New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,963 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Good Night, and Good Luck.
Lowest review score: 0 The Strip
Score distribution:
6,963 movie reviews
  1. Perplexing but pleasing.
  2. This is one of the best serious films about homosexuality ever made, but though it's sad and sobering it's still only a rough draft of a great movie.
  3. In The Kid With a Bike, Belgian filmmakers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne offer a sly but finally banal update of the Italian neorealist classic "The Bicycle Thief."
  4. About Elly shows that the ethical dilemmas of ordinary adults can, with this level of talent, become as gripping as any thriller.
  5. Everything a summer blockbuster should be but rarely is - a whip-smart, slam-bang piece of entertainment where we deeply care about the fate of the central characters.
  6. Caouette has used art, wit and a huge heart to forge his experiences into an unqualified masterpiece.
  7. Fast-moving, psychologically savvy.
  8. Roger Ebert makes an unusual candidate for a documentary: He was a writer, which isn’t cinematic, and not the swashbuckling kind. He didn’t go to war zones, just movies.
  9. The surreal images, offbeat jokes and pointed human-rights allegory make this an altogether different experience from most American animation. It’s dreamy, poetic and not to be missed.
  10. Herzog tries to make sense out of the blond-haired young man, who looked an awful lot like Kinski.
  11. The year's best foreign-language movie an absolute must-see.
    • New York Post
  12. A crowd-pleasing baseball movie for people - like me - who don't like baseball movies...Probably the finest baseball movie since "Bull Durham".
  13. These elisions give an odd feeling to a film so long in the making. Crewdson's work ultimately begins to seem less enigmatic than he is himself.
  14. A must-see for Miike's passionate legion of fans. But even action buffs who've never seen any of his films before will be drawn in by this masterful exercise in cinematic butchery.
  15. Though far too long for its wisp of a plot, this stylish film has a nerve-cinching grip that makes it more alarming than most horror flicks, let alone most movies about a couple having a tiff.
  16. Eventually turns somber, with stark depiction of mass graves and suffering refugees. The final scene will break your heart.
  17. The result is a magnificent feast for the eyes and brain.
  18. It's a must-see for Daniel Day-Lewis' charismatic, subtly shaded performance as Lincoln - and an even richer one by Tommy Lee Jones.
  19. Poetic but tedious and all but plotless.
    • New York Post
  20. The Tillman Story purports to be an exposé of the cover-up of the death by friendly fire of the Army Ranger and one time NFL star Pat Tillman. But, provocative and colorful as the film is, it does the very thing it denounces -- massaging the facts to seize Tillman for a political agenda.
  21. Bob Nelson’s original script, a sort of unlikely cross between “The Last Picture Show’’ and “The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek,’’ offers a biting satire of Midwestern life that Payne sometimes allows to border on condescension.
  22. Four stars simply aren't enough for Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire, which just may be the most entertaining movie I've ever labeled a masterpiece in these pages.
  23. This is the sort of movie that gets called “hallucinatory,” but it is strongly grounded in the New York in which 99 percent of us live. Fleischner gets his uncanny effects simply by showing what this city looks like to a child who has a different filter.
  24. The latest episode of this ongoing masterpiece of reality TV -- which every seven years revisits a group of English people first interviewed as 7-year-olds in 1964 -- is every bit as enthralling as the earlier ones.
    • New York Post
  25. Lynch's first G-rated feature, turns out to be one of the year's best films...a wonderful surprise.
  26. A spare, exquisitely realized masterpiece about faith, redemption and boxing that beautifully illustrates his longtime philosophy that "less is more."
  27. The film’s slightly confusing ending doesn’t spell anything out, but that’s all right: We’re left sitting in the dark shivering, reassured there are still some directors who can leave us well and truly creeped out.
  28. That the story has largely gone untold is a shame, and Kennedy (daughter of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy) has done a service to the country in reminding us.
  29. Ruefully funny, beautifully acted comedy of manners.
  30. A haunting, superbly made film. But it's also an unrelentingly sad and depressing experience.
    • New York Post

Top Trailers