ReelViews' Scores

  • Movies
For 2,743 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Life of Brian (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Feast
Score distribution:
2,743 movie reviews
  1. There's only so far a movie can go on loud music, nicely-framed shots, testosterone, and adrenaline. Bad Boys takes the often-traveled road, and leads the audience to a dead end.
  2. Takes things too far by leaving about 75% of its questions unanswered. This isn't an artistic choice; it's screenwriting sloppiness, and it results in a profoundly dissatisfying experience.
  3. If you're desperate to give something up for Lent, make it movies like this one.
  4. Other than a high cuteness factor, there's not much here. This is a warmed-over, low-end recycling of director Rob Reiner's own "When Harry Met Sally."
  5. Were it not for the high profile names of "Hanks" and "Kasdan", this would be a perfect candidate for a direct-to-video release.
  6. You know you're in trouble when 50% of the running length is devoted to plot exposition, and the movie still doesn't make any sense.
  7. It is possible to make an engaging action/adventure picture of this sort, but The Scorpion King isn't it. The movie isn't godawful, but it's far from inspired, and, as I sat through its 90 minute running length, I found my mind wandering.
  8. Deliver us from directors who think that asking cast members to overact is the only way he can cover us the numerous ludicrous weaknesses of his screenplay.
  9. This lame animated fable, despite having "direct-to-video" written all over it, was released by Disney, in an act of unparalleled greed and desperation, into multiplexes.
  10. Comes across as a cheesy, fundamentally unsatisfying experience.
  11. What Linklater does exceptionally well is open the door on an era seventeen years in the past. This is 1976, from the music and cars...to the people and their attitudes. You'd have to climb into a time machine to get a better view...However, this is light entertainment -- nothing groundbreaking or even especially noteworthy.
  12. I lost track of how many times I checked my watch during the nearly three interminable hours it took Heat to play itself to a predictable conclusion of a chase scene and a shoot-out.
  13. Offers slim pickings for viewers, regardless of whether they're fans of Woody Allen or not. And I'm sure the French will love it.
  14. There's nothing remotely memorable about this walk.
  15. Although Ford does not exactly mail in his performance, this is a lazy job, and far from his best work. On top of that, he has no chemistry with co-star (and heartthrob of the moment) Josh Hartnett.
  16. Turns out to be hopelessly mediocre -- a poorly scripted, preachy fable that forgets about unfolding a coherent, believable story in its zeal to spread propaganda.
  17. Quickly causes viewers to lose patience, then interest.
  18. Likely won't please fans of the original TV series, but the movie hasn't been made for them.
  19. This is schlock -– by-the-numbers action that ignores character development to the point where we find it hard to care whether L.T. catches Hallam.
  20. A somewhat lackluster cop buddy movie that goes wrong in two big ways: (1) it fails to utilize Chan's full range of skills, relegating him to the role of a kickboxing action hero and virtually ignoring his comedic aptitude, and (2) it saddles him with a partner, played by the irritating Chris Tucker.
  21. The film is too light and juvenile to be viewed as some sort of darkly subversive satire in which the director is laughing at those of us who take it all semi-seriously.
  22. Formulated on an idiotic idea and develops a predictably lackluster motion picture from it.
  23. The plot is straightforward and predictable to the point of painfulness.
  24. About as frightening as Walt Disney's Haunted Mansion.
  25. Murphy in particular deserves better, but at least she got a boyfriend and a paycheck out of the deal. No such benefits await those who sacrifice both cash and time to see this movie.
  26. A stillborn affair that could have been -- and should have been -- a whole lot hipper and funnier. If you've seen the two- minute theatrical trailer, you've seen nearly everything that's worthwhile in the feature.
  27. If ever there was a movie that could cause even the most restless sleeper to fall into a deep slumber, this is it.
  28. It worked once, but the novelty factor is gone. The cheese is still there, but this time it's overlaid with a cynical sense that the only reason the movie exists is because the first one made so much money.
  29. Red Dragon is done in a painfully mechanical, by-the-book manner. Scenes are assembled to move the plot from point A to point B. There's no atmosphere. No tension. Flat performances. All of these problems are rightfully laid at the feet of the man in charge.
  30. A horror film that starts out creepy but ends up disjointed and borderline- incoherent. It's a shame that the final product isn't a little better packaged because, unlike many lame entries into the genre, this one actually contains a few interesting, philosophically titillating ideas.
  31. The moment Showtime begins to take itself even remotely seriously, it loses whatever edge it might have had -- and that occurs less than 15 minutes into the proceedings. The best time for Showtime is no time.
  32. Moody and atmospheric -- a study in tone over plot and pacing over characterization. Unfortunately, in devoting all of their efforts towards the film's look and feel, co-creators Mark and Michael Polish have crafted a motion picture that is static, occasionally opaque, and, worst of all, boring.
  33. Some of the dialogue is astonishingly awful. Sex and relationships are constantly likened to animal interaction.
  34. This movie desperately wants to be liked. The problem is, there's not much here to like -- at least nothing that's new or interesting.
  35. The real problem with Desperado, however, is that this sequel is without purpose and may be the most unnecessary follow-up since the second "Crocodile Dundee."
  36. There's not a slowly-paced scene or a dull moment to be found. If nothing else, this film won't bore the average viewer. However, when Hackers has been dissected, what's uncovered beneath the flashy skin is an old-fashioned, film-by-numbers thriller.
  37. Disappointing, but barely watchable.
  38. Feel-good tripe: a string of clich├ęs lashed together by a formulaic plot that features underwritten characters and sit-com style humor.
  39. If your reason for seeing In the Cut is to watch America's sweetheart stripped bare, you'll get what you're looking for. On the other hand, if you're looking for a good movie, this one will disappoint.
  40. The film's heart is undoubtedly in the right place, but so what? Fine ideals don't mean much when they're couched in an inert, pointless storyline.
  41. It's moderately engaging for the first half-hour, somewhat trying during the second half hour, and virtually unbearable over the final twenty minutes. It's a marginally recommendable film for kids, but not necessarily for parents.
  42. A plot that insults, betrays, and cheats every member of the audience. Stupidity to a degree can sometimes be forgiven. Stupidity to this degree can not and should not.
  43. It's dull, childish, and uninspired.
  44. Perhaps the most disappointing thing about Apt Pupil is the lack of sustained tension generated by director Bryan Singer.
  45. The most likely facial expression to be elicited by Mona Lisa Smile is a grimace.
  46. This is a dull, lifeless production that will find favor only with those with an insider's perspective or who feel compelled to praise the acclaimed director's every film, no matter how out-of-touch and pretentious it may be.
  47. The film occasionally pokes fun at itself, although not nearly as often as it should. I don't recommend it for anything more significant than a bottom-of-the-barrel rental or a desperation cable choice, but it delivers what it advertises, and I suppose that could be considered a virtue.
  48. The film's comedy is lackluster, with supporting actors Nathan Lane and Sean Hayes (as Tad's manager and agent) providing a few mildly amusing moments that would be at home in a sit-com.
  49. When I watch a comedy, I want it either to present endearing characters in fun situations or to make me laugh frequently. BASEketball accomplishes neither objective.
  50. It's only possible to have the time of your life once, and, for this franchise, that was in 1987.
  51. There is a reason why books are books and movies are movies, and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas makes a pretty good case that the two don't always mix.
  52. Although the film is clearly trying to follow in the footsteps of the Beatles' classic, it's several long strides behind, lacking the same sense of originality, spontaneity, high energy, and joi de vivre.
  53. The biggest flaw can be summed up in a short phrase: lack of excitement. Thrillers are supposed to be crammed with thrills (hence the name), but Anaconda is relatively barren of them.
  54. With each death, the film becomes less interesting. By the end, it's just a routine slasher flick with a too-predictable final "twist."
  55. Director Todd Haynes' (Safe) much-anticipated look at the "glam rock" scene of two decades ago, is like a jigsaw puzzle with half of the pieces missing.
  56. A lackluster melodrama with only a few inspired moments.
  57. It has an interesting subtext. I'm referring to the way the lives and friendships of these four individuals crumble in the wake of their accident.
  58. A fast-food type of movie - it looks good in the commercials and is easy to sit through, but it doesn't offer much in the way of satisfaction.
  59. The good news first: The Alamo is probably the most historically accurate depiction yet to reach the screen of the famous siege. The bad news is that "historically accurate" does not necessarily translate into "dramatically successful."
  60. Laws of Attraction is a standard-issue romantic comedy that's missing a key ingredient: the attraction.
  61. As unlikely as it may sound, 2004 is the year when directors Kevin Smith and Garry Marshall have made virtually the same movie...Nevertheless, it's impossible to deny that Raising Helen is a near clone of "Jersey Girl."
  62. An insipid, stillborn drama that drags its viewers through a ghetto of despair before finally, unexpectedly plopping them down in the midst of a happy ending.
  63. One of Mindhunters' strengths is that it's difficult to guess who the culprit is because Harlin and his screenwriters don't play fair with the audience.
  64. With its hackneyed plot, feeble attempts at characterization, and predictable finale, the second half of Independence Day becomes an extremely dull and lifeless affair.
  65. The kind of film that will work for an audience that's just interested in having an emotional experience (with a happy ending) without caring how obviously or clumsily they are manipulated. I find this sort of sledgehammer film making to be offensive, but there are those who enjoy it.
  66. Although each episode might be marginally entertaining in its own right, the overall effect is that the movie isn't funny enough, exciting enough, or dramatic enough to warrant two hours of an audience member's time.
  67. The film is preposterous to the point of distraction, where the necessary level of suspension of disbelief exceeds the capacity of a normal, thinking person.
  68. All that's missing from Ivan Reitman's Six Days, Seven Nights is a plot with a moment's originality.
  69. It's an excursion into a melodramatic morass that occasionally becomes difficult to sit through because it's so cloying.
  70. The result is a poorly-focused motion picture characterized by limp satire and capped off by a final fifteen minutes that could send half of the audience into sugar shock.
  71. There's not a moment of originality in the entire motion picture.
  72. The content is actually pretty bland -- it's not incisive, it's not daring, it's not uproarious, and it's not very good.
  73. Ron Livingstone plays his part relatively straight, and, as a result, comes out unscathed.
  74. Probably best skipped - unless you have a penchant for shallow, "comfortable" foreign films that offer obvious messages and never attempt to challenge the viewer.
  75. The limp movie seems to be an attempt by an Australian to mimic a bad American romantic comedy, and, unfortunately, he succeeds admirably.
  76. This movie is a perfect example of what's wrong with many big-budget films today: no characters, no intelligence, and, worst of all, little fun.
  77. MouseHunt is "'Home Alone" with a rodent in the place of Macaulay Culkin.
  78. This film, which places yet another actor in the batsuit, has all the necessary hallmarks of a sorry sequel -- pointless, plodding plotting; asinine action; clueless, comatose characterization; and dumb dialogue.
  79. This could easily go down as the year's best example of solid acting in a wretched motion picture.
  80. In the end, Conspiracy Theory fails to work as an action film, a romance, or a mystery -- all of which it aspires to be.
  81. Isn't much better or worse than the average James Bond movie, except, of course, that it doesn't have the cars, the gadgets, the girls, or Bond himself.
  82. If you take The Postman at face value - that it's a straightforward, post- apocalyptic adventure tale, then it could seem like one of the worst movies of the year, if not of all time.
  83. Pretty much a one-trick pony, and, after a while, that trick loses its ability to impress.
  84. Ray
    Sluggish, conventional, and almost completely lacking in energy.
  85. Die-hard fans are advised to wait for the video. Everyone else would be better off pretending that this movie doesn't exist. In the long run, you'll have a higher opinion of everyone involved.
  86. By de-mythologizing Alexander, Stone has turned him into an unbelievable individual. We accept great deeds from great people, not from sniveling whiners.
  87. Not an abomination, although it is uninspired and insipid. As such, it's perfect television fare.
  88. Saved by energetic musical numbers.
  89. The problem lies in the screenplay which latches on to the few clever and/or funny elements in the film and runs them into the ground via repetition.
  90. Ultimately, however, appreciation of The Phantom of the Opera will hinge upon your opinion of Lloyd Webber's skills as a composer.
  91. A major misstep and a disappointment of significant proportions. It may not be a failure for Eastwood the actor, but it's a big one for Eastwood the director.
  92. I have never been a fan of the original Carrie, but, despite the different slant offered by The Rage, there's not enough new material here for me to like the sequel any better.
  93. The premise is inherently interesting, but the screenplay (by Glen & Les Charles) is unwilling to take chances. Instead, it uses stock events to push events forward.
  94. Besson may have misfired with The Fifth Element, but at least he does it with flair and a sense of humor.
  95. The main problem with Coach Carter can be summed up simply: too much sermonizing.
  96. One of the least effective comic book-to-movie stories to have come along in the past few years. Without a viable screenplay, there's nowhere for the character to go, and no way to avoid making her look silly.
  97. This is a charmless, lifeless affair that had me leaving the theater in a mood more appropriate to a funeral than a wedding.
  98. Several strokes short of a respectable finish.
  99. Mechanical and artificial, and tells you what to think.
  100. Despite its name, Beautiful Girls is actually about a group of irritating, twenty-something males whose adolescent attitudes have remained with them well into adulthood.

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