Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,322 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Masters of Sex: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Woops!: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 864
  2. Negative: 0 out of 864
864 tv reviews
  1. Michael is a clinically interesting personality type who is profoundly unempathetic, until such times as he is very empathetic. The wonderful creative trick of The Office is knowing exactly the right moment to humanize Michael.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The material is high in laugh content, but sometimes the handy wonders of animation tempt the makers of "Dr. Katz" to illustrate jokes unnecessarily. [28 May 1995]
    • Newsday
  2. A nice balance of 60-40 character drama and medicine. "Homicide" heavyweight Braugher is intense once again, yet smart enough to keep sharing the screen with a strong ensemble. [10 Oct 2000]
    • Newsday
  3. Good start with a pair of shockers. Beware.
  4. The best new show of the year. [28 Dec 1994]
    • Newsday
  5. Saul is lighter and brighter than "Bad," and--particularly with Sunday's launch--often very funny.
  6. [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
  7. As real as real gets, invaluably adding human understanding to a hot-button topic.
  8. The Closer may be the most comfortable old shoe on all of television; slip it on and be assured of no blisters. In fact, the cast (and not just Sedgwick) is so competent, the characters' tics so familiar; and the format and formula so firmly etched in "ceeement" (as Brenda might say) that it all feels almost too comfy.
  9. All very much and happily remains the same--and unless you are an absolute die-hard insane fan who will find something to complain about here ... there really isn't all that much to complain about whatsoever.
  10. This is an intelligent overview, with the consistent and important theme that medical "paradigms" shift and change.
  11. While a bit deliberately paced, a good start, with (as always) an excellent guest-star roster.
  12. At turns it's sad, poignant, bitter and funny (yes, more than enough turns in that direction).
  13. The best unscripted show on commercial television this season, which you may correctly point out is faint praise; but in this case, it's not.
  14. Thurgood feels more "important" than dramatic. Part of it is Stevens' then-I-did-this structure, more focused on biographical bullet points than the flesh-and-blood human behind them. And part of it is Fishburne, who despite coiled power--his Ike Turner in "What's Love Got to Do With It" was Oscar-nominated--resonates here as a cool character rather than a fiery one.
  15. It's less the Plot Events that ring true here than the well-played little side moments and background squabbles, the simmering resentments and recriminations, the emotional tugs-of-war.
  16. The season's premiere represents pig-in-the-python storytelling--there's so much to work through, so many details, stories, characters and time dimensions to attend to, that after a while this all starts to feel like a very full meal.
  17. [A] rewardingly seasoned new drama series that's practically indistinguishable from the acclaimed feature film, except that it's better.
  18. No matter where you stand on the death-penalty debate, this is must-watch revelation--and, thanks to Herzog, tense and suspenseful drama.
  19. McKinley and its denizens feel just a little too cliched, the emerging romantic entanglements a little too forced, the female characters--notably Terri and Sue Sylvester--just a little too mean-spirited. Still, it's a great cast.
  20. Smart newcomer with a pair of leads that turns The Americans into a likely winner.
  21. As a character with a sartorial preference for canary yellow, Kemper's Schmidt comes into focus intensely and immediately. She pops off the screen, and pleasingly so. Her series, less so.
  22. This four-hour gem is exquisite from start to finish, rife with the texture of its place and time, rich with human understanding expressed in everyday articulation and small gestures.
  23. Can Rescue Me wrap all this up in the short time left? I hope so, but this episode feels like so much temporizing.
  24. Congenial.
  25. The Beales' story--predictably, sadly--descends into mutual recrimination, then near madness. It's all rescued by two stunning performances.
  26. Yes, "black-ish" can be fiercely funny, sharply observed, and unfailingly good-humored about the racial divide. But just beyond that glossy surface is a serious and even compelling undercurrent.
  27. The most thought-provoking new series of the year on TV. [6 Oct 1999, p.B39]
    • Newsday
  28. "Dexter" knows what it's doing, and savors its skill immensely.
  29. This impressive fact-based debut from cultural journalist turned director Nelson George keeps us captivated simply by honing in tight on the character of its people, sketching in fine detail not just their admirable strengths but their all-too-human flaws.

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