New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,384 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Extras: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 I've Got A Secret: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 573
  2. Negative: 0 out of 573
573 tv reviews
  1. About as smart, charming and clever as comedy can get. [25 Sept 2001, p.100]
    • New York Daily News
  2. The truth is that at this point, the complex subplots and nuances of all the backstories make it more satisfying for longtime fans than for recent drop-ins.
  3. State of Play is one of the best dramas about a newspaper since "All the President's Men." [16 Apr 2004, p.131]
    • New York Daily News
  4. The language, the acting, the themes - everything in "Deadwood" is good as gold. In TV entertainment terms, maybe even better.
  5. He has always been wrapped a little tight but now he's about to explode, and Chiklis plays it beautifully, making it sound as if he must measure every phrase so that just opening his mouth doesn't release all the frustration in a nuclear blast.
  6. Nashville plays as a smartly written and well-appointed soap.
  7. For its first three seasons, Rescue Me, starring Denis Leary as a haunted New York firefighter, was one of the funniest dramas on television. This season begins with a slight shift: It's now one of the most dramatic comedies. [13 June 2007, p.75]
    • New York Daily News
  8. Painful as that journey may be, the show and these actors hit all the notes that make us want to come along.
  9. Season one set the bar high. Season two clears it.
  10. This reincarnation of The Normal Heart raises all the right disturbing questions.
  11. The Affair looks to be a bit more cerebral than some of Showtime’s other star shows. That makes it no less compelling.
  12. Weiner’s ability to capture “human” set Mad Men apart at the first beginning and shows no sign of faltering at the second.
  13. It's still not a show for everyone, since 99% of the action is conversation. But it's intelligent conversation, and the problems of the patients, including Weston, are multilayered and compelling.
  14. Sondheim comes off as distant and a bit cool here, reluctant to make eye contact and often speaking with a professorial air even when he’s talking about himself. But what most people want in Sondheim isn’t a drinking buddy. It’s a musical composer, and in that he qualifies on all counts.
  15. The Killing marks another bull's-eye for AMC in presenting complex, literate, well-crafted television.
  16. A brooding, brilliantly written and crafted cop show. [25 Oct 1996]
    • New York Daily News
  17. Bryan Cranston's Walter remains one of the best-played characters on television, and he's surrounded by a strong cast that, knowingly or unknowingly, plays off his desperation.
  18. Short scenes [are] designed to suggest we just walked in on random real people. It's a raw look that is, nonetheless, a look. It also, inevitably, says scripted TV drama.
  19. It’s not always comfortable or reassuring. It’s just a strong story told by a strong cast.
  20. While some of their "family values" are perverse and illegal, most are rooted in the same principles embraced by the straightest arrows in town. That's what makes them more than motorcycle thugs and makes their show worth the discomfort it sometimes takes to ride with it.
  21. The show's droll and mostly apolitical humor fits the exaggerated characters well, it's still got a good fast rhythm, and the five major players work well as an ensemble.
  22. The droll office comedy Better Off Ted could have quickly turned into a one-joke bore. Instead, it sails into its second season tonight as one of the best sitcoms on television.
  23. A strong documentary that examines a sympathetic yet imperfect character while admitting it's impossible to pin down his precise impact on history.
  24. Sleepless in America plays like a meticulously researched horror documentary.
  25. John Maggio traces the Italian-American tale in a loving but clear-headed way.
  26. Some of the resulting tech and geek jokes feel accessible to all. With others, we feel like we need a password, and that could limit the long-term appeal of Silicon Valley. But if it only settles in as niche humor, it’s solid there.
  27. A few things in the first episodes of season five, which kicks off Tuesday night, feel a little disjointed. Denis Leary remains a magnetic lead as New York firefighter Tommy Gavin, and the show still has inspired moments.
  28. Justified has reached the point where we know some of its tricks. But thanks to Leonard and Olyphant and writer Graham Yost’s fine balance of humor and mayhem, it’s still an hour worth looking forward to.
  29. Sorting out the sins and sinners in the final eight episodes of Boardwalk Empire promises to be as intriguing as it will be intense.
  30. It still has the same problem, which is exactly where it can take itself, but the ride remains as delightful as the bright shiny colors with which the show lavishly decorates itself.

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