New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 712 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Dr. Ken: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 414
  2. Negative: 0 out of 414
414 tv reviews
  1. This is light years removed from being a perfect TV show, but it already shows signs of being a great one.
  2. Halt and Catch Fire has officially shifted into the early 1990s, exploring the days when the internet was still being invented and, in the process, cementing its place as one of the most confident shows on television. ... Like its four protagonists, it is damn good at what it does. If you don’t take the time to appreciate it while it’s still here, you might regret it.
  3. It follows the Slow TV template recently perfected by the likes of American Crime and The People vs. O.J. Simpson, giving each scene maximum space to breathe, often more than it needs. But the net effect is hypnotic, like reading a fat crime novel filled with memorable characters and atmospheric details.
  4. Sherlock is a wonderful series. Just thinking about it makes me smile.
  5. The brilliance of the writing and world-building on The Good Place is taken to another level by its cast.
  6. Season two of the show is more enjoyable than season one because, for long stretches, it barely remembers what it's about, plot-wise, and enters that trancelike comedy zone where some of the best sketch comedy resides--a place of one-damn-thing-after-another inventiveness.
  7. The first four episodes sent out for review become stranger and less “realistic” by the hour, not to mention more stereotypically HBO-like (artfully arranged corpses; drug-thug posturing and handgun-waving; gratuitous T&A) and less concerned with the case that Cohle and Hart are allegedly trying to solve. But the show’s time-shifting structure is so painstaking that even when True Detective spirals into lurid madness there still seems to be purpose behind it.
  8. This series is Burns doing Guthrie, bringing a lifetime of experience and craft to bear on a story of people struggling through hard times. He's picking up a guitar and telling us a story--a great one.
  9. After delivering one of last fall’s most assured, instantly delightful debuts, in take two, the series solidifies its status as the most intellectually engaging comedy on television.
  10. This is the sort of series that makes difficult things seem easy, so easy that you often don’t realize how artful it is until you think back on it.
  11. Season three, so far, feels like it’s returning closer to that core mission after a second season that felt slightly less focused. Transitioning, for Maura and those who love her, is a process. Transparent season three shows us that the work is nowhere near done.
  12. It doesn’t just have a setting and a story, it has a philosophy and a vision of life. This is so rare in any art form that the show’s less-than-subtle aspects (and there are many) feel like features rather than bugs. ... Loosely based on Simien’s 2014 same-titled independent film but superior to it in almost every way.
  13. For all its gore, gunfire, and criminal nastiness, it's a joyous show; even when the characters are scowling, the show seems to be grinning at you.
  14. Splendid television.
  15. In its own sweet way, this is a landmark show.
  16. Rick and Morty won't get us any closer to a workable definition of Harmon's genius, but at least it clarifies that the unhinged quality that Community once had wasn't accidental.
  17. It lets you simultaneously laugh at and with the characters, and feel justified for laughing, then ashamed, and then the pendulum swings back again; this is a much messier and more fascinating set of reactions than what sitcoms typically evoke.
  18. Freed of the constraints of thirty-minute or one-hour formulas, the episodes are luxurious and twisty and humane, radiating new ideas about storytelling.
  19. If Master of None isn't perfect, it's awfully damn close. Along with recent shows like Catastrophe, Transparent, and Broad City, Master feels like the point of contemporary half-hour narrative television.
  20. Episodes is great--the sharpest sitcom debut this year. Among other excellent qualities, it's actively funny, with none of the dramedy lumpiness that spoils other half-hour offerings (bad camp, faux-energy badinage, heavy-handed sentimentality).
  21. To watch any engrossing drama is to feel for fictional people the way we feel for real-life friends. Even when they piss us off, we wish them the best.
  22. The performances are superb from leads on down to cameo players, and in addition to showcasing a sureness of purpose that you’d expect from good actors who’ve been given strong material, you also feel a sense of elation in individual scenes.
  23. The second season of UnREAL continues to work from that same multilayered template [of season one], but with even more confidence and a greater sense of ambition.
  24. It's these deeper questions [Deciding to live the day-to-day performance of an ideal, a belief, an emotion, a set of principles, a faith?] that give the action and melodrama a bit of existential heft, and redirect our vicarious enjoyment away from fantasy and back towards reality.
  25. The Sinner proceeds according to its own internal logic, and while I would quibble with the presentation of one or two bits of information in the first couple of episodes, there are no moments that feel egregiously contrived or unfair to the audience.
  26. The dialogue is funny, but performers like Martin and Higgins, who are both fantastic, really make it sing.
  27. Curb Your Enthusiasm takes its own internal dare and does somehow manage to make us care about this world-class sufferer of impacted pettiness, with his endless bickering about the thermostat, the etiquette of blow jobs in cars, the horrors of vacuum-packed plastic.
  28. It should still be said, however, that pretty good Burns is pretty great, provided you more or less agree with his take on things.
  29. The show has a knack for Godfather-style plots and counter­plots, as well as for sixties Hammer-horror violence that doles out gore and suffering strategically: a dollop of blood here, a severed head there. There’s a bracing wantonness to the writers’ inventions here.
  30. Its mix of escapism and confrontation of life’s hardships make it a pleasure that comes with no guilt. Like the strong-as-hell female at its center, even when it exaggerates, it never stops aiming for honesty.

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