New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Sons of Anarchy: Season 6
Lowest review score: 0 I've Got A Secret: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. In many ways, Branagh's Wallander slides seamlessly into a long line of screen detectives who think more loudly than they talk.
  2. Moguls & Movie Stars has been assembled with obvious care, using a wide range of illustrative material and charming interviews with surviving major characters, descendants and historians.
  3. It remains a show to which the viewer must pay close attention.
  4. Watching this show feels like walking around Manhattan, and you don't have to be a dog person to think that's fun.
  5. A half-dozen plots routinely swirl around Copper, banging into each other. Levinson and the cast never let them unravel.
  6. To say we actually like any of these characters would be stretching it. But we're drawn into their lives, and as it starts its second season, Sons of Anarchy can't be left out of any conversation about the golden age of cable drama.
  7. The show still occasionally talks about this stuff more than real-life guys probably would. But mostly it lets the action speak for itself. Men of a Certain Age is aging well.
  8. Goldberg’s documentary doesn’t dwell on the what-ifs. It focuses on what a remarkable woman did accomplish, just by making us laugh.
  9. Olyphant's even a little better this season than last, as he settles further into the Givens skin. He captures the marshal's essential confidence while never giving away one syllable more than he wants to reveal about the hand he's holding. Further enhancing the fun, there's a new crook in town.
  10. It plays at its own pace, a little more deliberate than other TV dramas, and its strongest moments are often understated.
  11. It's a premise that requires as much clever dramatic footwork as you might expect, and creator Joe Weisberg, a former CIA agent, handles the challenge.
  12. With Minnie Driver and Morena Baccarin as two of Jacob’s wives, and Debra Winger as Dinah’s blunt-speaking grandmother, the story is engaging both as untold Biblical fable and modern-day television.
  13. Sunday’s opening of season five proves again that Falco makes this show, primarily by connecting all the passageways between comedy and tragedy.
  14. Some of Star-Crossed falls into the CW’s well-trod comfort zone: young-adult romantic drama with a sci-fi twist. It shows extra ambition, though, by putting its outsiders so constantly and viscerally close to those who suspect and fear them. Add forbidden love, which can never escape the shadow of potential doom, and Star-Crossed could become both provocative and entertaining.
  15. While he starts off a little rusty, the second episode proves he’s kept his edge.
  16. Late Night lets the host act a little more relaxed, and Meyers uses that freedom well.
  17. Fans of the film will devour the TV series, and nonfans might give it a shot. Just be forewarned that it’s not “Blue Bloods.” It’s more like cold blood.
  18. Some of the pirates tonight, perhaps inevitably, take on a little of Johnny Depp's Jack Sparrow. But the acting is generally solid and the action is both stirring and, happily, easy to follow.
  19. The Blacklist won’t be the most cerebral show on television. It’s a fast-paced mystery that’s just plain entertaining.
  20. It's not that we haven't seen the polar regions before. But this special, narrated by Alec Baldwin, puts it all together in a way that makes it feel consistently more intriguing than the nature films you remember from school.
  21. Game of Thrones, partly because it’s as cold-blooded as its characters in treating personnel turnover as the natural order, seems to have little trouble keeping its pedal to the metal.
  22. A promising new summer series.
  23. Mary doesn't win 'em all, but In Plain Sight is a W for USA.
  24. The pilot, which obviously had a big budget, looks almost as sleek as a movie. Creator Joss Whedon promises the show will work hard to stay on that level. It will live or die, however, on whether we want to keep watching its characters. Right up front, the answer is we do.
  25. Fortunately, someone finally grabs hold of the wheel and steers it back to where it belongs, as one of the great character dramas of contemporary television.
  26. Damages is a show that has always required a viewer's full attention, and the rewards are there for those who do.
  27. Add strong performances by a dozen major characters, starting with Claire Foy as Little Dorrit, and you've got the kind of production television is often accused of having abandoned.
  28. Freaks and Geeks is tapping into something primal: adolescents' hunger to begin to understand themselves and their world. Freaks and Geeks is too honest to offer answers. But it affirms the value and the universality of asking the questions. [24 Sept 1999, p.140]
    • New York Daily News
  29. The Loving Story is a different kind of 1960s civil rights tale, one that in many ways has a deeper level of warmth.
  30. Visually, Korra is striking. It's full of little tricks and nuances that only true fans will notice and savor, but nothing prevents civilians from enjoying it as well. The same holds for the mythology.
  31. It's a feel-good story, and what makes it more satisfying is that in contrast to so many reality shows, the people here feel genuine, with no sense they're performing for the camera. This one's a contender.
  32. A lot of viewers may say, "I can't watch this." It will reward those who do.
  33. Lifetime's new Against the Wall turns out to be first-rate drama. In fact, it's one of the best new shows of the year.
  34. Okay, it gets silly. But silly can be funny, too, and Archer is, as noted, consistently funny.
  35. Thanks to winning performances by Cameron, Chenoweth and others, it's a flick the family can sit down and enjoy.
  36. Skillfully directed by Tommy Kail (“Hamilton”) and boasting exuberant choreography by Zach Woodlee and period-perfect costumes by William Ivey Long, Grease went down as easy as a chocolate malted.
  37. Unforgettable is exactly what a summer show should be: fast-paced and fun.
  38. In the larger sense, Empire is a music soap the way “Scandal” is a political soap, and it already has that same densely packed swirl of interlocking stories.
  39. While some of their "family values" are perverse and illegal, most are rooted in the same principles embraced by the straightest arrows in town. That's what makes them more than motorcycle thugs and makes their show worth the discomfort it sometimes takes to ride with it.
  40. A solid, nonjudgmental documentary on a man so tortured he almost killed himself, yet gifted with remarkable insight into human behavior, his and ours.
  41. Being Mary Jane is a film for grownups. A good film for grownups.
  42. What the show doesn't say, but wouldn't mind our noticing, is that even today we should be very careful about giving up some part of our freedom because someone tells us it will "solve" some other problem.
  43. The reset on USA’s breezy legal drama Suits turns out to be more like ordering a different flavor latte at the same coffee shop. That’s okay, because it’s a good coffee shop.
  44. Brooklyn Nine-Nine is the funniest and most satisfying new broadcast sitcom of the season.
  45. Saul picks up plot speed rapidly at the end of the first hour. The beginning, however, is so deliberate it’s almost hypnotic.
  46. The reason to watch 24: Live Another Day isn’t for ideology. It’s to get caught up in a fast-paced, high-powered adventure played out by people we care about.
  47. This seven-part National Geographic series on the world's great migrations turns out to be riveting--not just beautifully filmed, which you would expect, but bursting with great stories about how diverse creatures have learned to survive in a world where everyone is fighting for the same food, air, turf and water.
  48. Creator Timothy Sexton has woven this story with a master’s touch, making us care about the characters even as we fear for their lives. Or, for that matter, all our lives.
  49. So we have solid setups here for tales of love, redemption, friendship and the same championship dreams that made Rocky an American icon.
  50. It has woven well-crafted murder dramas and, beyond that, given us wonderfully complex lead characters who go way beyond the light banter, gruff exterior and “will they/won’t they” tease of most TV cop teams.
  51. Though it’s not the series’ strongest script, the two fine actors can still extract every nuance from it.
  52. The show's droll and mostly apolitical humor fits the exaggerated characters well, it's still got a good fast rhythm, and the five major players work well as an ensemble.
  53. Celebrity Apprentice has 18 new celebs this year, including several who will make you roll your eyes. Then in the end, the show once again somehow ends up being good clean fun.
  54. What makes for a mixed stewardship of the Roman Catholic Church can also make for lively television.
  55. The Synths start to act in unexpected ways, and several ominous developments warn us that artificial intelligence must be controlled and directed. What stays with us about Humans, though, are the reminders of all the little ways things will change once we hand part of our lives over to robots.
  56. They [The writers] deliver.
  57. Hell on Wheels plays with big ideas about redemption, sin and forgiveness, so Cullen’s detour and the religious component of other subplots fit the show’s tone and direction. But at some point it would still be good for Cullen to get back into the track-and-crossties game.
  58. For outlining the way Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan and Henry Ford literally shaped the America in which we still live, this special stands as tall as Rockefeller Center.
  59. Shirley MacLaine will get most of the attention for playing fashion legend Coco Chanel in this smart-looking and solidly crafted new Lifetime biopic premiering Saturday night.
  60. The writers skillfully interweave a visit from famed French designer Jeanne Lanvin with plots against Harry, postwar workplace gender tension, family betrayal and the aftereffects of shellshock to create, by the end of the season’s first episode, the looming shadow of catastrophe.
  61. It’s still the kind of show that makes TV viewers reach for phrases like “golden age of television drama.”
  62. Tuesday night by plunging its characters deeper into a web of crisscrossing dramas that suggest the law and politics ultimately come down to soap operas. Whether it's true or not, The Good Wife makes the theory entertaining to explore.
  63. Like most of the best cable shows, Murder in the First strips the production and the cast down to the essentials, then executes them well.
  64. The adventure is good, the characters are better than good, and the playful, often insulting repartee is someting you might hear from college buddies on holiday in Cabo. These Musketeers are worth a bite.
  65. At times, the show feels almost as dense to viewers as the case feels to the characters. It’s got an inherent intrigue, though, and even before we fully understand the mystery, Kruger has us rooting for Cross to solve it.
  66. Despite living on pay-cable, Homeland also doesn't feel obliged to create explicit moments just because it can. But it's also possible it's just keeping something in reserve--a lot like its compelling characters.
  67. Touching, funny and smart.
  68. Just the beginning scene, which lasts almost six minutes before anyone says a word, will plunge everyone right back into a world where there may be no way out.
  69. Superb performances by Toby Jones as Hitchcock and Sienna Miller as Hedren keep the story alive and moving.
  70. Chasing Life walks a line itself, staying away from sad, but stopping short of sentimental. Ricci makes the balance work, reminding us that a story of a girl with cancer can also be the story of a girl.
  71. It's broad, accessible comedy - the kind of show where you aren't sure what to expect, but once you sit down, you keep watching.
  72. Charlotte Rampling makes Dr. Evelyn Vogel troubling and vaguely creepy, which probably isn’t what Dexter needs. She also opens up a dialogue on whether a psychopath like Dexter might be part of nature’s deliberate design, the human version of alpha predators. So we’ve got the philosophical and we’ve got the visceral as we count down to the last hours.
  73. There are a lot of good laughs here, and they are not the result of Larry David changing anything about the show or his character, who is the show. He'd still trip his mother to get the last seat on the bus.
  74. [Holder and Linden are] fascinating to watch as they work around Holder’s lazy partner and strong new characters who include a brilliant psychopath about to be executed.
  75. As with "Mad Men," we all recognize the workplace dynamic here. And as in "Mad Men," it's satisfying to see it dramatized in such a fresh and knowing way.
  76. The show pays more attention to relationships we care about, hints at a sensible number of new ones that show some promise, and thus doesn't rely on obscure medical mysteries to carry the whole dramatic burden.
  77. Margulies puts a powerful combination of cold fury, bewilderment and tenacity into Alicia Florrick, the wife of a disgraced Chicago politician in a new series that readily admits it ripped itself from the headlines.
  78. It’s worth watching even when it’s not easy.
  79. Some Dexter fans have thought the show meandered around for the last couple of seasons as if it were waiting for something to happen. Now it has.
  80. If you can make it through Monday's first episode of Fox's much-anticipated new suspense drama 'The Following,' you have some intense, but high-quality, television ahead.
  81. "Eureka" is the sort of show that makes you want to see more of almost every supporting player - and, of course, of the show itself.
  82. Gunn, a calming and classy fixture on Bravo's "Project Runway," has it--and that's why his new show for the same cable channel works.
  83. Me, I have enough fun just watching the show, thanks. Interactive is too much work. With so much going on in "Push, Nevada," I'm happy with active.
  84. Once you accept the quiet rhythms and deliberate pace of The Bronx Is Burning, though, it begins to pay off.
  85. It's an entertaining TV show that easily could translate to a terrific comic book.
  86. It's not surprising television writers would find television funny. It's gratifying they can make it funny for us, too.
  87. The rest of the drama, though, suspends disbelief much more successfully. The acting, by both men and women, is quite nuanced and well-observed. After a few episodes, you feel their pain, and hope that it is eased.
  88. While the crime itself is only moderately intriguing, its real function is to let viewers see what each of these women does, how they work together and how they talk to each other.
  89. Parker turns in a performance bubbling over with vitality and believability, even when the script itself strains credulity or when individual lines of dialogue slip too much into sitcom punch lines and rhythms.
  90. After one hour, we not only care about the patients - but care quite a bit about the doctors.
  91. As good a cast as you'll find anywhere on TV.... But in the end, the decisive question may be whether inner TV provides as much material as the inner White House.
  92. Everyone in the pilot makes a solid first impression.
  93. ABC's dense, unblinking and occasionally surreal tale of plane-crash survivors on a strange tropical island moves into its fourth season Thursday with its compass still in good working order.
  94. While some of "JAG" is cerebral and character-driven like "Columbo," other portions are jazzed-up enough to feel like a high-tech Navy recruiting film. [22 Sep 1995]
    • New York Daily News
  95. It's got a way to go to become a polished program, but made a very solid and affable first impression.
  96. But far too much of the show - a story about a wealthy hospital patron and her dog, for example - struggles far too obviously to convey a quality of eccentricity that in the end comes across simply as lame...Unless the show finds a way to maintain its quality when Braugher is not on screen, ABC's promos will remain half-true hype.
  97. For some reason the series’ use of recent real-life stories seems more problematic this time around, starting with a subplot on the birth of Occupy Wall Street.... [But] The Newsroom still has a lot to recommend it. McAvoy and McHale remain strong characters.
  98. Even though "Ugly Betty" tends to go for very broad humor when subtlety would serve better, it is easily watchable.
  99. A program that gets stronger as we get to know its characters better, and the quality of the cast helps tremendously.
  100. The format is unusual, and the ending of the premiere nicely surprising - but the element that pushes this show into the potential hit category is Neil Patrick Harris.
    • New York Daily News

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