Rolling Stone's Scores

For 2,664 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Short Cuts
Lowest review score: 0 Annie
Score distribution:
2664 movie reviews
  1. Cate Blanchett can do anything, even play Bob Dylan, but she can't save this creaky sequel to her star-making 1998 biopic of Elizabeth I.
  2. If you fell for the 2013 original — and surprisingly, many did — then Now You See Me 2 has got your number. For the rest of us, however, this longer, louder sequel adds up to what one character calls "a sack of nada."
  3. Doesn't seem directed at all; you half expect the actors to crash into each other. Still, give me the attempted satire of Head of State over the racial stereotyping of "Bringing Down the House" anyday. You can feel a mind at work when you watch Rock.
  4. It's the strafing satire that's MIA.
  5. De Niro's decision to make Dwight a loony from the get-go throws the delicate symmetry of the story out of whack.
  6. The film ultimately gives in to a case of TV-movie blahs.
  7. It's subpar sitcom.
  8. Kline finds every nuance of mirth and melancholy in this wonder of a role and rides it to glory. You can't take your eyes off him.
  9. Just soak up that Tuscan sun and wonder when Lane will get another movie, like "Unfaithful" or "A Walk on the Moon," that will let her really shine.
  10. The film feels more like a thesis than vivid drama.
  11. Sherrybaby is the kind of pretend-arty Sundance thing that gives indie cinema a bad name.
  12. Wahlberg could sleepwalk through this role, and does. See this movie and you'll surely follow his lead.
  13. There's heart but not much heat in this film version of "The Echoing Grove."
  14. If you're thinking "yuck," you're right. I added the extra star for Zooey Deschanel, who is so delicious as his honey that you want not to say no to Yes Man.
  15. Lots of talented young singers decorate the scenery, notably Jeremy Jordan (late of Broadway's failed Bonnie & Clyde but soon-to-open in Newsies)who has vocal and acting chops that shine even in this bucket of Glee Goes Gospel cornpone.
  16. Jennifer Aniston is a friend in need of a movie script that will really let her talent blossom. Picture Perfect is too TV-ish and timid a romantic farce to do the trick.
  17. Even the best actors -- and I'd rank Joaquin Phoenix and Mark Ruffalo among their generation's finest -- can't save a movie that aims for tragedy but stalls at soap opera.
  18. Jewison dodges the issues in the script by Ronald Harwood (The Pianist) to focus on cat-and-mouse chases that kill interest.
  19. In an effort to blend Thackeray and "Sex and the City," Vanity Fair ends up nowhere.
  20. Colorful and exciting, as far as it goes. But Boyle and Hodge pull back on their usual wit and grit.
    • Rolling Stone
  21. It strikes me that their teasing and one-upmanship are more brother and sister at play than lovers in heat. Cruise and Diaz are in it for the action rush.
  22. Must all films about alienation be themselves alienating? Take a walk on the beach and ponder that one. There's a line between artful and arty, and Malick has crossed it.
  23. As sexist propaganda, the film is shameless.
  24. Writer-director Mike Binder, who worked beautifully with Costner on 2005's "The Upside of Anger," finds himself on the downside of juggling stereotypes.
  25. This slapstick road movie feels tossed off by people on a raunchy bender. I mean that as a good thing. The trouble with Hit & Run is that it can't sustain its trippy effervescence.
  26. An alternately kick-ass and clumsy piece of sci-fi claptrap that puts its empty head down and gets the job done.
  27. In relying on narration, Redford's movie is too little show and too much tell.
  28. At the risk of understatement, The Matrix Revolutions sucks.
  29. The main problem with this treatise on racial politics undercover as an exercise in suspense is that the director, Neil LaBute, didn't write the script.
  30. Life mirroring nature in all its wayward ferocity. Too much? You bet. But Fassbender (Magneto in X-Men) and Vikander (an Oscar winner for The Danish Girl), who fell in love during the making of the film, fully commit to their roles and hold us in their grip. The movie, sad to say, can't keep its head above water.

Top Trailers