New York Daily News' Scores

For 6,583 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Lowest review score: 0 Postal
Score distribution:
6583 movie reviews
  1. Gloriously inventive, delightfully nutty comic treasure is unlike anything you've ever seen. It's lunatic.
  2. The most gripping based-on-fact film so far this year.
  3. This year’s foreign language Oscar scandal – there is always at least one – is the snub of director Cristian Mungiu’s disturbing, masterful realist drama following two college roommates as they carry out plans for one’s black market abortion in Communist Romania.
  4. If you've had a hole in your heart since "Everybody Loves Raymond" ended, Tom Caltabiano's low-key documentary about star Ray Romano ought to fill the gap nicely.
  5. In the year of the animated movie, this one soars above them all.
  6. If you don’t love monkeys already — and really, we all should — then Monkey Kingdom will swing you in the right direction.
  7. Spielberg's direction and Melissa Mathison's script never lose sight of the realistic, low center of gravity world of childhood, in which such marvelous adventures happen every day that an alien knocking around the garage is not really such an unusual occurrence. [2002 re-release]
  8. A great big sloppy kiss of entertainment for audiences weary of explosions, CGI effects and sequels, sequels, sequels.
  9. While the vocal performances of Hanks, Allen and company make up a perfect ensemble, and its visual leaps astound, TS3's real power sneaks up on you.
  10. Director Werner Herzog's latest cinematic mind trip blows you away with its beauty.
  11. Andrew Bujalski's considerable gifts begin with his deep appreciation of the miserable, hilarious awkwardness of real life.
  12. Handsome, passionate and fun. It's everything we go to the movies for.
  13. The result is a stunningly nervy sequel that vaporizes any worries that Abrams’ terrific 2009 reboot was a fluke.
  14. Though Borat has been likened to "Jackass," there's a huge difference. The "Jackass" movies are about extreme stunts. Borat is about interaction and gullibility, and its success is unique to both Cohen and to this one-time-only movie.
  15. Every moment feels human and true, from the naive optimism of the trip's sendoff to its unsparingly realistic conclusion, which trades reckless hope for quiet honor.
  16. Borderline brilliant. Tackles the war on drugs from a kaleidoscope of perspectives.
  17. Inside Out is the year’s best film so far. After you see it, you’ll say that’s a no-brainer.
  18. The sunny, funny, toe-tapping Lagaan is the answer to those who ask why they don't make movies like they used to: They do, but in India.
  19. One of the most original and ultimately confounding mind games to reach the screen since "The Usual Suspects."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's action-packed, darker, more epic and thankfully schmaltz-free. And it's the best "Harry Potter" film yet.
  20. Most impressive of all, The Avengers makes superhero movies new again - a colossal task indeed.
  21. Mary's search drives The Tillman Story, and throughout this taut, true epic, we see a smart, sometimes angry, always loving family find their destiny: to speak truth to power, to call wartime myths what they are and to show how the American character is not about blind obedience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Among the ties with the past, the opening portion introduces a comic orgy that is deliberate parallel cantina scene in “Star Wars” and among the new thrills there is an airborne vehicle chase through a forest, projected at a speed to leave audiences dizzy.
  22. Brilliant. [24 December 1997, p. 24]
    • New York Daily News
  23. Director Matt Reeves (who also made the much rawer "Cloverfield") so deeply understands the nature of childhood terror that Let Me In burns with a white-hot clarity.
  24. The battle it documents is both a cornerstone of the past and a reflection of ongoing struggles. DuVernay infuses Selma with that dichotomy, never forgetting how Selma, the place, was a pledge to march ahead.
  25. The best comedy of 2004. In fact, it's so far the best movie of the year.
  26. With its agile, clever script and winning characters, Toy Story 2 is that rare thing -- an excellent children's movie with no upper age limit.
  27. It took the German restorers four years to ready this print using dupe negatives and old prints found in archives around the world. Their work speaks for itself. Each frame of this classic is drop-dead stunning, the more so now that the movie no longer hiccups its way across the screen.
  28. Levinson is so skillful at developing personalities, even among the story's would-be villains, that by the halfway point of the movie, every gesture and expression has unexpected depth and texture. The performances are across-the-board superb.
  29. Chandor (“All is Lost”) has made a movie that quietly but ferociously immerses us in a time and place, with atmosphere done in minimal yet evocative strokes.
  30. A thrill ride with a brain.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Thomas Vinterberg’s romantic rollercoaster honors Hardy’s rustic vibe. Remarkably, too, he’s made a thoroughly modern film anyone can relate to — it’s like a “what a woman wants” discussion set in Victorian times. It’s also an instant classic.
  31. It's an uplifting movie about the rewards of perseverance and community.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Winter Sleep won’t appeal to action lovers, but if you like endless verbal warfare, this is a joy.
  32. A gripping thriller whose terror -- unfortunately -- comes from real life.
  33. The fear, desperation and hope of Time Out of Mind is painfully, hauntingly human.
  34. An adorable, infectious work of true sophistication.
  35. The biggest little movie of the year - and one of the best ever about the news media.
  36. A movie-movie of the first rank.
  37. The best part is that unlike “Lost,” “Battlestar Galactica” and “The Sopranos,” you won't be left scratching your head about the thrilling, completely satisfying ending.
  38. This audience-pleaser is smart and acerbic. Jaoui has an uncanny ear - as director, co-writer and part of the inspired ensemble cast - for human foibles, self-deception, celebrity worship and female body issues.
  39. McQueen has made a film comparable to “Schindler’s List” — art that may be hard to watch, but which is an essential look at man’s inhumanity to man. It is wrenching, but 12 Years a Slave earns its tears in a way few films ever do.
  40. A work deeper than its nickname, "The Facebook Movie," hints at - coils around your brain. Weeks after seeing it, moments from it will haunt you.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What you'll remember most will be Renner's remarkably complex commander. By the time we finally figure him out, it's become clear we've witnessed a star-making performance, in a movie that deserves to stand as one of the defining films of the decade.
  41. A generation-spanning journey that feels both comfortingly familiar and excitingly original.
  42. It leaves the port of enterprise and arrives on the far shore of art.
  43. One of the most skillful, mesmerizing, tense and satisfying time-warp thrillers ever made.
  44. The incredibly moving post-9/11 drama Reign Over Me proves that behind the funny guy facades of former standup comedians Mike Binder and Adam Sandler are a pair of very serious talents.
  45. May be the best movie of the year.
  46. Film makers Barak Goodman and Daniel Anker dig deep into the story and its ramifications, exposing how the twin evils of racism and anti-Semitism combined to foment institutional injustice, and led — if a silver lining could be found — to the triumphs of the civil-rights movement two and three decades later.
  47. In the end, it's a sweeping, important film that overturns everything you learned in school about the birth of this nation.
  48. The most emotionally satisfying because, in addition to having both more intimate drama and more spectacular battles, it resolves all of the issues raised before.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is a stunningly effective thriller, as cleverly engineered by director Steven Spielberg (with considerable assist from film editor, Verna Fields) as the mechanical sharks that everyone knows by now play the great white shark.
  49. Garbus spent three years patiently mining for beauty in the ugliest of environments. The remarkable result stands as a challenge to anyone who would have seen only the worst and walked right by.
  50. America's favorite superhero reappears in Bryan Singer's Superman Returns, and all we can say is, "Man, oh Man of Steel, it's good to have you back."
  51. A daring, teeth-grinding experience that doesn't let the viewer rest easy.
  52. Almodovar is adept at weaving together strands you'd never guess would match.
  53. For sheer bravura film making, for creating a cartoon world with real air, flesh, blood and the exhilarating cycle of fear and escape, Dinosaur is tops.
  54. An insanely delicious animated feature.
  55. Steven Spielberg's best war film -- and one of the two or three best movies the director has made.
  56. It's really a movie about love at first sight, about the dizzying early days of a relationship, about a passion so strong it can't be described, or denied. And that's something everyone can identify with. If they're lucky.
  57. What a movie! This is how the medium seduced us originally.
  58. Halfway into Blue Valentine, a work so beautifully acted and emotionally honest it is my choice for best movie of the year, there's an amazing flashback scene you hope never ends.
  59. Zipper captures the erasing of one of New York’s most unique stamps by cartoon businesspeople with dollar signs for eyeballs.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No wonder the vodka bottle beckons in this wrenchingly acted, remorseless modern masterpiece.
  60. The stop-the-presses news from The House of Mirth is the number of fine performances from people you never knew had it in them.
  61. A tart, funny and tremendously sobering movie about the deepest recesses of personal unhappiness.
  62. When you get through it, though, you can’t help but feel uplifted by this tough-skinned movie that can stand with the best muscular wartime dramas in the American movie canon.
  63. It's an antidote to complacency. The question is, whom is it trying to wake up?
  64. The irony is that Ebert famously lost his actual voice. Yet as the extraordinary documentary Life Itself shows, that couldn’t quiet one of America’s most beloved critics and cultural commentators.
  65. This summer's best popcorn flick.
  66. Washington can bank on an Oscar nomination for the most forceful work of his career.
  67. Despite being about a royal family at a critical moment in history, The King's Speech doesn't shout about its many strengths. Rather, it urges you to lean in close, where its intelligence and heart come through loud and clear.
  68. An evocative vision of self-destruction, a gorgeously crafted time capsule, and a fantastic showcase for Oscar Isaac in the title role.
  69. Once in a great while there's a movie that's so funny, infectious and welcoming - a movie that makes you feel so good about America and the people in it - you just want to climb inside the screen and live there. That's the case with Dave Chappelle's Block Party - part comedy, part concert film, part avant-garde experiment, and all of it a joy.
  70. Payne achieves an impressive control over the look and tone, so that, melancholy as the movie is, it comes off as both comedy and comment on the human condition.
  71. At times, Chicago has the feel of a revue, with the major characters taking turns at their own show-stopping numbers. If it's too much of a good thing, I say, bring it on.
  72. As darkness falls over the movie landscape comes the year's darkest and best movie of them all - Alejandro González Iñárritu's 21 Grams.
  73. A marvel of character-driven drama that no serious filmgoer should miss.
  74. This bold movie may sound like a stunt, but it’s so much more than that. Linklater is an effortless, genial auteur, and his passions are woven through “Dazed and Confused,” “School of Rock” and the “Before Sunrise” trilogy. Here, his mellow groove becomes an everyday rhythm.
  75. Despite his draw to tragic subjects, Lonergan holds onto a sharp, dark, Irish sense of humor, and a feel for the absurd that comes out at the most unexpected times. A playwright's sense of what actors do, too. Affleck gives a career-best performance here.
  76. A sunny-looking movie about the darkest paranoia.
  77. Here is something great and startling -- not necessarily the kind of comforting, consensus-creating film that wins Oscars, but unquestionably a movie that will live in the history of the medium.
  78. As important and eye-opening a documentary as you’ll see this year, A Place at the Table makes it impossible to think of hunger as merely another symptom of a shredded social safety net.
  79. You might not agree with Stone that the man is a hero, but you probably do want to see the film so you can compute what the whole uproar was about.
  80. It's said to be an autobiography, but that pertains only in the loosest sense. It's a comedy. It's a 1920s silent movie. It is practically indescribable. And it is pure genius.
  81. It shows that life is what happens when you're busy making other plans. And how, in case we forget, every age can predict the next.
  82. Don't miss The Fast Runner. If you do, you will deprive yourself of not only one of the most intriguing feature-film projects in decades and enough plain-spoken anthropology for three credits at Harvard, but one of the most flat-out entertaining movies of the year.
    • New York Daily News
  83. Exquisitely moving story.
    • New York Daily News
  84. The new Star Trek is more than a coat of paint on a space-age wagon train. It's an exciting, stellar-yet-earthy blast that successfully blends the hip and the classic.
  85. Among the funniest and most satisfying films I've seen in years.
  86. It's the perfect antidote to overprocessed entertainment, for moviegoers of any age.
  87. A masterpiece? Probably. Ingenious? Absolutely! Unforgettable? I'll see you at the 10th-year anniversary.
  88. The overall result is a romantic comedy that indulges fantasies, calms insecurities (can an ordinary bloke stack up?), and breaks and mends hearts with surgical precision.
  89. Chimpanzee lets everyone feel like a mini-Jane Goodall.
  90. This amazingly beautiful, and amazingly frightening, documentary captures the immediacy of what climate change is doing to the Arctic landscape.
  91. A juicy noir stew of amorality that's the best thing since "Chinatown."
  92. Gyllenhaal is charming and makes unexpected choices in her performance, but this is Bridges' show, and he's as Best Actor-worthy as he's ever been.
  93. If a documentary can be both alarming and oddly reassuring, it's the gripping splash of cold cinematic water Racing Extinction.

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