Pretty Much Amazing's Scores

  • Music
For 707 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 A Sailor's Guide to Earth
Lowest review score: 0 Xscape
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 23 out of 707
707 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Simply put, this record has no teeth.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Blood Bitch commits the ultimate crime of all so-called concept albums: there is undeniable effort in the subject and story it was supposed to tell, but little magic in the execution.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    ...Like Clockwork is a droning, incoherent endeavor, and it simply doesn’t reward the attention it’s asking for.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The album doesn’t take nearly enough risks.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Until Ex Cops stumble upon a niche and make it their own, their career is going to be eclipsed by listeners hearing influence over innovation in their music.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    For The Future’s Void, she’s traded in the tarnished grace and drug-ravaged ten-mile stare of her past life, but it’s not always such a fair deal for the listener.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Honest is a good deal more middle-of-the-pack for a post-Yeezus 2014 than its creator wants to admit.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Only the opening stanza of “Waitress Song”--in which a major label signee fantasizes about escaping heartbreak by assuming a romanticized working class identity--is outright egregious. The rest is just innocuous.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The density of Tetsuo & Youth just could have benefitted from even the slightest dose of levity to throw its rhetoric and messages into sharper relief.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    True, not every album needs to make a statement; sometimes it’s just nice to have music to listen to with your eyes closed and your brain off. But they can do better.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The best offerings here are “Blind Faze” and “2 Shy”, Fleetwood-fashioned tracks that sway playfully, celebratory in their own modest way. The rest doesn’t hit hard enough, and doesn’t even really seem like it wants to.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    New album Hot Dreams still struggles to find a unique vantage point on its assembly of vintage sounds and gothic vibes, but fans will be more than satisfied.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Add production issues that have marred the bulk of their discography to the lack of tune and we have something that never lifts off: everything sounds mixed at the same level, resulting in mush.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, The Unnatural World is a frustrating album.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son is long on atmospherics, but woefully short on songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    As with The King of the Limbs, Beautiful Rewind is always keeping us at arm’s length, coldly allowing us to admire the craft without letting us in on the secret. It can make for a lonely listen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Good Luck and Do Your Best is dull, an affair that lacks curiosity because the answers are in front of him. None of the production is outright bad, just done before by the likes of Four Tet, Nujabes, and John Talabot.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Forest Swords' second record is simplistic on purpose, but that doesn’t make it feel less empty.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The art-rock band’s third LP Infinite House combines tentative dips into R&B and soul with a firm foundation in jittery, spindly, angular NYC rock, resulting in pop songs with a deliberately nervous, ungainly, everything-but-the-kitchen-sink feel to them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Night Time, My Time goes awry at “Omanko,” a grave misstep that verges on parody. From there on out, the record’s spotty.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Some passable stuff here, mostly confined to the second half.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Ken
    This is the kind that makes you want to go back and listen to his older stuff, if only to remind you he’s capable of wonders.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Del Rey has struggled to back up her provocations with substance. Ultraviolence was an exception, a singular breakthrough. Honeymoon is, sadly, a slip and fall after a promising stride forward.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s not breaking news that reunion music isn’t a revelation, but this album seems worse than the merely dull crop of new Owen material.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    There are over-arching problems here: the lyricism that doesn’t relate to anyone except the singer, which is especially troubling on the mostly lyric-driven “Widow’s Peak”; the lack of color from the lugubrious and minimalistic approach (excepting the vocal shading of “Joe’s Dream” and the Western-tinged “Honeymooning Alone”); the dearth of melodies, make the relatively short album get wearying over time, especially when you add the too-pristine production.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Will is a wobbly baby step from a well-honed sound to something greater. There’s not much reason to listen to it over any of her other albums, and it’s less interesting for the music it contains than the music it promises.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    It’s simultaneously daunting, exhausting, terrifying, all at the same time. It’s all a lot to take in, with not a whole lot of the Gambino we are familiar with to help wash it down.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    The supple dynamic shadings of earlier Projectors material is gone; everything’s annoyingly crisp, with lots of things at the front of the mix that shouldn’t be and Longstreth’s pitch-shifted voice running near-constantly throughout.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Most of the time, Nabuma Rubberband sounds well put-together but empty, all style and no content, the kind of album that won’t offend you while you’re listening to it but which you’d be hard-pressed to remember any of once closer “Let Go” comes to an end.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    IV
    IV feels subdued and professional, something you would never expect to associate with the quartet.