Sonicnet's Scores

  • Music
For 287 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Bow Down To The Exit Sign
Lowest review score: 30 Unified Theory
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 287
287 music reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This collection is a sugar-high set, adrenalized even more than Blink's souped-up studio albums by the waves of Cheap Trick Live at Budokan-like female screams pouring from the audience. And the playing offers plenty of evidence to quiet anyone who thinks these guys are just three-chord wonders.... But young audiences love Blink shows in part for the wiseacre, self-deprecating quips, and this album is full 'em -- and not just between songs, as there are (count 'em) 29 extra tracks of banter lasting over 10 minutes at the album's end.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A fresh, if unfocused, work saturated with zany personality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Call this music "experimental easy-listening" -- neither strident enough to warrant serious commercial attention, nor sufficiently free-form to attract all the independent obsessives.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album shows a band eager to expand its creative range. One wonders, sadly, what might have come next.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Looks and charm can only do so much, and without a distinctive sound or banging tracks, Tyrese tends to get lost in the shuffle...
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    My World, My Way, despite its flaws, may be the New Orleans label's most heroic effort yet, as Silkk parlays a strong message -- about hardcore rap, and real life, and the relationship between the two.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like a cross between Fatboy's cheekiness and the Chems' psychedelia, Super Sound is certainly slick, but it also confirms suspicions that big beat has hit a creative dead end.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On their fourth album, Bedlam Ballroom, the Zippers have concocted another stew of lively dance music. Problem is, with so many people having jumped on the swing revival bandwagon, the group's new material sounds dated. And not in a good way, either -- it merely recalls a fad, rather than evoking the bevy of twentieth-century American music styles the Zippers have long been in love with.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On Bridge, they're still traveling down the long and winding improvisational road, with most of the tracks averaging around five minutes in length (as is true with most of their studio albums). This time out, though, the songs feel like they're twice that.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If you fish around a bit, you'll find several good ideas here, some of which may have worked better in different hands.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the heavy-handed folk-pop production... doesn't serve Williams well here.... In general, the overwrought keyboards and Steve Holley's percussion... could use a good slapdown.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On this excursion into the noodle-prone mind of Mr. Lee. True, all the lyrics are his and his alone, but after all this time, plenty of Peart has rubbed off on him, resulting in much impenetrable mumbo jumbo about the universe and its "secrets" ("The Angels Share") and the workings of the mind...
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the obtrusive vocals mess up the vibe like an unwelcome party crasher. Underworld's experiments with electronica, vocals and rock are dismal failures.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Wildly uneven -
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Why is Quality Control -- an album no doubt many will love simply because of its hip- hop politics -- so damn bland? For all their good intentions, J5's results are so monochromatic, of such a singular focus on staying true to a specific kind of hip-hop blueprint, that even the inclusion of grinning left-field randomness... lacks the fun it means to inject.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It sounds like she couldn't care less if anyone's listening.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A mostly disappointing misfire that seems too eager for commercial pop success.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    She lets [the songs] drift off into the kind of embalmed chamber music respectability often synonymous with the Nonesuch label.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Back-to-church-basement harmonies and familiar pledges of eternal devotion.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's hard to imagine The Golden D as having much of an impact.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Twisted Tenderness hits its turning point on the title track (RealAudio excerpt), a solitary, surefire progressive-house hit that recalls the Pet Shop Boys' 1999 album, Nightlife. From that point the album's energy improves considerably -- so there's the twist: It's not new, but it's improved.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the four-on-the-floor rhythm and riffing quickly become repetitive, blunting Get Ready's impact.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Kid A represents the first time in Radiohead's short history where their desire to do something different has outrun their ability to give their experiments a personal imprint. The problem with the album isn't that it's introspective, or obscure, or even that it's derivative (alternately conjuring Eno, Aphex Twin, Pink Floyd and so forth), but rather that the striking group personality so well defined on the last two collections has seemed to evaporate.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The problem isn't so much that this album sounds dated (not surprising, as it was recorded back when Lil Bow Wow was in pre-K), but rather that the songs are so poorly mixed and produced...
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The dearth of memorable melodies ruins the once-successful formula.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, this newest attempt at expanding the group's musical horizons is more a lateral move than a vertical one, and the same problems that have plagued Better Than Ezra since Deluxe -- mawkish, derivative material -- undermine this effort as well.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, they've simply traded one constrictive, predictable format for another.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Devils Night is nothing special, and it's only saved from the slush pile by Eminem's inventive, cutting-edge raps and Dr. Dre's so-funky-it's-evil production.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, A Day Without Rain, Enya's first new studio album in five years, lacks the edge that could pry it loose from the New Age niche. The Irish traditional music Enya performed so skillfully in the early 1980s with Clannad has by now largely disappeared in a mélange of sly, Celtic-flavored pop hooks and muddled mysticism. The only mystery is why it took her so long to come up with something so short (under 35 minutes) -- and, in many spots, so uninspired.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The problem is, as the album drags on, young Master Mathers wastes his considerable wit and opts to grouse in the guise of a rampaging reactionary. Song after song finds Eminem viciously baiting real and imagined enemies, as if that's all he knows how to do.