Splendid's Scores

  • Music
For 793 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Leaves Turn Inside You
Lowest review score: 10 Fire
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 20 out of 793
793 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not be the best album of their career, but it's certainly the most interesting -- and a reliable cure for your indifference.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those of you who choose to get in on the ground floor of this superlative venture they call Music to Make Love to Your Old Lady By will not be disappointed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's filthy, low-budget fun that's still plenty fucked up, whether you're a first-timer or a hardcore Peaches fanatic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although not every track here is of the highest quality, all sixteen tracks are woven together expertly.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While they don't quite have the cross-gender appeal of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, the pouty disagreeability of the Strokes or the urbane refinement of the Walkmen, they heedlessly summon the spirits of post-punk monoliths like PiL, A Certain Ratio and the Pop Group without forsaking their gritty New Yawk-ian roots.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Compelling listening.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Expansively orchestrated, Nixon ultimately comes off as beautiful but slightly disturbing...
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Point may be less viscerally invasive than any of its recorded counterparts, it remains a beautifully orchestrated exercise in modern pop construction.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wherever I Am, I Am What's Missing remains grounded in electronic composition, but the subtle distinctions between spacy trip-hop epics (see "Diamonds and Stones) and booty-shaking dance-floor numbers help to keep the band's dynamic fresh, even after ten years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Aficionados of WGC's autumnal, melancholy sound will find this fifth full-length release comparable to the group's previous four, only more refined and maybe a little more assured.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The more time you spend with Summer Sun, the more fun it turns out to be.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His most diverse collection of songs to date.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A vibrant, engrossing album by a seasoned band whose best years are still ahead of them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What's most fascinating about Welcome to the Monkey House is that, in the midst of copious drug usage, heavy drinking and god knows what else, the Dandy Warhols have emerged with an album so cleverly coherent that it simply couldn't have come from anywhere else.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another eclectic, bold and idiosyncratic concoction of modern jazz.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I hope that These are the Vistas doesn't go down in history as "that record where the jazz guys played Nirvana", because it is much more than that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An intelligent brew of bare-bones Casio drumbeats, static-driven guitar lines and widescreen arrangements.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rich, varied and emotionally resonant album that eschews AOR sugar fixes for smart, graceful songwriting and soulful but unshowy performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bazooka Tooth not only gets better as the disc goes on -- the beats get thicker, the songs come together more fully and Rock stops proselytizing long enough to let your head bob and relax -- but it actually improves with repeated listens.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another staggering batch of Nashville by-way-of New York twanging folk-punk ditties that will all but solidify his reputation as the Gram Parsons of the no-depression set.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album sounds full whether you're in the next room or sitting right beside the speakers. Details -- a horn here, a steel guitar there, a lilting piano figure that appears out of the ether -- fill every cranny in a sound that's still as spacious as Giant Sand's Southwestern soundtracks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though it's fair to question their sense of tradition, they succeed where other blues-aping artists, like Gomez and Arnold, have failed, because they're not wholly indebted to the customs of the blues. They've merely co-opted its grisly spirit and transformed it into something unique.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On The Facts of Life, [Luke] Haines and musical co-conspirator cum multi-instrumentalist John Moore construct a vast sonic wonderland in which [Sarah] Nixey’s starry-eyed vocals are given free reign.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band should be proud of Yanqui U.X.O. -- it proves that they're not hopelessly married to the fine-print details of their formula, and that they can still wring fresh ideas from familiar territory.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Politics of the Business follows in the conceptual footsteps of its forbears, its all-too-literal sense of moral responsibility does get a tad tiresome, occasionally sagging into diluted dogma.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Power Out's most impressive feature is the musicianship and songwriting skill on display.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is, like all the best pop music, silly, pointless and thoroughly lacking in high-level intellectual discourse. Thank heaven.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All the best songs here seem to launch from the point at which Technique left off; they have the same bounce, the same speed and many of the same hooks (especially in "Bert's Theme", "Kashmere" and "I've Got a Feeling") as that Hook-dominated New Order record.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold, adventurous, whimsical and witty, this debut offering from Circulatory System proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that there are still signs of life to be found in the Elephant 6 collective.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their fizzy confections still bristle with the same unfettered enthusiasm for retro kitsch, only now they come wrapped in a timeless pop sheen and confetti-sprinkled sharpness that's as inscrutable as it is enchanting.