Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,662 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Picket Fences: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Zombie Apocalypse
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1106
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1106
1106 tv reviews
  1. "The Nine" may well be the best of the crop - smart, clever and especially wise to the ways of this genre - but the challenge remains the same. This is work - admittedly often pleasurable work, but come 10 p.m. next Wednesday, we've got to do it all over again.
  2. A little too Lemony, but genial, well-produced and presumably faithful to the Lemony Snicket vision.
  3. [Showrunner and creator Sam Esmail is] a Kafka in the director’s chair, who sees alienation where everyone else sees a Facebook “like.” It’s as compelling and timely a vision as there is in a primetime series at the moment, and darkness is the price of admission.
  4. Marvel’s Jessica Jones succeeds in all sorts of ways, especially the one that counts most: Ritter just might be the shrewdest casting move of the season, maybe several seasons, because she so fully inhabits the multidimensional Jones.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This handsome, moodily shot movie liberates the play from the confines of the tiny apartment with almost too many scenes on the bus, in a bar and, most chilling, in the back room of a beauty shop where the neighborhood abortionist boils forceps.
  5. Still very high quality, and still a tiny bit dull.
  6. "Dr. Katz" is a very funny show. [4 Dec 1995]
    • Newsday
  7. GLOW is terrific. ... GLOW is about female empowerment, and couldn’t be otherwise, but there’s a little more going on--female relationships, and the unique ties that bind, even when frayed by a patriarchy that profits from fraying them.
  8. Who else but Larry David could have imagined that a "Curb" largely without the glorious Cheryl Hines could conceivably be funnier? Or that her absence might work as a comedic plot foil for one of its major story arcs? He did, and that's genius.
  9. It is amusing in the right places.... It's also reasonably smart without being show-offy. Tuesday's launch, meanwhile, is a nice reminder that nothing--at least that good stuff--has changed.
  10. Uneven, intelligent, weird, sometimes funny (more often not)--and almost consistently engaging.
  11. Gorgeously acted, written, paced, structured and conceived, "Damages" remains one of the best shows on TV--and maybe the most enjoyably addictive.
  12. Hip, clever and hilarious...A sparkling little character study, quirky comedy, relationship drama and all-around delight. [5 Oct 2000, p.B43]
    • Newsday
  13. This remains one of the best shows on TV, and (as usual) not for all tastes.
  14. This is TV's best and brightest at the moment, and a wonderful tribute to New York's resurgent TV production industry.
  15. With [Mike O'Malley's] fluid scripts, these sharp actors hit not just three-pointers but also free throws.
  16. Best show of the season? Call me crazy, but it's a loopy-twisted-serpentine whodunit revolving around a whip-smart teenage girl...So let's recap. Engaging star, cool characterizations, witty scripts, meaty backstory. What's not to like? Only that networks always cancel deliciously offbeat gems like this. Let's hope UPN doesn't actually want to be a "real" network, after all. [22 Sept 2004, p.C01]
    • Newsday
  17. Lots of first-rate performances--including by a dog--but some of the stories are a little bloated or unfocused.
  18. While the story is briskly and engagingly told, with some key players debriefed, there's not a lot new here. It's a very good beginner's history.
  19. This unique series is about life's inscrutable mysteries and the search for answers. The town of Jarden--and the Murphys--appear to be rich with possibilities in that search.
  20. Cox remains a very engaging lead, and her supporting cast is rock solid.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    If you loved it before, you'll love it again. "Auf"-ully good.
  21. Still good, still not for everyone, and almost gone for good.
  22. I haven't enjoyed a new cable comedy so much since the first episode of "Larry Sanders." [15 Oct 2000]
    • Newsday
  23. Watch for any length of time and you may--as I did--have the eerie if not unpleasant feeling that you've been teleported to a decent network cop show from the 1970s.
  24. You get the sense that the filmmakers' vision and Wright's are never quite in sync--or perhaps are in sync too perfectly.
  25. Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.
  26. Fascinating, disjointed, moving, tiresome, elegant, tacky, fast, slow. There’s a little something for everyone here.
  27. She’s a terrific and effortlessly funny actress who establishes vivid characters with vivid lives. But Sam Fox obviously required a bigger reach, and Adlon accomplishes that here.
  28. For Mel Brooks lovers everywhere (you know who you are), but it's on the light side.
  29. As bizarre as things can get, Torchwood still feels more like sci than fi, and more ego/id than alien vs. human. The Gwen character in particular radiates intelligence, and empathy, and curiosity, about what's out there and what lies inside Jack. We can't help but share her, um, enthusiasm.
  30. That the whole pilot doesn't collapse into a pile of rubble is due to Rodriguez--or maybe because Jane is so confoundedly odd you want to see what happens next.
  31. Solid opener, compelling premise, good cast and one major hole.
  32. About as good a Community restart as anyone could have possible hoped for.
  33. Even film school snobs like me can learn a thing or 10 from Moguls & Movie Stars. The breadth and depth of information rushing through each hour is astonishing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A pleasant but routine sitcom that uses that decade of significant social change as a hook...The Wonder Years handles its period details - clothing, hairstyles - well. The look of the '60s is rendered with an authentic, evocative feel. Like virtually every sitcom, it has its banal moments, and here and there the gags fizzle. [30 Jan 1988, p.11]
    • Newsday
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dream On is almost there. It still needs some work, though. [6 July 1990, p.43]
    • Newsday
  34. Six million zombiephiles watched the finale of the first season and those 6 million will not want to miss Sunday's opener, which is excellent and appropriately disgusting.
  35. Unlike "Daddy Dearest," it's a warm, compassionate, story about a human problem the baby boomer generation sooner or later will be dealing with: what to do with geriatric TV set as they get on in years. It's not a big busy ensemble sitcom like "Cheers," more a one-man show for Grammer. But it's cozy, involving, socially relevant and marvelously amusing. [16 Sept 1993, p.93]
    • Newsday
  36. I mostly loved Game of Thrones, but occasionally grew a little weary of it as well. (And just to answer the obvious question, this is not a small-screen "Lord of the Rings.")
  37. My fear is that the show may be too Alaska. TV is not ready yet for Nanook of the North, even if he has a New York accent. [10 July 1990, p.9]
    • Newsday
  38. Quiet, intelligent, worth checking out.
  39. It's like "M*A*S*H" with just the helicopters showing up and no laughs. "E.R." is all trauma; you never get to know enough about the patients or get involved with them. It's just treat, release and move on. [18 Sep 1994]
    • Newsday
  40. There's pleasure in every frame here--from terrific new cast additions (Molly Parker, David Glennon) to richer D.C. subplots. It all works, and it is all addictive.
  41. Like Seinfeld, Carmichael’s humor is sometimes about locating what’s funny in our narcissism, or his. But this episode wouldn’t work as well as it does if there wasn’t a moral, wrapped in a truth.
  42. Orange" is a slog, where minutes seem to stretch into hours, hours into days ... and the drip, drip, drip of prison time becomes its own reality.
  43. The show can be messy and confusing--a headlong rush to who-knows- where-or-why at times. But those clones keep it grounded.
  44. Driver['s character] is so self-righteous in her advocacy, so insensitive to her impact, that a little of her goes a long way. And there’s more than a little of her here.
  45. The busy season premiere quickly constructs an intriguing seesaw of aspirations and emotions, and it's self-contained enough to sell itself to even Nip/Tuck newcomers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seinfeld's gentle humor is easy to take. Unlike other current comedians, such as Andrew Dice Clay or Sam Kinison, Seinfeld isn't angry: He's more awed by the wonder of it all. [13 May 1990, p.13]
    • Newsday
  46. This evocative hour doesn't lionize Steinem, but simply lays out what happened.
  47. I would say give them a chance. What else are you going to do for a half-hour after "Frasier"? [2 Oct 2001, p.B27]
    • Newsday
  48. An addictive show, with great cast, excellent writing.
  49. There are lots of other small touches--or technical flourishes--along with new cast members, notably Nina. Otherwise, best of luck finding anything radically different because there isn’t all that much that’s changed.... This is a “win-win”--for HBO, public TV, its most iconic series and those kids.
  50. Silly, gross, soapy, mysterious, intriguing, exotic, erotic True Blood is fun. Even more fun this season.
  51. Mr. Dynamite instead works best as musical biography, only fitfully as a comprehensive one.
  52. Yes, this story’s kind of been told before, in various places, and in various forms over various decades--but with not nearly as many vulgar words called into service here.
  53. If all this sounds like "24" has been hijacked by public policy wonks or Shakespeare profs, don't worry. Your show very much remains your show.... It's just that your show got a little smarter.
  54. A particularly fine new FX drama marred only by a tepid pace in the pilot. But pace and story pick up in subsequent episodes.
  55. Mann and HBO deserve much credit for profiling these extraordinary people. It's just too bad the execution tends to be a little long-winded or not nearly as expansive as it should be.
  56. Not perfect, but pretty darned good, and Moreno and Machado are a formidable comedy team indeed.
  57. I've seen four episodes; they're all good.
  58. There are real pleasures with "The Hour," but the hour (actually, about an hour and 15 minutes Wednesday night) ticks by far too slowly.
  59. They've translated the radio show's aural mosaic to the visual medium so effortlessly in this first season of six half-hours, we hope Showtime orders more of this life we all can recognize.
  60. Some wild twists, but you've seen a variation before on one of them. Nevertheless, the Patty Hewes story is almost over, and in Close's hands, it's still compulsively watchable.
  61. So far no amnesia bouts or cougar attacks. And no Kim! [9 Jan 2005]
    • Newsday
  62. Rest easy. Scrubs is just fine (with all cast members, except Jenkins, back), though the opening episode is superior to the follow-up.
  63. Another Discovery/BBC beauty, but short on answering obvious questions.
  64. Sontag, simply put, was a very interesting person, who fully inhabited some interesting times--which this film captures. But as to that genuine, lasting impact? Who knows: Regarding is so busy trying to capture this busy life, that it never gets around to an answer.
  65. Tonight's first episode is highly recommended for Ed Begley Jr. fans who may have wondered what Dr. Victor Ehrlich has been doing since "St. Elsewhere." [20 Aug 1990, p.9]
    • Newsday
  66. White Collar is not original. But White Collar is enjoyable.
  67. At times, Luke Cage feels like a series in search of a story, or a series intent on drawing one out, scene by chatty scene, over 13 episodes. (Six were available for review; I watched the first two, sampled the rest.) A cast this good, especially a Luke Cage this good, should compensate.
  68. Uneven, but the core strength remains--a sitcom that embraces the uncomfortable, and sometimes the unmentionable.
  69. Girls' moment is almost up, but this lovely, gossamer line ["I want to write stories that make people feel less alone than I did, to laugh about the things that are painful in life.”] reminds us why that moment was so special.
  70. Sunday's episode is exceptional, marred only in a few spots by padding that's inevitable with these supersized episodes.
  71. There's real thought behind The West Wing, a blessed exhilaration in this increasingly apolitical medium. For those who remember when '70s TV comedy took on the world, this is a welcome arrival. True, the pilot takes some fish-in-a-barrel potshots at sanctimonious evangelists, in Sorkin's speechifying manner from "Sports Night." But it also delivers that series' satisfying depth of reflection and rich characterization. Eventually. Once we know who these people are. [21 Sept 1999, p.B27]
    • Newsday
  72. [The] tightly crafted pilot abjures the urge to make its own judgments on good/evil, sanity/delusion, isolation/connection, conscience/capitulation.
  73. The problem with Jackie is that split personality--drama or comedy. What's funny here is funny, like last season's final seconds. There aren't enough moments that remind you when to laugh.
  74. A sentimental new series whose flaws are fairly easy to forgive. [26 Sept 2003, p.B03]
    • Newsday
  75. It's almost a shrug of an opener, a bit diffident, a bit unfocused (not unlike Brett, in his less lucid moments). But Togetherness does gets better, and funnier.
  76. Even at six hours, this tends to be more impressionistic, and less bound to a strict historic timeline.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No doubt ABC has a hit here. The show's funny, and this is something you rarely get to say about a sitcom. [16 Oct 1988]
    • Newsday
  77. This is a singular vision throughout, written and directed by the team of Lodge Kerrigan and Amy Seimetz. (She also plays Christine’s older sister.) Their intense focus draws a disquieting portrait of a peculiar personality.
  78. Suffice it to say, keep the kids away, but you will laugh - and feel guilty about it afterward.
  79. The Gus Vant Sant-directed pilot of what is easily the most important project in Starz history pulses with the sort of corruption that absolute power sires.
  80. Michael is a clinically interesting personality type who is profoundly unempathetic, until such times as he is very empathetic. The wonderful creative trick of The Office is knowing exactly the right moment to humanize Michael.
  81. Pure joy and the tribute Nichols finally deserves.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The material is high in laugh content, but sometimes the handy wonders of animation tempt the makers of "Dr. Katz" to illustrate jokes unnecessarily. [28 May 1995]
    • Newsday
  82. Based on six episodes for review, Kimmy remains Kimmy, which is about as good as the news can get for fans.
  83. A nice balance of 60-40 character drama and medicine. "Homicide" heavyweight Braugher is intense once again, yet smart enough to keep sharing the screen with a strong ensemble. [10 Oct 2000]
    • Newsday
  84. Good start with a pair of shockers. Beware.
  85. The best new show of the year. [28 Dec 1994]
    • Newsday
  86. Saul is lighter and brighter than "Bad," and--particularly with Sunday's launch--often very funny.
  87. [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
  88. As real as real gets, invaluably adding human understanding to a hot-button topic.
  89. The Closer may be the most comfortable old shoe on all of television; slip it on and be assured of no blisters. In fact, the cast (and not just Sedgwick) is so competent, the characters' tics so familiar; and the format and formula so firmly etched in "ceeement" (as Brenda might say) that it all feels almost too comfy.
  90. All very much and happily remains the same--and unless you are an absolute die-hard insane fan who will find something to complain about here ... there really isn't all that much to complain about whatsoever.
  91. With his 2000 show, HBO’s “Killing Them Softly,” as another baseline for the best of Chappelle’s TV standup, this one’s right up there, too--not quite its equal, but close.
  92. This is an intelligent overview, with the consistent and important theme that medical "paradigms" shift and change.
  93. While a bit deliberately paced, a good start, with (as always) an excellent guest-star roster.

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