San Francisco Chronicle's Scores

For 1,108 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Weeds: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Z Nation: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 596
  2. Negative: 0 out of 596
596 tv reviews
  1. This is a series that was completely unexpected, and Hall has hard-and-fast rules about what Joan and God can do. She's not making up the story arcs on the fly, which gives confidence that this unusual creation is in good hands. [25 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • San Francisco Chronicle
  2. Togetherness is easy to like on one level and probably a little more challenging as the Duplass brothers explore the quiet discontent among people who are just trying to do they best they can. It’s worth the effort. The emotional payoff is enormous.
  3. Take away the song and dance, you’re left with an engaging series about a young woman who’s too smart to be as obsessed as she is supposed to be.
  4. Though future episodes don't quite measure up to the brilliant pilot, Archer nurtures a collection of recurring themes that pile up and become funnier the more they are referenced through the episodes.
  5. When you have a story as thoroughly involving as this one, evoking both "King Lear" and "Citizen Kane," and when the performances are this good, Boss almost directs itself.
  6. Project Runway is entertaining and likable on so many levels that it's hard to resist.
  7. "Weeds" is colossally great... a series far better than its premise and utterly essential for devotees of smart, entertaining television.
  8. Manhattan brings legitimate class to WGN's nascent original content project.
  9. The series commands our attention because of how it was conceived by Neil Cross, who continues to write masterful scripts.
  10. By the third episode of the three sent to critics, the bits and pieces of apparent flotsam from the earlier episodes have begun to form a direction for Better Call Saul and as they do, the series becomes less a comedy and more a serious exploration of a Falstaffian character who may be much more than the buffoon he seems on the surface.
  11. What's remarkable about this quartet, and why Push Girls proves that reality shows can actually be intelligent and engaging, is that in most ways the women's lives are in fact not all that remarkable.
  12. Several recent documentaries have tried to help the rest of the world understand the realities of being transgender, but, ironically, one of the better efforts does it well in spite of the fact that it focuses on the offspring of one of the most famous couples in pop culture.
  13. The films work individually, of course, but gain even greater meaning and emotional strength in context with each other.
  14. When Season 3 kicks off spectacularly, there's a slight exhale in the first 59 minutes--then a twist. And not a small one, either. By the second episode, the writers give you roughly 40 minutes to digest that twist, then drop a real stunner. Which is--just to cut to the chase here--truly and incredibly exciting television.
  15. But this is an epic drama on HBO, correct? So is it Giamatti or Adams himself who will make viewers wish for a swifter and less pedantic version on the History Channel?
  16. There's some spot-on and sharp humor throughout, but it never gets too light and breezy.
  17. Making a film is kind of a nightmare, but a riveting one. And Project Greenlight is in itself a riveting documentary. It's got a hero, it's got stars, it's got drama. In 12 parts, we'll find out if there's a happy ending.
  18. Writer Stephen Butchard has done a superb job distilling the nuance and complexity of Cornwell’s story, which avoids simplistic good guys vs. bad guys plotting.
  19. It probably works better onstage, but Stevens should know that what you do to achieve suspension of disbelief in a theater is not what you do to convince an audience that what it is seeing in a film is real.
  20. Television simply doesn't get warmer or fuzzier than Last Tango in Halifax, but the reason the six-part series works so well is that its sweetness is not unalloyed.
  21. Lost is a different genre, one that may infuriate even the loyalists, but there's something impressive and rewarding in its density.
  22. "Friday Night Lights" is not good. It's great.
  23. The strength of his film is that he leaves it to us to make our own decisions about Barnes and the other death row inmates.
  24. Glee, one of the season's best and most anticipated new series, delivers on both counts - and more. It's a quirky, sweet, humorous, nonpartisan funfest.
  25. The Americans benefits from convincing performances by the cast, but Weisberg's concept and writing in the first two episodes make the show much more than "just" a spy thriller.
  26. The humor is one reason the show works, and the cast, especially Kemper, is the other.
  27. The performances are very good at every level, in part because the script is good enough to bring out the best in this cast.
  28. If the film had been directed by anyone else, it would be only an exhaustively detailed profile of a man of Shakespearean achievements, disappointments and ambitions. But The Diplomat was directed by the subject’s son, David Holbrooke, who gives the film dimension that no other filmmaker could have achieved.
  29. The fall's funniest sitcom.
  30. People who watched the Maysleses' documentary when it came out probably found the women strange, to say the least, but may have also felt sympathy for them in the end. That's the feeling that director and co-screenwriter Michael Sucsy is going for in the HBO film, and he achieves it in spades.

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