New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 588 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Vinyl: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Liz & Dick
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 324
  2. Negative: 0 out of 324
324 tv reviews
  1. While this fourth chapter in the saga of Litchfield Penitentiary gets off to a bumpier start than usual, it ends on such powerful notes that if you’ve ever been a fan, you simply have to view all 13 episodes.
  2. Thanks partly to the writing, but mostly to Elba's performance, Luther rarely comes off as one of those swaggering CBS crime-show smarty-pantses, dumping wisdom on subordinates--and that's good, because even at its sharpest, Luther feels a bit too CBS for my taste.
  3. Meanwhile, some remarkable television has been made. To report on a new generation of young warriors raised on hip-hop, heavy metal, and video games, Wright went to Iraq as Michael Herr before him had gone to Vietnam, like Dante to hell with a cassette recording of Jimi Hendrix.
  4. While you watch--which you will, since this show is addictive--it’s as if Riverdale is growing up fast before our eyes, like a clever, winking teenager who’s already grown-up enough to know she should keep her deepest secrets to herself.
  5. What sells the antics is the chemistry between its leads and the fun they’re so clearly having together.
  6. All in all, this is an impressive piece of work, absorbing provided that you're willing to meet it on its own storytelling terms.
  7. It’s smartly made, but it also doesn’t linger terribly long on details, including character development. ... If nothing else, there is something satisfying about seeing Sutherland as our president.
  8. There are times when things feel just a little off. Perhaps because of pressure to meet the high expectations set by season one or just some minor challenges finding its footing in season two, the writing occasionally comes across as forced, especially with regard to the Rebecca-Josh-Greg triangle.
  9. Queen Sugar takes its sweet time moving through a moment, lingering where other series tend to sprint, and it is generous with its searching close-ups of faces and hands and its images of the Louisiana countryside at dawn and dusk, an enchanted-seeming landscape of furrowed fields and gnarled, kudzu-covered trees. At its most navel-gazing, the show feels like Parenthood by way of Eugene O'Neill. But tell me you don't want to watch something like that.
  10. Vice News Tonight is an intriguing effort--not new, exactly, but newish. The “hangin’ out doin’ journalism” approach is easy to mock, but this new program is engaging and smart.
  11. Best of all, we seem to be done with the weakest element of the series, those abusive-hillbilly flashbacks. Instead, we've been left with a Madonna-whore set of blondes: all-embracing Anna and her icy counterpart, Betty of the Little White Nose in the Air.
  12. Although generally witty, always absorbing, and invariably violent, True Blood isn’t really a big surprise until its fifth hour.
  13. With British accents and a refreshing dash of homoeroticism, it works nicely for a midsummer binge.
  14. People of Earth deserves praise more for its high concept and intelligence than for its ability to generate laughs. It’s the kind of show that doesn’t make you LOL so much as chuckle softly while admiring its subtext.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like any good reality show, Kid Nation's strengths are in its characters, and the most remarkable aspect of these characters so far is their intellectual superiority to adults on reality shows--they use big words and make funny jokes!
  15. It still feels, moves, and thinks like the Community you know. It has changed, yet it hasn’t. Its essence remains.
  16. In these last innings, as The Wire ties up its gnarled threads, it also makes its most daring departure yet, introducing yet another institution, and a brand-new cast of characters to disappoint us.
  17. It's a refreshingly un-miserable show, and while it covers a range of human emotions and identities, none are "murderer" or "super murderer."
  18. For the most part, this is a light, bouncy service comedy in the spirit of The Phil Silvers Show, Gomer Pyle, USMC, and Stripes, It's a high jinks–heavy but psychology-driven show that wants to please a general audience while also seeming halfway credible to viewers who've served in the armed forces or know somebody who has.
  19. The 100 is better than it has to be, a little more exciting and surprising and intense.
  20. The early arc of season two is as interesting as anything on TV in ages--absorbing, complicated, textured. The composition of the show feels more stable, too.
  21. The pilot can be alienating, and not in a good way. It's often too schematic, too obvious.... The next three episodes get incrementally weirder, stronger, and more original, to the point that you forget to measure this Fargo against its namesake, or against any of the Coens' masterworks, and simply enjoy the odd, sour, frightening, occasionally splendid thing in front of you.
  22. Outlander is never more engrossing than when a scene emphasizes Claire's reactions as she's forced to decide whether to say what she really thinks of a man's behavior or assertion or recitation of policy, or err on the side of silence.
  23. This is also a lovingly wrought series. Every frame is intelligently composed, lit, and decorated, every camera move is purposeful and sometimes startling.
  24. Tthe most promising aspect of the series is the challenges it could provide to its cast, if the writing continues to sharpen.
  25. Crazy Ex-Girlfriend has a very difficult to-do list in terms of maintaining its tone while finding a little more character clarity than the pilot managed--plus the musical numbers. Rebecca's self-absorption is almost thrilling, but the show itself falls prey to it, so we don't quite get a clear read on the supporting characters in the first episode.... The craziest thing about Crazy Ex-Girlfriend is how boldly itself it is when so many other shows are attempting to be each other.
  26. The Night Manager knows exactly what kind of entertainment it wants to be: escapism with just enough of a dark edge to pass for art. And it stays as focused on its mission as Pine does on his.
  27. There could be a precipitous drop in quality in the next few weeks, for all we know. But what’s onscreen here is intelligent, sensitive, and sure-footed, and altogether promising.
  28. Far From Finished isn’t an instant classic on the order of Bill Cosby: Himself or his stand-up albums Revenge, Why Is There Air?, and Wonderfulness. It’s more like a pencil sketch by a master painter or a late film by Woody Allen or Clint Eastwood.
  29. San Francisco shifts shapes nicely, and there’s sufficient tension in the pilot to keep our nerves strung out, and since executive producers Kevin Falls and Alex Graves are West Wing veterans, it’s no surprise that the characters pass for adults.

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