Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,432 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 You're Next
Lowest review score: 0 Here Comes the Boom
Score distribution:
2,432 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Sergei Loznitsa occasionally writes his ideas too explicitly in the film's dialogue, though he makes up for this by deftly employing some ironic symbolism elsewhere.
  1. Sergei Loznitsa's documentaries are mainly compilations of archival footage, so it makes sense that his first fiction film is also essentially a compilation, an array of dynamic, aggressive bits rather than one coherent text.
  2. One of Woody Allen's strongest and most pointed films in over a decade despite mildly falling victim to his recent propensity for clunky narrative development, cynicism, and stereotypical characterizations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The pangs of romance, eroticism, anguish, and longing (both for the stolen moments of private passion and for the sense-making schematics of Empire) transcend any period of cinema Tabu may evoke.
  3. This inventive animated feature about depression and familial roots suggests NPR's "The Moth" storytelling series by way of Persepolis, mixing mesmerizing memoir monologue with whimsical animation.
  4. What emerges is a portrait of a fully committed band that could never quite make it and of the rock n' roll project as something between a (very serious) hobby and a full-time career.
  5. The documentary provides a birdsong of perseverance in the face of irrational violence, immense historic anger, and grim, seemingly insurmountable realities.
  6. Throughout, what truly matters to director Jonathan Glazer is articulating through visual and aural enticement the unconscious power of our death drive.
  7. Christopher Nolan's capper of his Batman trilogy is a summer blockbuster of grand inclinations in both form and content.
  8. With The Devil's Backbone, Del Toro pulls an Amenábar by dishing out sophisticated war commentary with bone-chilling dread.
  9. Worry and sadness are palpable, but so is wry humor and irony as Song ponders age and mortality with a sensitive eye for emotions and a strong sense of composition.
  10. The Guard is John Michael McDonagh's caustically funny riff on cop and crime films.
  11. George Washington this isn't, but there's enough heft here that the comparison can be tastefully made.
  12. Documentarian and subject, past and present blur together like bleeding watercolors in Raymond De Felitta's gripping memoir.
  13. The film is nothing without the physicality of the performers, as Joss Whedon's script handles the transition of Shakespeare's language to modern day indifferently.
  14. The feminist bent of Robyn's quest nicely shadows the film without ever being stated aloud.
  15. Mitra Farahani rescues the doc from becoming a talking-head fest by embracing her creative self as a character and exposing the travails of her own authorship process.
  16. The pleasure in watching the film becomes a linguistic one as Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart masterfully sharpen their words and hurl them at each other like projectiles out of a blowpipe.
  17. The third and final film in Ulrich Seidl's "Paradise" trilogy navigates a narrow space between tenderness and cruelty.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Breillat's scripting of Maud as fatally distant from her family, willfully independent, but more believably abandoned, is haunting.
  18. Director Mahmoud Kaabour is Fatima's grandson, and she instantly seizes on--lightly, in her way--the guilt and panic that's inspired him to make this film.
    • Slant Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    Although we never really get to know He or Miao, despite following them around vérité-style, director Yung Chang expertly captures the rays of Western culture bouncing off them.
  19. Director David Gelb details, among other things, the painstaking process that goes into creating mouthwatering pieces of sushi.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    To Wong, love isn't something you can talk about; words are inadequate, empty, inevitably reductive. Love is something you see, sense, feel, and Chungking Express is one of Wong's purest evocations of its excitement and heartbreak.
  20. Beautiful, poetic, and hard-hitting without the use of excessive force and deeply layered with evolving and regional nuances of feminine experience
  21. For its general ludic obsession with all things generally thought of as disgusting, the German film Wetlands is stuck in the anal stage.
  22. Not only sets up the writer's life as representative of the transitions of early modern Jewish life, but posits his oeuvre as an ongoing chronicle of the shift from a vibrant, unified Yiddish culture to a fractured world-in-exile.
  23. This lovely film is ultimately an articulation of something at once simple and universal: the discontent of traveling through life with sad resignation.
  24. A delicate documentary about a way of life that's slowly disappearing, yet gives way to nothing new.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    A visual pleasure, and refreshingly free of message or structure, but it leaves an aftertaste similar to that of an awkward party spent among intellectuals.

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