New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,264 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 How to Get the Guy: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 524
  2. Negative: 0 out of 524
524 tv reviews
  1. As you would expect from a show entering its 19th season, the acting and the pacing are strong and confident. L&O has always been smart enough to stick with what works.
  2. The best moments in Wednesday night's chat between Elvis Costello and Elton John, which are good enough to recommend the show for fans of both men, serve up small but sparkling musical pleasures.
  3. It's a fun ride and Wyle has gotten a little better each time. That's why it's a shame there apparently won't be another.
  4. The show's long break seems to have rejuvenated its story lines, in which intense, rapid-fire action plays out against the backdrop of a complex, methodical geopolitical chess game.
  5. Mainly, underneath the sitcom setups and witty banter, this show moves to the pulse of the ad game. The mystique and power of raw ideas push this story as surely as they push the characters of "Mad Men."
  6. Bryan Cranston's Walter remains one of the best-played characters on television, and he's surrounded by a strong cast that, knowingly or unknowingly, plays off his desperation.
  7. The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency takes some time setting itself up Sunday night, but those who stay with it will be rewarded with the funniest and most charming lady detective series since "Murder, She Wrote."
  8. It's still not a show for everyone, since 99% of the action is conversation. But it's intelligent conversation, and the problems of the patients, including Weston, are multilayered and compelling.
  9. Harper's Island is an elaborate horror movie, a twentysomething slasher flick with a really good wardrobe, a first-rate cast and 13 weeks worth of twists and subplots.
  10. Tuesday night’s premiere packs a lot of trash into 42 minutes, between the quips about “jewelry whores” and an almost pathological concern with whose “bubbies” are and aren’t authentic. It plants the first seeds of drama, too.
  11. The likable Pete and Myka are a classic match, bickering until they need to stop and work together, which they do. Artie provides both comic relief and a reminder that their job is difficult and dangerous--point also made by Artie's boss, Mrs. Frederic (CCH Pounder). Not too much new here. But there's nothing wrong with taking the old and doing it well.
  12. To say we actually like any of these characters would be stretching it. But we're drawn into their lives, and as it starts its second season, Sons of Anarchy can't be left out of any conversation about the golden age of cable drama.
  13. Fortunately, someone finally grabs hold of the wheel and steers it back to where it belongs, as one of the great character dramas of contemporary television.
  14. There are a lot of good laughs here, and they are not the result of Larry David changing anything about the show or his character, who is the show. He'd still trip his mother to get the last seat on the bus.
  15. Other complications arise as well, and Laurie is superb in this episode, carrying scenes so strongly that for long stretches the viewer will forget the absence of his regular colleagues entirely.
  16. Admit it: You've probably never considered the potential impact of sleep deprivation on a serial killer. Well, the creators of Dexter have, and the results make for highly entertaining television.
  17. With 19 episodes remaining in this season, there's plenty of time for all this drama to intensify and the characters to sort themselves out as good and not-so-good.
  18. It's a brand new ballgame. It looks to be a winner.
  19. That plot crystallizes through a pair of two-hour episodes, Sunday and Monday nights, and at times it crystallizes slowly.
  20. Damages is a show that has always required a viewer's full attention, and the rewards are there for those who do.
  21. The shadows are deep enough over "Breaking Bad" that it's hard to imagine a ray of hope or light shining through anywhere. But the actors and writers are so good that, like Walt, we'll keep looking for it.
  22. It's hard to imagine reinventing the concept of the doctor show. But in a way, that's what Private Practice sets out to do in its new-look second season Wednesday--and it doesn't do a bad job.
  23. Based on the first episode, the team seems to work about two cases at a time, and while neither of tonight's feels wildly creative--one warns of the downside to an intense religious upbringing, the other catches an elected official in an ethics scandal--both are engagingly told, with humor and little twists.
  24. Add strong performances by a dozen major characters, starting with Claire Foy as Little Dorrit, and you've got the kind of production television is often accused of having abandoned.
  25. What Southland has, already, is its own swagger, a get-outta-my-way style of moving and talking that says it's going for the raw edges we see on cable shows like "Breaking Bad." Southland pulls it off, too. If Thursday night's premiere episode is an indication how it plans to roll, it's a keeper.
  26. As viewers, we're less interested in the destination than the ride, and this one starts out feeling like fun.
  27. A splendid new addition to pay-cable's stock of dark comedies that keep a human heart beating behind the laughs.
  28. The good part is that the drama should be fun to watch for us. And for the guy at Pizza Shack, too.
  29. It's broad, accessible comedy - the kind of show where you aren't sure what to expect, but once you sit down, you keep watching.
  30. The new musical-comedy drama Glee dresses like "High School Musical" and has the heart of "Porky's." That's a compliment.

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