New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 158 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Van Lear Rose
Lowest review score: 10 Charmbracelet
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 158
  2. Negative: 22 out of 158
158 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Timberlake and the Neptunes work hard at creating memorable songs, an admirable undertaking given the pathetic state of songwriting in pop music. But little more is expressed in songs like "Señorita" and "Take It From Here" than flowery notions of romance or brusque come-ons.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a larger sense, the shock is that Belle and Sebastian have grown out of their awkward adolescence. And they sound all the more interesting for having done so in full view of their fans.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    And though the smarter songs (the more personal "If I Had It All," the easygoing "Fool to Think") benefit from the concision, the group's newfound musical sharpness isn't that of a world-class bar band but that of an outsize stadium act -- all grand gesture and larger-than-life lyrics. Sometimes, as on "I Did It," the band recaptures the spirit of seventies rock in all its innocent fun. Other times, especially on the cloying, overdramatic "The Space Between," it recaptures only those moments that involve holding a lighter high above one's head.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    True eclectics like De La Soul and A Tribe Called Quest seek out samples and inspiration -- in jazz, electronic music, even rock -- while Jean merely traffics in superficial gloss.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The rapper's nicotine-scarred voice does sound bluesy, and his raps are serious without being arch like Beck's. The album's sound -- a marriage of classical string arrangements and sparse drum beats -- makes the guitar stomp of his rap-rock peers seem more one-dimensional than ever. But Everlast's blues are one-shaded -- nothing on Eat at Whitey's approaches the grim fatalism of the Geto Boys' "Mind Playin' Tricks on Me," Eminem's "Rock Bottom," or even Snoop Doggy Dogg's "Murder Was the Case."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Buckcherry now captures the decadence of seventies and eighties hard rock better than anyone who actually lived it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite its faults--and there are many--Ray Ray is a startlingly inventive record.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Massacre is as frustratingly uneven as Get Rich or Die Tryin’, but it’s longer and messier.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At its very best, "Superman Inside" for example, Reptile is as expressive as anything he did in the nineties. The other half of Reptile is a series of oddball genre digressions and cornball balladeering.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you give it the chance, though--and if you’re not already a member of the tribe, it takes perseverance--Bedlam sinks its fangs into you.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    American Supreme proves that Suicide can reach backward and still remain ahead of the pack.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Utterly raw and rocking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Along the way, though, Aerosmith slips into the stylized studio excesses of a professional producer (it might also be their only album to have strings on half the songs), and the ballads the band does deliver are as corny as anything it's ever done.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And though his search for dance-floor transcendence gives the album emotional heft as well as a sense of pacing, the best songs on Halfway are the ones that look straight into the gutter and dive right in, corny catchphrases and all. "Ya Mama" -- which will likely do for "Push the tempo" what "The Rockafeller Skank" did for "the funk soul brother" -- is sped-up, silly, and, in the end, one of the more memorable songs on the album. It's enough to make an auteur look back fondly on his car-commercial period.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    What a curse Jay-Z's ideas represent: Nearly everything about The Blueprint 2 sounds like a retread, including its title.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Her songs still revolve mostly around the adolescent hell of looking right and pleasing jerky guys, a shtick that would be old if Hatfield, well into her thirties, didn’t genuinely sound as if she were still living through it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    All fifteen tracks are one-dimensional disses and dismissals of scantily clad women, vengeful boyfriends, and the group's assorted doubters.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Goddess is the only forward-looking project by a Rolling Stone since the band flirted with disco on "Miss You."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Intermittently successful...[t]oo often, his faithfulness turns into meticulousness, resulting in an album that's as formally impressive but as snooze-inducingly detailed as a special-effects-addled blockbuster.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You can’t help but get lost in Minogue’s music.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Morissette seems unwilling to step into unfamiliar territory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    18
    Moby is no auteur, a fact made painfully clear by his terrible new album, 18, which revisits the already derivative territory of Play.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What really makes Ghosthorse and Stillborn worthy of a jump for joy is CocoRosie’s transformation from self-conscious oddity into an actual songwriting force.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Nelson's voice, silky enough to sing standards, lacks the vocal grit for the blues, and he rarely works up enough energy to milk the titular cow. Most of these songs are better suited for a supper club than for a juke joint. [Oct 2, 2000]
    • New York Magazine (Vulture)
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The songwriting is scattershot... and the sound strains for punk-on-a-budget but is as three-chord conservative as other retro acts like Rancid and the Distillers.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Filthy Philly rapstress ropes in famous mates, but falls short of rap superstardom.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Trots out an unceasingly uninteresting parade of pop personalities singing against a patina of Latin music so drained of ethnicity and soul that it makes Herb Alpert seem like Sun Ra by comparison.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The songs, engaging as they are, sound cursory, as though Lee wrote them while riding the bus on his way to the studio, staring at his watch and an empty notebook.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Psychedelia is really only compelling when ego takes a backseat to kaleidoscopic music, and the Gallaghers are, of course, incapable of such a gesture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Young's surprisingly conservative new album, Are You Passionate?, is simply frustrating, and worse, often as risk-averse as a CSNY reunion.