Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,948 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Queen of Earth
Lowest review score: 0 Last Will and Embezzlement
Score distribution:
3948 movie reviews
  1. The next step in Jafar Panahi's personal cinema of captivity, a fully fictionalized, wildly bewildering work which imagines a man at war with his own creative impulse.
  2. A barbed inquiry into this particular notion of "self-defense," enabled by the quotidian racism state and perpetuated de jure by the state.
  3. A documentary whatsit acutely aware of the inherent performance people put into social discourse to maintain appearances.
  4. Richard Linklater's film luxuriates in a world that's the platonic ideal of youthful indulgence.
  5. The distinctiveness of Matías Piñeiro's alluring brand of formalism lies in this deference to chance and alchemy.
  6. "You should always be happy." That's a succinct encapsulation of the proudly optimistic spirit animating this joyous film, a worldview which the rest of Girl Walk // All Day illustrates with a combination of thrilling street ballet, exultant music, and unflagging verve.
  7. The Last Detail is so perfectly tailored to the star that it could’ve been mapped out from a Pythagorean theorem.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    To Wong, love isn't something you can talk about; words are inadequate, empty, inevitably reductive. Love is something you see, sense, feel, and Chungking Express is one of Wong's purest evocations of its excitement and heartbreak.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It can't be overstated just how Nothing But a Man is militantly tone-deaf to the Hollywood muzak of race relations.
  8. Johanna Hamilton's 1971 represents a mind-blowing scoop disguised as a fairly garden-variety issue doc.
  9. The landscape seems to push the characters away at the same time that it anchors them into place, suggesting that elsewhere is a promise that only dreams can keep.
  10. A Quiet Passion's accomplishment is in fleshing out the stark context behind Emily Dickinson's ethereal words.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Diamond-hard and dazzlingly brilliant, David Cronenberg's film plays like a deeply perverse, darkly comic successor to Videodrome.
  11. The film believes in maturity, but only as a freely continual process of acceptance.
  12. The film sympathetically renders the small humiliations and inconveniences of life as an old-world vampire struggling with modernity.
  13. It's a bit reductive in terms of a personal portrait, but this is a film that's not concerned with telling the story of a man, instead making him a representative symbol of a mostly bygone way of life, a reminder of both the fleeting nature of individual experience and the steady patterns of a broader human existence.
  14. A playfully self-reflective rumination on what writer-director Terence Nance has described as "self-awareness through experience with love."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Brief Encounters is great entertainment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    JFK
    JFK still retains a primal power; no number of derivative, headache-inducing CSI episodes can blunt the impact of Stone's aggressive visuals, and the film's plea for accountability and honesty in government is as vital now as ever.
  15. Alice Winocour's take on this true story carries the superficial trappings of a period drama, but its perspective is entirely contemporary.
  16. Todd Kellstein doesn't allow you to entirely indulge convenient (though understandable and perhaps irresistible) armchair outrage.
  17. Mike Ott and Nathan Silver's film has a ghostly, tremulous quality that eats under the skin.
  18. Like Hitchcock, De Palma reveals himself to be guided by an unusual mixture of intuition and intellectualization.
  19. A lot of evil is laid on the table in El Sicario, and the film makes a big, if exquisitely subtle show, of theorizing that there's no way to explain how it got there.
  20. George Miller orchestrates the rubber-burning pandemonium with the illicit smirk of someone who knows he's giving us exactly what we want.
  21. Each brief glimpse of the creature’s fleshy, slithering mass imbues the character drama with an aching sexual desire and, as the violent potential of the entity becomes clear, a mounting sense of dread.
  22. It may be Piñeiro’s most inspired and thrilling work to date, exhaustive in its means of keeping the viewer off balance and yet rich in its emotional implications.
  23. Broomfield isn't so much dedicated to journalistic truth or social ethnography as he is displaying bodies and mindsets of individuals that complicate any sense of Manichean polemics, where good and evil must be reckoned with at a purely secular and corporeal level, particularly along the lines of class and gender.
  24. In the logic of the film, for the camera to move at all would feel like a betrayal of its contemplative hunger.
  25. Frederick Wiseman's At Berkeley isn't only a study of the contemporary American university, but, like all of the filmmaker's best documentaries, a wide-ranging inquiry into the larger institutions and contradictions that define life in the United States.

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