San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 945 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Generation Kill: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Fear Factor: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 497
  2. Negative: 0 out of 497
497 tv reviews
  1. The Pacific is a superb, viscerally moving and harrowing depiction of World War II and a worthy complement to "Band of Brothers" (2001).
  2. Lost has a stellar, varied cast, it is shot beautifully and it surprises more often than it makes you wince or wheeze, which, in the math of action-adventure-sci-fi-thrillers, is a good thing. [22 Sept 2004, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  3. There isn't a better cop show on TV right now than Southland.
  4. Top of the Lake is Jane Campion and her cast at the top of their game.
  5. Great historical documentaries not only enlighten us about the past, but tell us things about our own times as well, either directly or implicitly. Prohibition, the latest project by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, states the implicit links between the passage of the 18th Amendment and contemporary politics so loudly, you'd have to be drunk on bathtub gin not to get the message.
  6. It's a gloriously visual fairy tale full of saturated colors and whimsical stories, the kind of romantic comedy/whodunit that should, by rights, captivate a nation starved for quirkiness and delight.
  7. The portrait of Belafonte that emerges from the film is also the portrait of the times of his life, the times of the nation's life in the past 60 years.
  8. The sweep of Rescue Me is far-reaching, and it's fearless in trying to break new ground in an old genre.
  9. The reason the show feels so real at every turn is that it is a perfect balance of dramatic realism and gentle humor.
  10. As Sutter proved in the intriguing and original first season, there's plenty more riveting storytelling to tap into as Sons of Anarchy boldly comes of age.
  11. It's a strong cast, and Byrne and Wiest continue to deliver incredibly mannered and minutely shaded performances.
  12. This series has always handled the duality of his character with masterful strokes. And it has done viewers a favor by quickly setting up the seasonlong scenario.
  13. At times, there are actual punch lines in the script and the show veers into "writerly" territory.... But make no mistake: You should overlook the shortcomings and enjoy the series on its own otherwise considerable merits, chief among them, of course, Billy Bob Thornton.
  14. The PBS film gives us greater perspective and insight, probing the conflicted attitudes toward civil rights in the Kennedy administration, and detailing the last-minute panic over Lewis' speech.
  15. The performances, nurtured by such A-list directors as Michael Apted and John Madden, are extraordinary. There isn't a clinker in the bunch.
  16. What Judd Apatow failed to accomplish in "Freaks and Geeks," his critically praised but short-lived NBC series about high school, he more than makes up for in Undeclared, a dead-on look at college life that manages to be both hilarious and sweet.
  17. There have been many great "Masterpiece" offerings over the decades, but I can't think of a single one that is as much out-and-out fun as Sherlock, a modern-dress Conan Doyle that crackles with superb writing, brilliant performances and snappy direction, and does it all while somehow managing to be oddly faithful to the original source material.
  18. What remains compelling about The Shield as it heads into its last hurrah are the gray areas and ethical gradations of the characters that have defined it.
  19. This series is one of a kind.
  20. Rescue Me may ask a lot of its viewers, but it's always a leap worth taking, and well rewarded. [13 June 2007, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  21. In the case of Sunny, it comes out of the gate as brilliantly twisted as ever.
  22. It is emotionally raw, harrowing, and a thing of such singular horrific beauty, it will move you, exhaust you and, almost paradoxically, thrill you at the heights television drama can attain.
  23. As much as the script, Reiner’s direction makes both stories seem oxymoronically unique and distinct at the same time. The performances are extraordinary, as they must be to complete the process of retelling a seemingly similar story.
  24. There are many small and wonderful dramatic accomplishments in the underappreciated gem that is Battlestar Galactica, but perhaps the most enduring is that what was conceived of as an epic space adventure has turned into a finely detailed, intimate drama.
  25. Lapine's direction is almost the star of Six by Sondheim. Not only has he used the six songs to illuminate the composer's life, he organizes years and years of interviews as if they are an ongoing conversation--which, in many ways, they are. They are the monograph of the life and art of a singular man, perfectly assembled, bit by bit, piece by piece.
  26. The first three episodes of Season 2 that AMC sent out continue that level of achievement with no evident missteps.
  27. The writing, by Weiner, direction by Scott Hornbacher and performances are, of course, top notch.
  28. The animation, overseen by art director James McDermott, is fresh, colorful and as wacky as the script.
  29. They [Rayna and Juliette], and the other characters, are anything but [one-dimensional cliches], thanks not only to the writing but also to the performances of the colorful and capable cast.
  30. The emotional authenticity of Downton Abbey continues to make it a classic.

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