Slate's Scores

For 455 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 O.J.: Made in America
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 216
  2. Negative: 0 out of 216
216 tv reviews
  1. The Returned is very good. Let it have your brains.
  2. Partly due to its virtuosic storytelling and partly to its sheer scope, Made in America often feels like several masterpieces unfolding at a single time.
  3. A gorgeous period drama that swiftly establishes its risqué themes.... Masters of Sex is the best new show of the fall season.
  4. The Pfeffermans, the dysfunctional family at the center of Jill Soloway’s Transparent, return for a second season more poisonous and captivating than ever.
  5. To call it Amazon’s first great series, or the only great series of the new fall season--both of which are true--is to damn it with faint praise.
  6. The Good Wife, a delectable, invigorating series of unprecedented depth and cynicism, is the best drama on TV.
  7. This series is its own idiosyncratic, unexpected, and wonderful thing--and one of the best works of art I’ve experienced in any medium so far this year.
  8. Creepy, gorgeous, unsettling, and searching, it has--for lack of a better word--a literary quality, an accretion of meaningful detail. You can push on any aspect of the show--every line, every shot, every bruise--and it bears up.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As viewers, because of the incalculable talents of the actor Gervais, who also helped create the show, we must choose to humor David or to loathe him—and that choice is exciting, somehow, and challenging.
  9. There’s nothing programmatic about Louie, which idiosyncratically, unevenly explores C.K.’s ideas and instincts without trying to advance an argument. It’s not a joke you’ve heard before. It’s a great shaggy dog story.
  10. A particularly sharp fourth season.
  11. Unexpectedly sweet-spirited.
  12. Wwhat it lacks in fun, it makes up for in intelligence, complexity, and boldness.
  13. Almost every woman is a good person who made or was forced to make a bad decision, instead of something more sinister, more evil, or even more banal--as if these too were not human characteristics.... But if this sentimental streak is a little soft-headed, it springs from the series’ huge heart and its expansive humanism.
  14. The show is provocative, sexually and mentally; it’s alluring and sordid, arousing and disturbing, a unique viewing experience.
  15. Like its heroine, Olive Kitteridge, the four-hour miniseries airing this Sunday and Monday on HBO, is quietly indomitable, more admirable than easily loveable, more likely to get under your skin than send a shock through your system.
  16. The third season is looser, funnier, more emotional and also significantly less logical than what has come before.
  17. Murphy directs with straightforwardness and sincerity and none of the camp fireworks of Glee or American Horror Story.
  18. Ultimately, watching the trial play out as a fait accompli gives it the heft and structure of a classical tragedy in which everyone is undone by his or her seeming strengths turned to weaknesses.
  19. It is part showbiz satire, part alt-comedy showcase, part plaintive character sketch, and all ambitious gonzo, a show that feels like nothing else on TV, a cult classic that, in the age of Netflix, may appeal to a horde.
  20. Watching, it is almost impossible not to root for these two Communists as they do any and everything they can to undermine America. In this regard, The Americans works its American audience as effectively as its heroes work their marks: It makes double agents of us all.
  21. With its first episode, The Night Of tears out of the driveway, scary and thrilling, like a muscle car. But just as it’s about to open up and do 100, it slows down, unwilling to become a joyride. Instead of proving Naz’s innocence, future episodes take in the scope of his circumstance. For all that The Night Of shares with Serial and Making a Murderer, it shares as much with The Wire, a series about the omnipotence of dysfunctional power structures.
  22. Using new audio-only interviews with the Stones as invisible tape, [director Brett Morgen] splices 50 years of footage into a 110-minute education, remixing the work of earlier filmmakers with splendid editing and a critical eye.
  23. A return to classic form.
  24. Even if Extras never accedes to The Office's heights of comic sublimity, it's still a rare find on American TV: a series that combines the ascendant genre of cringe comedy with Gervais' rich comic gifts, and his trademark humanism.
  25. In the context of other television, American Horror Story is perverse and refreshing, proof that a great show doesn’t have to be self-serious to be smart.
  26. The most engrossing new drama of the fall season.
  27. It smoothly toggles between working as a crime melodrama and a coming-of-age tale, as a harrowing piece of social commentary and a gentle bit of farce.
  28. At the outset, this show aimed for hilarity and hit the mark, consistently and cathartically, while also trafficking in provocative sidewalk philosophy, achieving moral seriousness amid masturbation jokes.
  29. Catastrophe, You’re the Worst, and The Mindy Project have proved that long-term relationships can be funny, sexy, enduring, and volatile all once. Master of None joins their ranks: the sweetest, realest, and most poignant of the bunch.

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