Premiere's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,070 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Control
Lowest review score: 0 Pretty Persuasion
Score distribution:
1,070 movie reviews
  1. Composed of relatively few events and scenes, it's often excruciatingly tense and never less than heartbreakingly human. And as much as I admire "Munich," Shadows leaves Spielberg's film in the dust in the moral-ambiguity department. Never before seen in the States, it's already on my year's ten-best list. (April 2006 Premiere)
    • Premiere
  2. This intense film, a mix of horror, fantasy, and history that convinces on all those levels and mixes them up with dizzying brio, is a searing cinematic experience, a beautiful, terrifying vision from writer-director Guillermo del Toro.
  3. A remarkably engrossing and thoughtful picture, beautifully rendered in an artful mode of realism.
  4. The slapstick-comic set pieces involving Remy and Linguini's cooking struggles might solicit the admiration of Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati.
  5. Burnett creates an insistently poetic, devastatingly ironic world and work.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    When it works, it really works, but it's debatable whether its target audience will really enjoy anything more than the nifty robots. Which is fine, too. Robots are pretty cool.
  6. Every performance here is wonderful, and the movie abounds in moments so true as to be cringe-worthy.
  7. A phantasmagorical slab of epic entertainment that satisfies on every conceivable level.
  8. Every performer in the international cast -- Seigner, de Bankole, von Sydow (magnificent as Bauby's father), and the late Jean-Pierre Cassel to name but a few -- completely disappears into each of their roles, which I think is as much a testament to Schnabel's talents as to theirs.
  9. There Will Be Blood is, in fact, not a historical saga; rather, it's an absurdist, blackly comic horror film with a very idiosyncratic satanic figure at its core.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The credits may be silly, but the last scene is a definite tear-jerker.
  10. The Queen is a surprisingly compassionate portrait (excepting Blair's reactionary wife with the "shallow curtsy") of a rigid pragmatist in denial over the monarchy's out-of-touch dysfunction.
  11. As stomach-churning a suspense exercise as the cinema has seen since the salad days of Hitchcock.
  12. Steven Spielberg turns the pure adventure of Saturday afternoon serials into a solidly entertaining spectacle.
    • Premiere
  13. I don't think we're going to see a better--a funnier or more genuinely heartwarming, for that matter--comedy this year.
  14. Yep, this movie is basically a yakfest, but an incredibly fluid and involving one, and if you have any kind of affinity for either of the characters, you’re bound to find the picture a kind of miracle.
  15. Preaches post-9/11 family values to conservatives while appeasing liberals with ideas of tolerance and social activism.
  16. One of the funniest, smartest, most moving pictures of the year.
  17. Jarecki does a remarkable job with this easily exploitable material.
  18. While avoiding specious bromides about universality, Persepolis insists on communicating with its audience, and insists that communication and empathy are the keys to our survival.
  19. This is one of the year's most subtly moving films, and a strong affirmation of Coppola's substantial talent.
  20. von Donnersmarck delivers something extraordinary and rare: a thriller that's entirely adult in both its concerns and perspective which manages to be as thoroughly gripping as any finely tuned albeit adolescent Hollywood nail-biter.
  21. All told, while the goods that Daggers offers are choice, the movie ultimately demonstrates that too much can be, well, more than enough.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Much of this story is indeed entertaining: there's a tone of lighthearted mischievousness to the plotting and scheming of an illegal act that is essentially harmless.
  22. Borat is, in many ways, an heir to the same kind of subversion of American norms that the transvestite Divine perfected in John Waters’ early films.
  23. A wildly imaginative, hugely entertaining tour de force that asks big questions about life and love and fate while never ceasing to fully engage the viewer.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Letters from Iwo Jima isn't just the film that Eastwood wanted to make, but one that the film's producer Steven Spielberg had tried to make twice with "Empire of the Sun" and "Saving Private Ryan."
  24. Once may not boast stellar production values or elaborate dance numbers, but in its own scruffy way it captures the spirit of the genre better than any recent Hollywood musical.
  25. Catherine Keener is remarkably subtle and soulful as Capote's friend and helpmeet Harper Lee, who delivers a shocking verdict against him at the end, but the movie, as you probably will not be surprised to learn, is owned by Philip Seymour Hoffman.
  26. Mafioso isn't a straight black satire of Sicilian culture so much as a suspenseful near-tragedy leavened by the zesty, irreverent wit that helped define the golden age of Italian comedies.

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