New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,605 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The King's Speech
Lowest review score: 0 A Sound of Thunder
Score distribution:
6,605 movie reviews
  1. The Tillman Story purports to be an exposé of the cover-up of the death by friendly fire of the Army Ranger and one time NFL star Pat Tillman. But, provocative and colorful as the film is, it does the very thing it denounces -- massaging the facts to seize Tillman for a political agenda.
  2. Bob Nelson’s original script, a sort of unlikely cross between “The Last Picture Show’’ and “The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek,’’ offers a biting satire of Midwestern life that Payne sometimes allows to border on condescension.
  3. Four stars simply aren't enough for Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire, which just may be the most entertaining movie I've ever labeled a masterpiece in these pages.
  4. This is the sort of movie that gets called “hallucinatory,” but it is strongly grounded in the New York in which 99 percent of us live. Fleischner gets his uncanny effects simply by showing what this city looks like to a child who has a different filter.
  5. The latest episode of this ongoing masterpiece of reality TV -- which every seven years revisits a group of English people first interviewed as 7-year-olds in 1964 -- is every bit as enthralling as the earlier ones.
    • New York Post
  6. Lynch's first G-rated feature, turns out to be one of the year's best films...a wonderful surprise.
  7. A spare, exquisitely realized masterpiece about faith, redemption and boxing that beautifully illustrates his longtime philosophy that "less is more."
  8. One of the year's most engaging films.
  9. Ruefully funny, beautifully acted comedy of manners.
  10. A haunting, superbly made film. But it's also an unrelentingly sad and depressing experience.
    • New York Post
  11. As much a study of prehistoric art as archaeology, this documentary brings in experts to speculate about the mysterious artists who made these paintings, some quite elaborate and others intriguingly abstract.
  12. How to Survive a Plague, while a shaggier-structured documentary than many, is a heart-wrenching portrait of one of the saddest, most heroic chapters in American history.
  13. Veteran French star Michel Piccoli is superb as an aging actor named Gilbert Valence.
  14. Tremendously affecting on several levels, In the Bedroom is must-see viewing for anyone who complains Hollywood doesn't make movies for grownups.
  15. Ten
    Breezy, entertaining and enlightening.
  16. Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
  17. If there's an awkward moment, it's the scene in which the monks take part in a sort of Last Supper, drinking wine while Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake" plays in the background. You keep waiting for Natalie Portman to twirl into the room.
  18. There’s an exhilarating sadness to it all that amounts to cinematic poetry.
  19. A sentimental, whimsical autobiography.
  20. With Japan facing a new nuclear crisis, this beautifully composed and acted heart-wrencher -- couldn't be more timely.
  21. This superb documentary about the Catholic Church's worst pedophile scandal is in many ways far scarier than any fiction.
  22. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  23. A blue-chip Oscar contender that's also a rousing popcorn movie, Ben Affleck's Argo offers plenty of nail-biting thrills as well as funnier scenes than you'd ever imagine possible in the grim context of the Iran hostage crisis.
  24. A sensitive and subtle meditation on aging, loss and bereavement.
  25. Atriumph on almost every level. It is breathtakingly stylish, wonderfully acted and its three interrelated tales of the "war" on drugs are brilliantly structured to form a cohesive, powerful whole.
  26. Isn't quite as accessible or as deeply moving as his masterpiece, "All About My Mother." It's a tad too self-consciously a work of art for that. But it's still a must-see for anyone who's halfway serious about film.
  27. A thought-provoking documentary that would go well on a double bill with Richard Linklater's fictional "Fast Food Nation."
  28. It's a sharply written, unforgettably directed character study with brilliant performances by Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams - far more intimate but no less intense than director Paul Thomas Anderson's Oscar-winning last film, "There Will Be Blood.''
  29. So terrifically entertaining, it would be a shame if it didn't inspire a companion piece on New York.
  30. The 34-year-old Meadows has assembled an effective cast, especially newcomer Thomas Turgoose as Shaun and veteran Stephen Graham as Combo.

Top Trailers