New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,265 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 How to Get the Guy: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 524
  2. Negative: 0 out of 524
524 tv reviews
  1. Weiner’s ability to capture “human” set Mad Men apart at the first beginning and shows no sign of faltering at the second.
  2. A brooding, brilliantly written and crafted cop show. [25 Oct 1996]
    • New York Daily News
  3. Nashville plays as a smartly written and well-appointed soap.
  4. The Killing marks another bull's-eye for AMC in presenting complex, literate, well-crafted television.
  5. Season one set the bar high. Season two clears it.
  6. The show's droll and mostly apolitical humor fits the exaggerated characters well, it's still got a good fast rhythm, and the five major players work well as an ensemble.
  7. The droll office comedy Better Off Ted could have quickly turned into a one-joke bore. Instead, it sails into its second season tonight as one of the best sitcoms on television.
  8. Short scenes [are] designed to suggest we just walked in on random real people. It's a raw look that is, nonetheless, a look. It also, inevitably, says scripted TV drama.
  9. Some of the resulting tech and geek jokes feel accessible to all. With others, we feel like we need a password, and that could limit the long-term appeal of Silicon Valley. But if it only settles in as niche humor, it’s solid there.
  10. While some of their "family values" are perverse and illegal, most are rooted in the same principles embraced by the straightest arrows in town. That's what makes them more than motorcycle thugs and makes their show worth the discomfort it sometimes takes to ride with it.
  11. State of Play is one of the best dramas about a newspaper since "All the President's Men." [16 Apr 2004, p.131]
    • New York Daily News
  12. A few things in the first episodes of season five, which kicks off Tuesday night, feel a little disjointed. Denis Leary remains a magnetic lead as New York firefighter Tommy Gavin, and the show still has inspired moments.
  13. A strong documentary that examines a sympathetic yet imperfect character while admitting it's impossible to pin down his precise impact on history.
  14. Justified has reached the point where we know some of its tricks. But thanks to Leonard and Olyphant and writer Graham Yost’s fine balance of humor and mayhem, it’s still an hour worth looking forward to.
  15. Season four continues the good work of past seasons by building on all the trouble Jackie has heaped upon herself.
  16. Goldberg’s documentary doesn’t dwell on the what-ifs. It focuses on what a remarkable woman did accomplish, just by making us laugh.
  17. It still has the same problem, which is exactly where it can take itself, but the ride remains as delightful as the bright shiny colors with which the show lavishly decorates itself.
  18. [Creator Julian Fellowes] never been afraid to have characters we like do things we don't like. That continues in season three, which finds plenty of new ground even as it inevitably begins treading back over some old.
  19. The most inspired aspect of this year's primary plot is that Jack is a man over the edge, not on it. [28 Oct 2002]
    • New York Daily News
  20. Despite soapy moments, it offers a more honest portrayal of contemporary high school life than a "90210."
  21. The new guest cast is uniformly solid....The whole show is now on its own for the first time, since the previous two seasons were adapted from an Israeli series. That series ran for only two years, so this new In Treatment will have to work from scratch. What it has scratched out so far is impressive.
  22. The Dust Bowl sounds like a dry subject, no cheap pun intended, and Burns works hard to humanize it by talking with some of the now-elderly people who made it through.
  23. Poehler has great skill at delivering outrageous lines in a droll deadpan. That sets the tone for a cast, including Lowe and Scott, with similar abilities. Too many of the sketches, though, cross that fine but visible line between bemused absurdity and slapstick.
  24. Doubtless there always will be some of the Gen. Patton mentality, that a soldier with no physical wounds must be "yellow" if he or she can't just shake it off. Wartorn argues, powerfully, that blaming the victim is not our finest hour.
  25. It’s all done with brilliant imagery and crisp production that differs from Sagan’s primarily because the technology just keeps getting better.
  26. Writer/director Hugo Blick skillfully walks the hairline between a well-paced adventure thriller and a psychological study that gives us enough time to appreciate the nuances of the character we're watching.
  27. This isn't the best role TV can give Parker, but it'll do for now. [13 Aug 2007]
    • New York Daily News
  28. Fans of the comic book and first-rate psycho-horror may form a large enough audience to make this a hit. Those not in those groups may want to start by taking a deep breath.
  29. The women are the more critical characters, in any case, and Rashad, McDonald and Lathan give the show all the power it needs for its uncomfortable and frustrating yet in some ways hopeful ride through the life of a black family in 1950s Chicago.
  30. As in past seasons, a few moments this year may seem made for TV. But this is a show that's scored way more than it has faltered, and the opening episode suggests that streak will continue.

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