New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,445 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Blood Simple.
Lowest review score: 0 Wirey Spindell
Score distribution:
6,445 movie reviews
  1. Lynch's first G-rated feature, turns out to be one of the year's best films...a wonderful surprise.
  2. A spare, exquisitely realized masterpiece about faith, redemption and boxing that beautifully illustrates his longtime philosophy that "less is more."
  3. One of the year's most engaging films.
  4. Ruefully funny, beautifully acted comedy of manners.
  5. A haunting, superbly made film. But it's also an unrelentingly sad and depressing experience.
  6. As much a study of prehistoric art as archaeology, this documentary brings in experts to speculate about the mysterious artists who made these paintings, some quite elaborate and others intriguingly abstract.
  7. How to Survive a Plague, while a shaggier-structured documentary than many, is a heart-wrenching portrait of one of the saddest, most heroic chapters in American history.
  8. Veteran French star Michel Piccoli is superb as an aging actor named Gilbert Valence.
  9. Tremendously affecting on several levels, In the Bedroom is must-see viewing for anyone who complains Hollywood doesn't make movies for grownups.
  10. Ten
    Breezy, entertaining and enlightening.
  11. Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
  12. If there's an awkward moment, it's the scene in which the monks take part in a sort of Last Supper, drinking wine while Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake" plays in the background. You keep waiting for Natalie Portman to twirl into the room.
  13. There’s an exhilarating sadness to it all that amounts to cinematic poetry.
  14. A sentimental, whimsical autobiography.
  15. With Japan facing a new nuclear crisis, this beautifully composed and acted heart-wrencher -- couldn't be more timely.
  16. This superb documentary about the Catholic Church's worst pedophile scandal is in many ways far scarier than any fiction.
  17. The climactic shootout, which goes on for 15 minutes and has an astronomical body count, is a masterpiece of its kind.
  18. A blue-chip Oscar contender that's also a rousing popcorn movie, Ben Affleck's Argo offers plenty of nail-biting thrills as well as funnier scenes than you'd ever imagine possible in the grim context of the Iran hostage crisis.
  19. A sensitive and subtle meditation on aging, loss and bereavement.
  20. Atriumph on almost every level. It is breathtakingly stylish, wonderfully acted and its three interrelated tales of the "war" on drugs are brilliantly structured to form a cohesive, powerful whole.
  21. Isn't quite as accessible or as deeply moving as his masterpiece, "All About My Mother." It's a tad too self-consciously a work of art for that. But it's still a must-see for anyone who's halfway serious about film.
  22. A thought-provoking documentary that would go well on a double bill with Richard Linklater's fictional "Fast Food Nation."
  23. It's a sharply written, unforgettably directed character study with brilliant performances by Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams - far more intimate but no less intense than director Paul Thomas Anderson's Oscar-winning last film, "There Will Be Blood.''
  24. So terrifically entertaining, it would be a shame if it didn't inspire a companion piece on New York.
  25. The 34-year-old Meadows has assembled an effective cast, especially newcomer Thomas Turgoose as Shaun and veteran Stephen Graham as Combo.
  26. Can be summed up in one word: style.
  27. Not for all tastes, but it demonstrates Loach's skill as a poet of gritty semi-documentary filmmaking.
  28. The real star of The Son isn't lead actor Olivier Gourmet. It's the back of his neck, which the camera obsessively focuses on throughout this difficult but rewarding Belgian drama.
  29. The profanity-laced but witty and literate dialogue by William Monahan ("Kingdom of Heaven") is delivered by a brilliantly chosen cast, almost all of whom are operating at the very top of their game.
  30. This environmentally themed, very loose version of Hans Christian Andersen's "Little Mermaid" is never going to be mistaken for Disney's musical of the same name.

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