Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,904 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Lebanon
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3904 movie reviews
  1. For its amusing premise, Fanboys is scarily flat.
  2. For a film that strives so hard to show the sheer messiness of real people's lives, Burning Plain does have an impossibly neat ending.
  3. The playwright, actor, director and drag queen (yes, his bewigged and be wild Madea makes a brief and totally gratuitous appearance in his new film) knows how to give human dimension, and a dimension of humor, to the cliches and stereotypes.
  4. Keener makes this sometimes inert but always intimate tale of love and ambition burst with dynamic energy. Keener doesn't just have attitude, she has maditude.
  5. One moment it's farcical comedy, the next it's gruesome melodrama. The movie never finds the right tone.
  6. A coming-of-age film that has the jaunty mood and egg-cream flavor of a Philip Roth memoir.
  7. Bobby Jones plays out much like a round of golf - slow, old-fashioned, tediously long, and lacking in drama.
  8. A mid-point twist is particularly ridiculous, and in an attempt to reconcile this turning point, the final act of the movie becomes a mess.
  9. For soccer aficionados, Kicking & Screaming boasts some fairly cool play, courtesy of Alessandro Ruggiero and Francesco Liotti, two kids who play "the Italians."
  10. Hesher has its genuinely affecting scenes, but too much of the time it feels false and shallow.
  11. Someone should check Joe Carnahan for performance enhancement drugs. Smokin' Aces, the wild ride of a movie he scripted and directed, is so pumped up, manic and mayhem-packed that it practically shoots sweat off the screen.
  12. A likably energetic star vehicle for English sports god Vinnie Jones.
  13. Secret in Their Eyes is notable for its top-tier cast - Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman, and Chiwetel Ejiofor are the leads - and for its utter lack of credulity and good sense.
  14. The glaring weakness of Country Strong is James, underwritten and ambiguous, more like Kelly's pimp than her manager.
  15. The trailers already have given away the "surprise" cameos in The Expendables, so try not to blink when Stallone goes into a church (shades of John Woo) to meet his mystery boss, played by a bald-pated, trademark smirking Bruce Willis.
  16. There's nothing Disneyesque about this bomb except the forced levity of its musical score.
  17. Directed by Clark Johnson in an efficient and occasionally exhilarating style that points to the Emmy-winner's TV cop-show pedigree ("Homicide," "The Wire," "NYPD Blue").
  18. There is no shape or pacing to Daniel Petrie's movie. It's like a bottle of soda left uncapped. So thus a story that promised effervescence ends up being flat.
  19. A loving ode to screwball comedies from the Golden Age of Hollywood that never approaches the films it pays homage to.
  20. The 3D effects are of a gimmicky 1956 vintage, with hands thrusting from the screen to give the illusion of reaching out and touching the audience.
  21. This one has some originality, even though it unfolds like Ingmar Bergman's divorce melodrama "Scenes From a Marriage" - without the marriage.
  22. A casualty of its own clumsy storytelling.
  23. A meditation on guilt, remorse and redemption -- is unrelentingly heavy.
  24. What this arid and arty exercise offers is the opportunity for a bunch of actors, many of them tethered to TV series, to deliver theatrical monologues pulsing with misogyny and narcissism. It's like second-rate Neil Labute.
  25. Well-intentioned if cloying, Miracles from Heaven has an appealing cast and an accessible take on spirituality.
  26. Despite the appeal of cobra-eyed Thornton and bunny-nosed Heder, Scoundrels trips early, and often.
  27. For the first half-hour I, too, demurred. And then the irresistible force that is Hugh Jackman -- or was it his swoony Leopold? -- swept me off my seat and into the movie.
  28. Not up to the freshness and inventiveness of its predecessors.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  29. While the movie is content to be merely atmospheric, the performances convince you that here are two misfits who might be a perfect fit.
  30. Though one wishes Graff's eye were as developed as his keen ear, he elicits rafter-raising musical performances from Latifah, Palmer, and Jordan that are irresistible fun.

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