Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,788 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 House of Pleasures
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Bad Can Happen
Score distribution:
3788 movie reviews
  1. The near-surgical precision with which Yorgos Lanthimos approaches the most surreal of conceits turns out to be a double-edged sword.
  2. Tsai Ming-liang's debut makes one yearn for an alternative reality where it, not Pulp Fiction, became the beacon of '90s independent filmmaking.
  3. Striking throughout are the seemingly caught-on-the-wing moments that subtly enrichen the film’s characterizations.
  4. Like the original cast’s best movie, The Wrath of Khan, this Star Trek essentially turns out to be a war film, with the occasional philosophical timeout to discuss love, friendship, and duty until the next bone-crunching fistfight or multi-weapon rumble with the Romulans. But Bana’s villain lacks the wit and corny majesty of Ricardo Montalban’s.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Noah Baumbach's film feels like too perfect a portrait of quarter-life malady, down to the rushed redemptive endnotes and Greta Gerwig's idealized heroine.
  5. An acutely felt, altogether devastating family drama as intimate and affecting as it is sprawling and untamed.
  6. The endless scenes of burning buildings and macho posturing merely provide an action-driven context for the filmmakers to deal with more personal topics like loneliness and resiliency.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Tobias Lindholm's hostage-negotiation drama that wields its verité style for maximum tension.
  7. Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon's shtick - a relentless verbal sparring comprised of dueling impressions, poetry recitations, absurdist riffing, and comic one-upmanship - works best in small doses.
  8. Given the film's early promise, it's unfortunate how it turns into a largely reductive Freudian character piece in which the main character has to come to terms with his old man.
  9. Every moment in writer-director Grímur Hákonarson's strange and wonderful film is imbued with mystery and revealing dignity.
  10. Throughout, director Penny Lane strings together telling incidents and anecdotes with a light touch.
  11. The film has an artisanal intensity that prevents it from turning into a smug and predictable exercise in political revision.
  12. Joseph Cedar's Footnote is a sour, rather unpleasant affair that hinges on acts of Jews behaving badly.
  13. The screenwriter's signature verbal-diarrhetic dialogue allows for a nonstop blaring of actorly chops that, like the movie at large, is nothing if not committed.
  14. The bloat and heft of Marley's narrative scope leaves the viewer awash in a sea of historical "facts" with very little sense of the human experience behind the curtain of celebrity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    For Carl Dreyer, to film a miracle took a single shot; for Bruno Dumont, a whole film. In Le Havre, Aki Kaurismäki needs four shots to capture his - and what an ordinary event it is!
  15. This arc may sound particularly familiar on paper, but To Be Heard finds the unique passions and heartaches in all three stories, allowing the viewer to become invested in whatever outcome befalls each subject.
  16. Ciro Guerra's excesses in arthouse symmetry tend to arrive in the service of a just and angry correctivism.
  17. It does lightly suggest scintillating questions about the responsibility artists have in reflecting current political moments in their music.
  18. A serviceable primer on the digital-celluloid divide in commercial cinema, if a bit unwieldy in scope and in danger of being made obsolete by the next version of the RED camera.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A marvelously elastic storyteller, a dry wit, and a Rivettean anti-determinist, the Chilean auteur Raúl Ruiz is fascinated by narratives that dilate from within, images seemingly full of secret passageways, and fabulists who collect tales like toys.
  19. It's as if Carlos Saura were calling the bluff of spectacle-oriented narrative cinema that necessitates excusing its excesses with characters and plotting.
  20. The film's 90 minutes are a disorienting cyclone of destructive incidents and propulsive energy.
  21. Ira Sachs's push for heartrending poetry makes it clear that the film is putting too fine a gloss on the acute pains of one small tragedy.
  22. Pablo Larraín has captured Pablo Neruda in all of his pomposity, pretense, courage, and undeniable genius.
  23. Pablo Berger digs for emotional intensity in his gothic retelling of Snow White and only uncovers layers of gloss.
  24. Nuri Bilge Ceylan has to be the least kinetic of working filmmakers - and not simply in the sense of static camerawork or lack of narrative momentum.
  25. Alain Guiraudie's film portrays cruising as a danger-seeking and astoundingly repetitive affair, intimately linked to death itself.
  26. Denis Villeneuve's film views life in the age of the modern-day drug war as an ever-crescendoing existential nightmare.

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