Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,206 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 London Calling [25th Anniversary Legacy Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2,206 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dream is a go-for-broke collection that not only creates and sustains a hi-fi drowse-pop drama throughout its 10 beguiling songs, but comes across like a logical and gorgeous extension of all the band’s previous dreams.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's what you hope for from your favorite artists in your best moments -- evolution, a little difficulty and, especially, something new.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even more than those artists' fantastic new albums, Deerhoof vs. Evil musically captures the essence of this hard-to-fathom-but-entirely-possible future.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If 1998's Car Wheels on as Gravel Road stands as the high point of Williams' self-involved period, Blessed just as masterfully traces the bursting heart and smoldering soul of her humanity. This is as deep and true as the song form gets.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Paper Airplanes features a stellar set of songs that should continue to expand upon Alison Krauss' already-great reputation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For now, Pecknold and his bandmates are important cogs in the indie-music scene - with a few more albums akin to Helplessness Blues under their belts, they may soon fit just as nicely into the canon of American folk music.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It retains the beautiful melancholy of For Emma, but in nearly every way, it's just more. More layered, more diverse, more interesting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rise Again is an indispensable recording from one of the world's most important living artists.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Marissa Nadler hints at larger tragedies and losses, implying an overarching break-up narrative that gives each song added force.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her dexterity in juxtaposing genres, infusing her swooping jazz-singing with near-gospel fervor, kittenish moans and shameless spoken exhortations is commanding.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Harrow & The Harvest is simply one of the richest, most expansive roots albums to be released in some time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This album not only surpasses its predecessor but raises the bar for any band, indie or otherwise, mining the past for inspiration.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nothing feels even remotely stale, and many of these tracks manage to actually improve upon their original counterparts--no small feat, considering the fact that these are some of the finest songs ever written.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Sessions are a great listen when you have time to sift through it all, and the package gives hardcore fans more than enough material to immerse themselves in.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every song a casual fan would know is here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They may have just crafted a masterpiece.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is the details that make Prophet explode.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Release Me, his final album of an almost 30-year career for Curb, finds him resolutely steadfast in his excellence and eclecticism.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A sweeping confession of sanctification, embrace and glory, this is deliverance personified.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    On Out of the Game, Wainwright does not disappoint: whirling string sections and a chorus of women exhale grief behind the brash songwriter who knows no shade of blue that eludes him.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An impressive concoction of stark minimalism. From its cryptic cover art to its ethereal soundtrack, The Sister is Nadler's journey to self-assurance, in which she paints an intricate portrait of longing and reflection, blurring its sullen edges with shades of hope and prosperity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Banga is a song cycle that expresses a synthesis of all of her strengths to form one of her strongest albums.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A lean rock record [imbued] with import beyond the sting of the smart, seething tracks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Redd Kross 2.0's incredible debut.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There aren't many records like this one, and if you give it time and it catches you, you'll probably still be listening to it when the deal goes down and your own ship comes in.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    LaVette deepens their meaning with a slow-burn commitment to the lyrical nuance and the emotional resonance in the melodies.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This collection is the band's tightest and most cohesive, and they do so without losing any of the grit.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Psychedelic Pill may be the best album Neil Young has ever done with Crazy Horse.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No bonus tracks, no live filler--no reason to mess around when the perfection was in the pacing.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If there’s ever been an album that deserves the lavish, borderline-unnecessary reissue treatment, it’s this pop behemoth.