Miami Herald's Scores

For 539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Shield: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Just Legal: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 280
  2. Negative: 0 out of 280
280 tv reviews
  1. This peculiar comedy-drama has some cockeyed wrinkles that make it interesting.
  2. What it does have is a sleek but shallow cast that cannot lend any weight to the lighter-than-air writing.
  3. It is at once insanely juvenile and very sophisticated, appealing to a funny bone that, as an adult, I try to hide. I feel guilty about laughing, but I laugh anyway. [13 Aug 1997]
    • Miami Herald
  4. Akerman has wit and style, and so does the show.
  5. With enough chemistry between its stars to power a DuPont lab and a wise use of off-the-beaten-path South Florida shooting locations -- it goes for a fetid swamp over South Beach every time -- The Glades is thoroughly enjoyable.
  6. By the end, Sleepy Hollow seems less like a show than a garage sale of used story pitches.
  7. The cynical and cerebral Threshold is the darkest of the three new space-alien shows, so much so that the producers seem to be wondering if the human race is even worth saving.
  8. With the debut of Julia Louis-Dreyfus' show tonight, [Seinfeld] has now spawned five relentlessly unfunny and compulsively unwatchable sitcoms.
  9. Revolution is big, bold and brassy adventure, a cowboys-and-Indians story for end times.
  10. In its first episode, Barbershop drops the ball, mistaking mere profanity for edginess and digging for laughs in dull, typical sitcom fashion. [14 Aug 2005, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
  11. It's ABC's attempt to replicate last season's wildly successful intergenerational comedy Modern Family, and, like many genetic experiments, it ends in mutant disaster.
  12. Every case is wrapped up in precisely 42 terse minutes, with no dangling threads to trouble consciences or make syndication sales tough. If you liked any of the other L&Os, you'll probably like this one. If you didn't, well....
  13. With dazzling action scenes and a pair of stars who ooze charm and sensuality, Undercovers easily overcomes its predictability.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Whatever Carey's trademark humor may be, it's lost in the translation to this forgettable show. [13 Sep 1995]
    • Miami Herald
  14. True Blood is an unlikely but irresistible mixture of pungent political satire, observant pop sociology and lurid drive-in thrills.
  15. Nor is The L Word all sexual sturm und drang. Its light moments are laugh-out-loud funny. [18 Jan 2004, p.3M]
    • Miami Herald
  16. Like the people whose story it tells -- those bright, over- educated, social-climbing, New York killer careerists and consumerists (I'm avoiding the dreaded Y-word here) -- Baby Boom is affected, but stylish. Like its subjects, it can be annoying with its display of superficial trappings like a designer kitchen. But once the veneer is stripped away, the show -- and its main character, J.C. Wiatt (the reliably engaging Jackson) -- can be rather pleasant. [10 Sept 1998, p.B1]
    • Miami Herald
  17. Happily, Golden Boy not only manages a fairly original take on cop shows but actually turns out to be surprisingly intriguing.
  18. It's a provocative mishmash of future shock and peculiar anachronisms. [19 Sept 2002, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
  19. This tale of a lonely cop left behind by everyone--partners, friends, lovers, even the criminals he pursues--has a piercing melancholy that elevates it way above its fantasy trappings.
  20. That's a lot of stories to tell, and the sweeping Hell on Wheels does a good job of chopping them into bite-size pieces.
  21. Mob City would be better if it were just a little bit more raw--there’s something amiss when a putative sleazy jazz dive looks like you could eat off the floors. But its proudly pulpy sensibilities and its startling plot twists make it a whiskey-and-a-shot pleasure.
  22. Like its ancestor, the new Dallas is self-consciously a trashfest, an endless cycle of betrayals, confrontations, reconciliations and re-betrayals.
  23. The reshot pilot episode that will be broadcast Tuesday is no longer irritating, but neither is it distinctive, just one more humdrum cop drama, notable only for wasting a high-powered cast that includes Michael Imperioli (The Sopranos) and Aisha Hinds (True Blood).
  24. That single season will be hellacious fun. Stuffed with visual puns and sly homages to horror movies from Jaws to Poltergeist, Harper's Island relentlessly mocks film grammar with set pieces that take off in unexpected directions.
  25. For now, Alcatraz is a sinister bag of sinister pleasures.
  26. Mike & Molly unquestionably has a lot of funny moments. But realizing you've just been laughing at 22 consecutive minutes of socially unredeemed fat jokes may leave you feeling as if you've just eaten a 36-inch anchovy-and-pineapple pizza: bloated and yucky.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    South Riding has everything you could want from a Masterpiece event: perfect period details, a forlornly gray surf, a swelling soundtrack, disputes over crunchy-gravel real estate, whistling trains and black-tie dinners in hotels, a believable and compelling story involving multiple characters and plots and a faithfulness to its original material that allows for a textured, even sorrowful, bleakness.
  27. Worst Week certainly has some genuine laughs, but they run out well before the pratfalls and pee-pee jokes do.
  28. Crisply written and acted, grafting some Enron-era scandal onto a morality tale that goes back to Faust, 666 Park Avenue gives good goosebump.
  29. However badly you thought American race relations were going, Black. White. will make you feel worse.
  30. Surreal and then some.
  31. Almost Human is a tolerably silly sci-fi action show set in a Blade Runner-ish future where human cops are paired with robots to battle the high-tech gangs that have the run of the seedy streets.
  32. Like True Blood, Banshee can be preposterously entertaining, or perhaps entertainingly preposterous.
  33. Sins of fathers and mothers not only visit each of the characters, but infest them; the show shimmers with an inner core of volcanic anger that makes it far more interesting than your average family soap.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Pilot plays like network TV's answer to the Tailhook scandal, pretending to wear a feminist attitude while managing to make its women characters ridiculous, obnoxious or scantily clad. [23 Sep 1995]
    • Miami Herald
  34. OK, OK, A Gifted Man, is not as bad as all that [Friendly-ghost mothers-in-law? Friendly-ghost proctologists? Friendly-ghost telephone solicitors?]. But it's not good, either.
  35. Though dazzlingly plotted and acted, the show is not easily watched.
  36. Repellent and fascinating, a stygian nightmare awash in sick lusts, it seems certain to attract large audiences and huge controversy.
  37. Though it's intended to be a female buddy show in which she plays off Sasha Alexander's coolly uppercrust medical examiner Maura Isles, Harmon definitely gets the upper hand--at least in the pilot episode.
  38. Even Ramsay's most barbarous fans are likely to find this formula so thin by now that, by comparison, Louise Roe looks like a blimp.
  39. It was all quite boring...What the series does have going for it is a nostalgic sense of humor and Bakula, whom some may recall from Eisenhower and Lutz, a midseason show that lasted about 10 minutes last spring. Bakula has this hound-dog kind of handsomeness and a certain goofy charm...What it has going against it, is its sheer nutty illogic. Even science fiction is supposed to have some ground rules. God? Holograms? Amnesia? Come on! This thing is just nonsense.
    • Miami Herald
  40. CBS' new comedy-drama The Ex List is a descent to the most profound levels of Chick Flick Hell, where the damned and those with Y chromosomes cry out in agony through all eternity.
  41. It's hard to say which is more unlikely: That a corporate legal fang could be God's prophet; or that the Almighty would spread His word through visions of George Michael; or these matters could be blended into a daffily funny and affecting television show.
  42. The Unit hits more false notes than an American Idol tryout.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    If you've followed the TV careers of Charmed's stars -- Shannen Doherty (Beverly Hills 90210), Holly Marie Combs (Picket Fences) and Alyssa Milano (Who's the Boss) -- then just the idea of all three being in the same show makes it worth a look. The premise is at times campy, but it works. [7 Oct 1998, p.3D]
    • Miami Herald
  43. Drugs. Pratfalls. Bodily excretions. Sexual crudity. Shock-jock ethnic humor. Four-letter words flying like lead in a matineee Western. Character development and story? Not so much.
  44. Shraeger is played with breezy, cynical wit by Amber Tamblyn (who may have her own secrets; she's looking rather more bosomy than she did a few years back as God's BFF in in "Joan of Arcadia"). And she gets capable backup from a cast that includes Adam Goldberg and Harold Perrineau.
  45. Creator Kelley delights in making fun of his characters, and he can't sustain the bizarre tone. [18 Sept 1992, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
  46. Where Modern Family is sweet and funny, The New Normal is cheap and hectoring.
  47. My Own Worst Enemy is by far the best drama of the fall season, a bold and brainy spy thriller that practices a sort of armed existentialism.
  48. Cop Rock is neither a realistic police drama nor a convincing musical. It's an experiment that's rarely arresting. [26 Sep 1990, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
  49. Welcome to The Goode Family, a scathingly funny report from the front lines of America's culture wars.
  50. Watching this dismal intragenerational cluster of families is sort of like seeing a Roots for the cannibal gangs in The Road.
  51. Suits is far more than a whimsical caper show. Beneath its cuttingly funny dialogue lurk complex emotional edges.
  52. Royal Pains has some moments of genuine wit--a lot more of them after Costanzo shows up.
  53. Chronicling the opposite relationships requires Mad Love to bounce from light romantic comedy to murderously hostile wisecracks and back again, which it accomplishes with considerable deftness. The show's quick wit is matched with a talented cast, particularly Labine.
  54. Cutler’s documentary The World According to Dick Cheney is a rousing piece of work.
  55. If you think "SpongeBob Squarepants" would be funnier if it added a couple of hookers and a cross-dressing junkie, this is the show for you. Everybody else should take a pass.
  56. It’s an insidious whitewash of a convicted killer and an infamous smear of his victim. It’s a shame on all involved.... The closest thing to fairness in Phil Spector is the blow-you-away performance by Al Pacino in the title role.
  57. Shark works some of the same ground as Fox's new legal drama Justice, but with far more wit and style.
  58. Pointless, charmless and bound to be viewerless after the first half-hour or so, The Philanthropist recalls such epochal television bombs as Manimal (a scientist who could turn into a crime-fighting dolphin) or It's About Time (astronauts break the time barrier and frolick happily with cavemen) in its conceptual imbecility.
  59. Intense and fascinating.
  60. Syfy's show relies a lot more on dripping fangs and never speaks in a whisper when a bellow will do--even the simplest conversations are conducted with the neurotic intensity of a bad soap opera. Simply put, this Being Human lacks any human warmth.
  61. Refreshing, low-key and true to its small-town Texas setting, the series goes against the grain of most so-called current "family entertainment." This isn't another inane sitcom with dopey adults and unbearably cute kiddies. Everyone here seems natural, real. [1 Oct 1993]
    • Miami Herald
  62. Not since HBO’s The Wire left the air five years ago has a television series combined urban decay and moral decrepitude in such stark--and yet compulsively watchable--terms.
  63. Samantha Who? is not only a sitcom but a pungently funny one about self-discovery, reinvention and the possibility that beauty may be only skin-deep, but bitch goes right down to the bone.
  64. Alice’s battles with various computer-animated and live-action threats are entertaining and, usually, rather witty, though her traveling companions, the White Rabbit (voiced by John Lithgow) and the Knave of Hearts (Michael Socha, the proletarian werewolf in the later season’s of the BBC version of Being Human), get most of the best lines.
  65. No matter who’s on screen or what they’re doing, Back in the Game is gut-bustingly hilarious.
  66. At times Smith seems less like a crime drama than a character study of a collection of seriously damaged people. But the show's metabolism is enjoyably unpredictable.
  67. The multiplicity of story lines and characters turns Las Vegas into a complex undertaking, but Caan, Duhamel and their excellent castmates make it work, brilliantly. [22 Sept 2003, p.4E]
    • Miami Herald
  68. Wildly uneven. [22 Sept 1994]
    • Miami Herald
  69. Poignantly funny.
  70. Psych is a one-trick pony that quickly deteriorates into a rather humdrum mystery once the novelty of watching Spencer fake his psychic revelations wears off.
  71. Watching seven characters sit around week after week in endless discussions of the ramifications of the fact that two of them have kissed may have been fun in the seventh grade. But, like the spinning teacups at Disney World or throwing up after drinking a jug of Ripple, it's an experience that doesn't wear well with time.
  72. Padalecki and Ackles are hunky, funny and a joy to watch.
  73. The CW's tale of an evil twin and an even eviler twin, is devious doppelganger drama at its best.
  74. The subtext of loss and longing, which sometimes isn’t all that sub, makes The Crazy Ones a tightrope act. But Kelley gets tremendous support from his cast. The madcap Williams has never been better, and Gellar’s performance is a magnificently winning mixture of quiet desperation, mounting rage and wistful yearning.
  75. It's a drab third-generation clone (a spinoff of the original NCIS, which in turn was a spinoff of JAG) of a show from the shallow end of the TV gene pool.
  76. The answers unfold with a delicious tension that makes Graceland an unexpected pleasure.
  77. By focusing on the science used by crime-scene investigators, C.S.I. puts a creative spin on the traditional cop-show genre. [6 Oct 2000, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  78. Starz, however, has re-imagined the doings of Arthur, Guinevere and the gang as a bloody, bodice-ripping medieval soap opera, and the result is surprisingly satisfying.
  79. Carrie's antics in New York are a kind of chick version of Matthew Broderick's madcap adventures in Ferris Bueller's Day Off. But Schwartz can't cut the umbilical cord--perhaps fallopian tube is a more apt metaphor--to his original source material, and that's where The Carrie Diaries goes off the rails.
  80. America's Next Great Restaurant is quickly undone by the same mean-spiritedness that makes Survivor, American Idol and the rest of this genre such an unpleasant viewing experience. Winning depends at least as much (and probably much more) on impressing the producers with television skills as it does on winning over the judges with culinary expertise or business savvy. So taunting and backbiting among the contestants is a dreary constant.
  81. Until the confrontation scene, Fresh Prince coasts along on the considerable charm of Smith, who is making his acting debut at 21. Many shows before it have relied on their stars, but that last scene gives an intriguing insight into what Fresh Prince could be. [9 Sept 1990, p.H1]
    • Miami Herald
  82. JoAnna Garcia's overcaffeinated cuteness--the sort of thing that made otherwise decent people want to run Sally Field through with a pitchfork back in her Gidget and Flying Nun days--as a Palm Beach governess to trust-fund teen trash is nigh unbearable.
  83. Its essential shallowness is on display from the very start, when 11 contestants for a junior editor's job at the fashion magazine Elle are issued their first challenge: Bring the boss breakfast.
  84. You just can't get through two minutes of Back to You without a belly laugh.
  85. Everything seems hacky and incomplete.
  86. Just about everybody is having sex with everybody else: Kings is one giant raging id of a show.
  87. If Wings wants a long run, it would do well to lay off the plane crash jokes and the sexist bits. It has the cast and concept to go places. [19 Apr 1990, p.F1]
    • Miami Herald
  88. Unforgettable is a quirky, captivating take on the police procedurals that have been a staple of the CBS schedule over the past decade.
  89. [It] often sounds less like a television drama than a Criminal Procedures 101 lecture delivered at an offshore law school.
  90. Some of the bits are awfully predictable, like tough-guy Sands mellowing into a big-brother type for a young street punk who (amazing coincidence alert) has a hottie older sister. Others are more interesting, particularly a debate between Goldberg and Marte over whether warring on drugs makes any sense.
  91. To the extent this sounds interesting, it isn't: Half the dialogue seems to have been written for barking dogs, the other half for mewling kittens, and the cast performs accordingly.
  92. As drama, Memphis Beat is a dreary failure, a formulaic cop show distinguished only by its poor execution.
  93. Half the fun in this outlandishly funny sitcom is that Penny is so spacey that she doesn't appear to recognize what hard-core nerds Leonard and Sheldon really are--even the presence in their bathroom of Luke Skywalker No-More-Tears Shampoo doesn't tip her off.
  94. The show's intricate plotting and finely rendered characters will engage your brain, but there's plenty of below-the-shoulders action, too.
  95. This is sporadically funny, but Tim is too slight -- the back-to-back episodes are only 10 to 12 minutes long -- and relies way too much on the supposed shock value of cartoon characters uttering four-letter words to be consistently entertaining.
  96. Intelligent and entertaining reimaginations of stupefyingly bad pieces of 1970s sci-fi hackwork.

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