. Try it; you'll like it.
  13. Like every war before it, the U.S. invasion of Iraq has generated its share of movies. But The Hurt Locker is the first of them that can properly be called a masterpiece.
  14. This is a beautiful movie.
  15. An extraordinary movie that ruffled many feathers when it first came out. Almost 40 years later, it retains the poignancy it delivered back then. Its message is not lost in our present state of affairs.
  16. What makes it the best movie of the year -- is its insight into human behavior.
  17. Feels like a miracle, a movie that exceeds even the most formidable expectations without straying from its singular path. All hail this King.
  18. Part of the accomplishment of Carlos is the sheer accumulation of detail the movie amasses, and the longer running time gives you a deeper sense of the terrorist lifestyle, and when and why Ilich gradually succumbed to ego and self-glorification without realizing it.
  19. This is the sort of small, intimate drama about unpleasant subject matter Hollywood rarely deals with, but Haneke isn't worried about turning off his audience, because death is something everyone has in common. It fascinates us, the way it also scares us.
  20. A soaring, exhilarating fantasy grounded in earthy emotion, Crouching Tiger more than lives up to the hype.
  21. Inside Llewyn Davis is one of the Coens’ smallest movies — this one doesn't have the broad appeal of "True Grit" or "No Country For Old Men" — but like Llewyn’s music, it comes from the heart and it is deeply felt. It is also one of their best.
  22. Skillfully straddles an intriguing line between reality and fiction.
  23. The fact that that character happens to be so repellent -- and yet so endlessly fascinating -- is one of the film's many strokes of genius.
  24. Jackson's dazzling vision turns the story into a real movie-movie -- one that, unlike too many fantasy films today, is genuinely transporting.
  25. A worthy and delirious final chapter to this hallowed animation franchise.
  26. More than once during The Fast Runner (Atanarjuat), it's easy to forget you're watching a movie.
  27. The movie itself is a nominee for Best Animated Feature, and it's good enough to pull a surprise upset over the beloved Finding Nemo. It's a mad masterpiece.
  28. As film noirs go, this one is a classic.
  29. The Queen taps into the universal curiosity the world shares toward royal families -- an element of the movie that Frears wisely mines for gentle humor.
  30. If only Beau Travail had a more dramatic edge, this nicely done film wouldn't have felt so long.
  31. Waltz With Bashir isn't only a harrowing anti-war plea, it is also an eloquent and deeply moving argument that it is critical to never forget human atrocity, lest the past be repeated.
  32. A model of pitch and modulation and craft. For two hours, the Coens hold you in their grip so tightly that for long stretches it feels a little hard to breathe.
  33. Most prison movies are about escape or survival. A Prophet (Un Prophete) is about the creation of a consciousness. This one, too, could have been called “An Education.”
  34. It's not always an easy movie to watch, but its characters are unforgettable.
  35. What Bloody Sunday lacks in clarity, it makes up for with a great, fiery passion.
  36. Her
    Her argues that sometimes, crazy can be wonderful.
  37. It's the filmmakers' refusal to sugarcoat their tale's darker subtexts that makes Finding Nemo such a resounding piece of storytelling.
  38. A joyous, amazingly detailed paean to imagination and personal expression that dares -- and succeeds -- to illustrate one of the most mysterious enigmas of all: the creative process.
  39. This is the most impressive directorial debut since"Reservoir Dogs." Being John Malkovich is weird, all right-- the best kind of weird, the kind you haven't seen before.
  40. Although it is technically a sequel, Before Sunset stands perfectly well on its own. In fact, the new movie plays better if you haven't seen the original for a while, so its details have grown appropriately fuzzy.
  41. A visually thrilling experience.
  42. A rich, marvelous movie -- the kind that enchants on so many different levels, it leaves you feeling giddy.
  43. American Splendor reminds you that sometimes, simply getting out of bed each morning can be the most heroic of acts.
  44. So deliciously absorbing and well done.
  45. There's nothing about United 93 that qualifies as entertainment in the traditional sense: It is an unpleasant, wrenching experience, which is just as it should be.
  46. This remarkable, continually surprising documentary turns out to be something far richer and more complex, closer in spirit to "Crumb," another devastating film about a family's gradual self-destruction.
  47. Like his con artists are prone to saying, American Hustle works from the feet up, and the fun is intoxicating.
  48. In The Act of Killing, director Joshua Oppenheimer pulls off the impossible: He confronts great, incomprehensible evil and puts a human face on it.
  49. It's a sign of just how much Coppola respects her characters that she doesn't make us privy to that final line: It is only meant for them to share. But like the rest of the ethereal Lost in Translation, you don't need to have it spelled out in order to feel it.
  50. Beautifully textured and layered movie.
  51. The result is one of the most visually astonishing martial-arts fantasies ever made.
  52. As suspenseful as a full-blown thriller.
  53. It takes some exceptionally intelligent and witty people to make a dumb comedy this funny and perceptive: Borat may be offensive (to some), infantile, low-brow or even just a stunt, but you won't hate yourself in the morning for loving it.
  54. The most remarkable aspect of Charles Ferguson's lacerating documentary about the U.S. invasion of Iraq is that the film contains virtually no new information, and yet its message is as compelling as if we were hearing it for the first time.
  55. A brazen stunt that pays off. Writer-director Michel Hazanavicius, simultaneously channeling "Singin' in the Rain" and "A Star is Born," tells a story about 1920s Hollywood made in the style of that era.
  56. A thoughtful, audacious meditation on love and relationships that finds a group of wildly disparate talents clicking together in perfect unison.
  57. Film students should be thankful that companies such as Milestone Film & Video have taken up the distribution and restoration of important silent films, and that universities and museums have decided to screen these obscure classics.
  58. Letters From Iwo Jima, much like any war movie, honors the courage of men who took part in a war not necessarily of their making. But by placing us on the opposite side of the battlefield, the movie forces us to approach it from a fresh perspective.
  59. I can't imagine anyone seeing Once and not instantly falling in love with it.
  60. A unique bond still develops between the two outcasts, leading to an unexpected resolution that ends this subtle, deeply humane movie on an ambiguous, but unmistakably hopeful, note.
  61. The movie implies that despite its thunderous success, the book also destroyed Capote, who crossed a line in his quest for personal glory for which he could never forgive himself -- no matter how many accolades it brought him.
  62. The sexual content may be excessive (the movie could have gotten by with just one scene instead of three) and the running time a bit indulgent, but Blue is the Warmest Color grows in power and intensity.
  63. The movie isn't a thriller, but it has the tension of a thriller, and its cool, icy tone, deliberate pacing and clean, antiseptic lines are reminiscent of Kubrick and Antonioni.
  64. As this intimate, beautifully observed film unfolds, you realize that the story's themes -- the nature of love, the role of sex in relationships and the ways in which we learn to make peace with our guilty consciences -- are relevant no matter what age you happen to be.
  65. Satire is at the core of Mafioso, whether in establishing the by-now-stereotypical images of Sicilian peasants or the gripping arms of the Mafia.
  66. For now, The Two Towers feels like the second installment in what next year, when Frodo finally reaches Mount Doom and the story draws to a close, we'll surely be hailing as a masterpiece.
  67. The package is perfectly irresistible.
  68. Tom Hooper's terrific, Oscar-worthy film is not merely a spot-on period piece; it's also a heartfelt study in the shadings of courage, a film about duty and friendship that's often warmly funny and sometimes painful to watch.
  69. Up
    Rousing, exhilarating entertainment.
  70. Unabashedly frank in its depiction of sex -- too frank, probably, for more discreet viewers -- but it's never exploitive or seedy.
  71. It's impossible not to shake the feeling that we've been here before, and the movie never does convince you that a return trip was entirely necessary.
  72. Luminous, melancholy and ultimately heartbreaking.
  73. It's not a wonderful family, and the lives thus illuminated aren't sweet at all. But the movie is both things. In his sheer affinity for the human, Leigh approaches the great Jean Renoir. What fun to watch. [21 Feb. 1992, p.5]
  74. Doesn't feel so much like a movie as a glimpse into the extraordinarily messed-up life of a young man about to make the simple yet life-changing realization that actions have consequences, and that other people matter, too.
  75. The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
  76. This is a quiet, powerful film about the lengths we'll go to for the sake of the people we love - and the depths we'll sink to for the sake of the ones we hate.
  77. All is Lost is more fun to think about than it is to actually watch: It’s a testament to a great actor, an experimental piece of cinema and a bit of a bore.
  78. Shot in the style of a documentary, which lends the movie an aura of utter realism, Maria Full of Grace derives an unsettling power from the clinical details of Maria's ordeal.
  79. The film never lacks dignity. Fateless doesn't look at life at the camp like Roberto Benigni did in "Life is Beautiful."
  80. The most compelling -- and horrifying -- portion of the film, which interweaves archival footage and stylish graphics with the interview segments, centers on the firebombing of Japan during World War II.
  81. This poignant, wise and subtle picture -- which, yes, happens to be the best movie of the year -- should be approached with humble expectations. Lee's approach to this delicate material is suffused with melancholy, metaphors and small, telling touches that favor subtlety over exclamation points and rough-hewn simplicity over grandiloquence.
  82. As usual for the Dardennes, the plot is slight but loaded with hairpin turns of tremendous emotional power.
  83. And so the saga of Harry Potter comes to an end - not with a whimper but with a rousing thunderclap of incident, emotion, suspense and old-fashioned movie magic.
  84. The movie is such an intense, disturbing and exhilarating experience, even five more minutes might have felt like too much.
  85. Murderball invokes fascination toward its protagonists, because it views them with the same confidence and acceptance they view themselves.
  86. Herzog himself is one of the great lunatic directors of our century, a mad genius who repeatedly attempts to challenge nature and the gods in his own films.
  87. The work of a talented filmmaker coasting on his own fumes.
  88. The movie is an absolute triumph of culturally relevant filmmaking – a film that will thrill and fascinate sport junkies and non-fans alike. If you like baseball, you will love this movie. If you hate baseball, you will still love this movie.
  89. A savage, insane movie - in the best way possible.
  90. Even in its most tedious scenes, Russian Ark is mesmerizing.
  91. He just wasn't the sort of hero the government pretended he was. This eye-opening, inspiring movie is a permanent corrective to that deception.
  92. The movie has a longing melancholy that leavens the humor — it’s a surprisingly sad, gentle comedy.
  93. A terrific yarn, one so engrossing and surprising that the nature of the story's structure -- each question Jamal gets asked on the show corresponds with a traumatic or momentous moment from his childhood -- never feels like a contrived framing device.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A truly great and deceptively simple work, redefining the power of film.
  94. The Straight Story truly is one from the heart, and it is wonderful.
  95. One of the many pleasures of this beautifully composed, measured movie is how it reminds you of the power of pure storytelling -- an art that's too often overlooked in contemporary films in the rush for sensation and excitement.
  96. A remarkable movie that merits a place alongside "The Executioner's Song" and "In Cold Blood" as an unforgettable depiction of tragedy in the heartland.
  97. A treat to anyone who already cherishes Varda's films and a perfect primer for those who haven't yet discovered her work.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    For girls and boys who like games, ideas and toys, Back to the Future probably is worth an afternoon's good giggle. But baby boomers be forewarned: You had a better guffaw at Son of Flubber! [3 July 1985, p.D9]
  98. This is a talky picture, based on a historical incident where the outcome is already known – yet it still proves much more engrossing than crime dramas or bank robberies.

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