Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 8,272 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Source Tags & Codes
Lowest review score: 0 Travistan
Score distribution:
8272 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Here, the band comes into their own by applying their own inspiringly distinctive, bleakly appealing sensibility to whatever ideas happen to move them.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Here, it stands behind so many other newly apparent strengths--a testament to the leaps and bounds Longstreth has made as a songsmith and Dirty Projectors have made as a band.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    You can feel roots going down and an edifice being built. Her voice has gained depth and she sings with more force and clarity, so that's part of it. And the arrangements are more judicious and draw less attention to themselves (some tracks are just harp, others add horns, strings, and percussion, but with a lighter touch). But the bigger difference seems to be the overall mood, which is expansive and welcoming.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Murphy once again shows off his encyclopedic knowledge of all things post-punk and zip-tight. But he's also swimming up some serious stuff himself, including Eno and David Bowie's sacrosanct Berlin trilogy. And against his own prediction, it's far from horrible; it's actually pretty perfect.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    On Sir Lucious Left Foot, Big Boi does something even more difficult: He gives us a great album that sounds nothing like any of the great albums he's already given us. From where I'm sitting, that's an even greater achievement.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    We'll never be able to parse every lyric or tease out every technical intricacy - though somebody will probably try - but that is what Halcyon Digest is all about: nostalgia not for an era, not for antiquated technology, but for a feeling of excitement, of connection, of that dumb obsession that makes life worth living no matter how horrible it gets.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Ram is a domestic-bliss album, one of the weirdest, earthiest, and most honest ever made.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    [Graceland] was unique in its total, and totally natural, synthesis of musical strains that turned out to be not nearly as different from each other as its listeners might have expected, and the result resonated strongly around the world and across generations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    They've given us something in the present tense that, these days, feels depressingly unfashionable: An Event--an album that dares to be great, and remarkably succeeds.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Benji sounds more like Kozelek relating events instead of crafting them, which makes the continuity and reflexivity of the record feel both uncanny and the work of protracted genius.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    He’s responded in the best way possible: by producing a record that, in structure and scale, is every bit The Seer’s equal, yet possessed by a peculiar energy and spirit that proves all the more alluring in its dark majesty.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin is one of music's most assured and fully realized debuts; individually, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and John Bonham were great players, but the whole of their sound somehow exceeded the sum of its parts. But even above the instrumental virtuosity, Led Zeppelin is a triumph of production, each part clear and forceful but adding up to something even more powerful.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This streamlined set, Start Together, captures that dichotomy, archiving the Sleater-Kinney canon with care: from the ideological-punches of thirdwave feminism to their post-riot grrrl classic rock revisionism, all seven albums have been remastered and paired with a plainly gorgeous hardcover photobook, as well as the surprise of a reunion-launching 7" single.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Kendrick Lamar has proven he’s a master storyteller, but he’s been saving his best plot twist this whole time, waiting until he was ready, or able, to pull it off.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Some of the most propulsive, ferocious music of the year as well as some of the most poignant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Without a doubt, this is Les Savy Fav's defining album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Throughout Cedars, Clearlake continually find beauty in melancholy and melancholy behind beauty, while raising your hairs in reverence with occasional guitar squalls.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Insanely catchy '60s- inspired pop music in addition to sound collages, field recordings, drony ambience, cathartic noise, and outlandish production that makes Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound" look like a cubicle divider.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    One Word Extinguisher shows a range of emotional grappling usually foreign to instrumental hip-hop.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While Quality may lack the basement charms of [departed producer DJ Hi-]Tek's finest, it more than compensates by employing a funkier and more upbeat sound palate to further draw out the nuances of what is already one of the most rounded and complete rap personas in the game.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The Strokes are not deities. Nor are they "brilliant," "awe-inspiring," or "genius." They're a rock band, plain and simple. And if you go into this record expecting nothing more than that, you'll probably be pretty pleased.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Burn, Piano Island, Burn balances so perfectly between commercial appeal and untainted creativity that it's as if the band have been digitally inserted atop a mountain no man could conceivably climb.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    13
    Blur have finally found a sound to match their name.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    That Skinner is able to coax so much from a cliché-heavy, 50-minute examination of solipsism and self-pity is a tribute to his ability to reflect and illuminate life's detail.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Like all lasting records, Franz Ferdinand steps up to the plate and boldly bangs on the door to stardom. There's no consideration for what trends have just come and gone. There's no waffling or concessions for people who won't get it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    He's playing the same old marshall vs shady real-or-fake game as usual and its as interesting and complex as it ever was.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An uncompromising, energetic monster of a record.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Remarkably intricate and razor sharp compositions... more accessible than anything he's done before, yet it surpasses them insofar has he has shown the beginnings of a total sonic mastery of each subtle aspect of a work.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    None of Smith's previous records-- and in fact, very few indie releases this year-- have flat-out rocked like this one, with blaring trumpets signaling snares to exact their force beneath sweeping multitracked vocal choruses that simply won't stop crescendoing.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Maybe that's why this album has such an incredible pull: It doesn't make an atmosphere so much as a space to spend time in, and Adebimpe doesn't become a narrator so much as a witness.