St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,055 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Poetry
Lowest review score: 0 The Divergent Series: Insurgent
Score distribution:
1,055 movie reviews
  1. Star Trek Into Darkness offers much of what the fans expect and not much of what they don't. This character-driven vehicle is a supercharged example of cinematic craftsmanship.
  2. Although you don't have to be a sports fan to enjoy it, Moneyball is one of the best baseball movies imaginable.
  3. Beautifully but simply wrought by director Cindy Meehl, this deft documentary is a poignant reappraisal of what it means to be human.
  4. This is a kaleidoscopic valentine to a great city from a director who knows and loves his subject.
  5. Bernie could easily have gone horribly wrong. But Black and Linklater finesse this tricky material with as much virtuosity as Bernie brings to that broccoli.
  6. The reason District 9 reverberates so loudly is because its moral indignation is cranked to 11.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Most of all, it’s a magical feat, one that turns puppets into personalities and an English meadow into Anderson’s world.
  7. Among recent documentaries, First Position soars to the head of the class.
  8. Particularly memorable are scenes in which Calvin loses his cool as Ruby holds onto her calm. It all adds up to a movie that's sparklingly entertaining.
  9. May be too cute to qualify as high art, but it's highly entertaining.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    There are no false Hollywood dramatics, no musical cues telling us how we should feel about this boy's battle for dignity and a place in the world. The director lets complex emotions flow naturally out of believable action and dialogue in this very faithful adaptation of a fascinating memoir. [20 August 1993, p.3F]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  10. Although it's slow to unfold, this courtroom drama is so timelessly humane and even-handed it feels like it came from the dockets of Solomon - by way of Sidney Lumet.
  11. Gilroy vividly evokes both the LA exteriors and newsroom interiors, and the action sequences are fraught with tension.
  12. Nowhere Boy is too astutely written and directed to go to predictably melodramatic extremes.
  13. Allen has been criticized for leaving some of the plot lines up in the air and several characters in the lurch. But he seems to be making a point: Neat Hollywood endings are as phony and dangerous as Cristal's ramblings.
  14. As they build up steam, two powerful actors keep us wondering whether this train is bound for war or peace.
  15. It's a well-earned curtain call for some of the most beloved characters in one of the best-sustained feats of recent cinema.
  16. Like the recent "Greenberg," Cyrus is not the jokey, polished production you would expect from its Hollywood cast and LA setting, but audiences who are comfortable with discomfort should find it "funny."
  17. The finale is heavy on CGI. But it never takes away from this respectable entry into the horror genre that values chills over kills.
  18. Ultimately, William Kunstler: Disturbing the Universe is a defense, not a prosecution, and the principal witness remains a shining star.
  19. This thriller about the game-changing website Wikileaks is as smart about cyberspace as “The Social Network,” but there’s a glitch when it shifts the focus from felonious leaders to the misdemeanors of the man who exposed them.
  20. With Labor Day, director Jason Reitman turns a Nicholas Sparks scenario into an Alfred Hitchcock creep-show.
  21. Skarsgard, who is perhaps best known for "Good Will Hunting" and "Breaking the Waves," makes the most of his rich role, imbuing Ulrik with a knockabout charm.
  22. The kids in the movie, from musicians to marital artists, are unusually skillful, and Smith seems assured of more starring roles. By the end of The Karate Kid, we can't help cheering, even when we know we've been sucker-punched.
  23. It bodes well for the future of the franchise that Renner and Weisz share not only a gripping predicament but something more important: chemistry.
  24. It's often obscenely funny, but it tickles more than it stings.
  25. At once an intriguing character study and a refreshingly offbeat romance.
  26. Sex and the City 2 will never be compared to "The Godfather, Part II." But it's everything a fan could want in a sequel.
  27. Cold in July has all the qualifications of a midnight movie in the making.
  28. Footnote is faintly comic, and director Joseph Cedar mines dark humor from the humiliations of identity checks and pecking orders.

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