Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,928 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Frequency
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3928 movie reviews
  1. Floats before your eyes like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The surprise is that, fitted together, these pieces make a completed picture.
  2. Things get a little tricky by the end, but it's the sort of trickery that's immensely satisfying.
  3. Sly, sophisticated and surprising.
  4. Marwencol is about Hogancamp and his miniature alter-ego, about his photographs and his creative process. But it is also, on a deeper level, about how we process our experiences - good and bad, violent and mysterious - and how we try to build safe places in our lives.
  5. A taut, tricky thriller.
  6. It's complicated. And it's fascinating.
  7. A crushingly sad, beautiful film.
  8. Director Manoel de Oliveira's minimalist, incomparably moving I'm Going Home ranks with John Huston's "The Dead" as one of the great works by a director at his twilight.
  9. Gripping, powerful, heart-breaking.
  10. Kore-eda, deploying a Western pop score by the Japanese indie-rock band Quruli, just lets these kids be kids.
  11. Simply put, it's terrific.
  12. Disturbingly good. The writing and the performances are such that as things go from bad (sad motel-room affairs) to worse (a 4-year-old gone missing), the film's characters get inside your skin, your soul. It's enough to make you want to cry.
  13. The mosaic of cases and caseworkers is like a season of "The Wire" distilled into two hours.
  14. Insightful, funny-sad memoir of divorce, intellectual style and emotional rebirth.
  15. Whatever number it is chronologically on the P&P parade, Wright's film ranks first in verve. Quite simply, it is the essential P&P.
  16. If Munich raises disturbing issues about Jewish-Arab relations, past and present - and how can it not? - it is also an absolutely riveting tale of the hunt and the hunted.
  17. Moviegoers of a certain age may feel as though they are watching a lost Bertolucci film.
  18. 13 Tzameti is cut from the same cloth as the humans-hunted-for-sport classic "The Most Dangerous Game" - and from that early talkie's many subsequent remakes and rip-offs, including John Woo's "Hard Target."
  19. Splendid, smile-inducing fun.
  20. Zodiac is a reproach both to those dedicated to unscrambling "The Da Vinci Code" and to those hooked on forensic crime shows where all the evidence leads to a tidy conclusion. That Zodiac's manhunt is inconclusive makes it all the more haunting.
  21. A kind of deadpan soap opera - but one that, despite its high melodrama and wicked humor, delivers a real emotional wallop.
  22. Not just a great sports movie, Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 captures a pivotal moment in recent history.
  23. This story of two very old souls who suck on O negative Popsicles is, in many ways, more about the life-sustaining force of music than any hankering for blood.
  24. Hopped-up and electrifying. The soundtrack is wall-to-wall and propulsive.
  25. This is the kind of unusual but involving picture that's ripe for a Hollywood remake - but while you're waiting for the Sandra Bullock-Ethan Hawke edition (it's a good post-movie game: coming up with your own casting ideas), Read My Lips is well worth checking out.
  26. Clean, director Olivier Assayas' spellbinding study of a junkie trying to get her life in order so she can reclaim custody of her child, avoids the pitfalls, brilliantly.
  27. This long (nearly three hours), revelatory movie is both a thrilling adventure about endurance and survival, and an elegiac examination of centuries-old tribal culture, fast-fading in the new millennium.
  28. Through Herzog's eyes it is a desolate, strangely beautiful frozen Edenish hell where the planet, having shaken out its pockets, lets the loners, fanatics and cosmologist-crackpots fall to bottom.
  29. After Clooney, who gives a sterling performance as a tarnished figure, the standout performance belongs to Wilkinson, a geyser of manic eloquence. Also quite fine are Swinton and Sydney Pollack.
  30. Quiet, watchful, out for himself, Sorowitsch is a complicated figure - neither hero nor villain, and certainly no fool. The Austrian actor Markovics is riveting in the role; he is wiry, anticipatory, his eyes darting with intelligence and worry.

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