St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 389 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Returned: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Tucker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 267
  2. Negative: 0 out of 267
267 tv reviews
  1. There's a plot, which any of us could have written in our sleep.
  2. Every single thing about Crowded feels familiar, as if we've seen it many times, which we have.
  3. The acting is pretty much non-existent, casting is weak, and the special effects are unimpressive. But there's some terrific makeup work on some of the non-human creatures around, and somebody went to the trouble of deciding that a space station for many different species would have to be equipped with many different environments to accommodate them...Nice touch. [22 Feb 1993, p.5D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  4. “I am confused about everything,” Peter tells his girlfriend before fleeing the scene of a bully smackdown. Sampling The Messengers, you may be too.
  5. There are nice moments, especially from Holloway, whose quips are vastly more clever than the rest of the show.
  6. Szymanski, who directed from a script by Murray Miller, gets the look of the documentary, including some real footage mixed with new scenes made to look vintage, just right. The tone, though, is so broad, we never for a second forget the “mocku” in the “mentary.”
  7. The original pilot was a mess, confusing and annoyingly full of holes, but an extremely well-cast mess with a lot of potential. [17 Sept 1995, p.6C]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  8. Saldana seems to be sleepwalking through most of it, and we rarely feel Rosemary’s fear. Rather than jumping in your seat, you’re more likely to pick up a magazine.
  9. Do No Harm expects us to accept the dual-personality premise without grounding it in anything believable.
  10. Some of the special effects are magical; others are genuinely terrifying. But with so many characters, and such an abundance of twists and turns and truths and lies, keeping up is exhausting even in the first two hours. And none of the characters, especially the mopey Quentin, is engaging enough to make it worth the effort.
  11. The Expanse cuts viewers no slack. It plunges so quickly into its world that you may think, as I did, that you accidentally failed to watch the first episode.... Colorful characters, banter and some zero-gravity sex are more selling points.
  12. The pace is generally fast enough to distract from the convoluted plot.
  13. The Next adds a door-knock component, providing a Publishers Clearing House-style surprise, and has the stars hang out with their proteges at home, which isn't really as entertaining as you'd think.
  14. If you enjoy animal sight gags, Animal Practice will provide at least a few laughs.
  15. It's summer, and this is a scripted, first-run network TV series. That's something. And maybe everyone hasn't seen a dozen dramas with similar troubled-family plots, many (Netflix's "Bloodline," for instance) much craftier.
  16. It's hard to know where a middling comedy will go from just the pilot.
  17. Long on scenery and even longer on schmaltz. The kids are fine; Gregory Smith is the show's strongest link as complicated, 15-year-old Ephram, and Vivian Cardone ("A Beautiful Mind") is off-the-scale adorable as 9-year-old Delia. But Williams' conversion to small-town doctor seems forced, and so do the quirks of Everwood residents. It's nothing that a prescription for better writing couldn't fix, however. [16 Sept 2002, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  18. Everything about this new summer show is confounding. Is it horror? Political satire? Slapstick comedy?
  19. Saving Hope is pretty easy to watch, despite its abundant potential for eye-rolling.
  20. The writing is clunky and the acting is almost universally stiff. The characters need to be much more engaging to keep us from wanting to jump overboard from The Last Ship.
  21. An occasionally funny new TV Land comedy.
  22. The Firm is tedious but not terrible; whether it will be watchable depends, one, on how much you like legal procedurals and, two, how the ongoing McDeeres-in-jeopardy plot is handled in future episodes.
  23. The Whispers (created by Soo Hoo and claiming Steven Spielberg as an executive producer) is too slow and self-consciously creepy to hold my attention for long. Your response may vary.
  24. As for the story, it's so murky and convoluted that following it requires a lot of work--far too much work for something so flat-out ridiculous.
  25. Perhaps over that time, it will evolve into the buddy dramedy it needs to be. Until then, though, it's just another police procedural, and prime time already has plenty of those.
  26. So mainstream, it makes "L.A. Law" look like experimental theater. It's not bad, just very familiar. [4 Mar 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  27. It's ridiculous, but it doesn't bite.
  28. "Awws" are more frequent than laughs.
  29. Meyers is likable and pleasant, and the first show probably isn't a good indication of what his Late Night will eventually be like. In the early going, though, there isn't much fresh happening there.
  30. It's too silly for real horror fans and too gross for the fainthearted.
  31. Adam Horowitz, Edward Kitsis and Ian B. Goldberg ("Once Upon a Time") created Dead of Summer, and they have paid more attention to the moody atmosphere and opportunities for scares than to the characters--at least, the living ones.
  32. I suspect that viewers who know the Bible well will be annoyed by "The Bible," while those who are casual students will be alternately mildly entertained and fairly bored. People with no religious beliefs probably won't watch anyway, but if they do, they could wind up confused or amused.
  33. The audience is expected somehow to understand the range of her abilities, but sorry; we need more clues. That, and a reason to care.
  34. A loud, old-school comedy with Laurie Metcalf ("Roseanne") as mom Marjorie and Tyler Ritter (look-alike younger son of the late John Ritter) as gay son Ronny.
  35. Caruso is stiff and grim, and the crew doesn't click with him or one another. [23 Sep 2002]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  36. The tone is mostly dreary and the plot with few exceptions goes precisely where you expect.
  37. It's still hard to expect much out of a sitcom arriving on broadcast TV in summer. In the case of NBC's Undateable, that's a good attitude. If you get a few laughs out of it, great. Otherwise, no hopes will be dashed.
  38. Adapted from a Dutch series that was surely better than this, Red Widow is trite and tedious.
  39. Unfortunately, this Dracula isn’t fun at all. It’s not really scary, either, although it does spill a lot of blood.
  40. Enjoying Timecop either requires putting your mind entirely into neutral or simply deciding to suspend a lot of disbelief. I couldn't suspend enough, so I wound up worrying about little things like why the folks of Victorian London, which he visits in tonight's opener, don't think Logan's spiky 1997 haircut is one bit peculiar. [22 Sept 1997]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  41. Moments of sweetness, but too few laughs - and way too many sexual references. [8 Sep 2002]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  42. Uneven, from amusing to embarrassing. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  43. In short, tight, low-cut everything, with her talents always on prominent display, Cox appears so much older than the baby-faced Von Esmarch that their relationship looks perverted, if not illegal. [8 Oct 2000, p.F6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  44. The writing is clunky, Phillippe is stiff and Lewis overacts like a cop in some parody of cop shows.
  45. Zoo has 13 hours, and many more animals, to make some sense of its zany story, but the leaden dialogue is almost certainly to make that seem much, much longer.
  46. Unfortunately, the premiere is more depressing than scary, often feeling as if we're being sucked slowly into quicksand.
  47. The dialogue Arquette is forced to deliver is the worst thing.
  48. What Chasing Life mainly raises, though, is eyebrows, for being so laughably bad.
  49. A grim and goofy sci-fi saga.
  50. One Big Happy isn't fresh or funny enough to transcend its message.
  51. The lead characters for whom we're supposed to root in Manhattan Love Story feel as slapped together as people stranded at a speed-dating event.
  52. Everything about The Catch is annoying, from the basic premise to the impossible twists to especially (somehow, especially) the insistent soundtrack that is supposed to whip us into a froth of excitement.
  53. The series itself turns out to be less "candid and comic" (as HBO puts it) than tired and tacky. [4 June 1998, p.G6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  54. It's all too cringe-worthy, even as Wilson goes all out to show us that she's happy the joke's on her. Even if you applaud her for that, Super Fun Night is not funny enough to be so sad.
  55. Knepper is wonderfully creepy. But that's the last of the good news. From Rockne S. O'Bannon, Cult is too complicated for its own good, and not satisfying enough to make it worth figuring out.
  56. Superstore improves somewhat, or at least becomes faster-paced, in two more episodes provided for preview, including one that will air second Monday night. It also becomes cruder and more outright bizarre, which is probably a promising sign. In the early going, though, it isn't quite as funny as something you'd see in a real big-box store in St. Louis any given weekend.
  57. Uncle Buck needs to be smarter, funnier, and, honestly, a different show. Epps too deserves better.
  58. This American version incorporates the redneck humor so beloved in reality TV these days with battle-of-the-sexes cliches that should have been retired in the '70s.
  59. Relaxed as he seems on stage, he's just that stiff when acting. And that, unfortunately, is most of the time.
  60. Sheen and Bruce Helford ("The Drew Carey Show") have conspired here to create a show completely free of ambition to be anything except a showcase for Charlie Sheen.
  61. Rob is a scream, and not in a good way.
  62. The most puzzling thing about Are You There, Chelsea? is who exactly thought it was a good idea. Because it's not.
  63. Unfortunately, beyond the strained concept, it has ridiculous dialogue and ludicrous situations that the best actors in the world couldn't salvage.
  64. The Sharknado 3 team is clearly just making up the most ridiculous stuff possible at this point.
  65. Morris Chestnut is pretty, and so is Miami, but this show wastes them both.
  66. Phillip Winchester gets tangled up with Wesley Snipes in Las Vegas in a muddled scenario that involves predicting crimes and seeking vengeance.
  67. Its problem is too much Ken Jeong. His manic energy takes over every frame of the pilot, at the expense of anything and anyone else in the show.
  68. One of the new season's bigger disappointments. The frantic pace of this action drama, set behind the scenes in a casino security firm, can't disguise the shallow story-telling and annoying, badly developed characters. James Caan is wasted as the boss, and Josh Duhamel got much better stuff to work with on "All My Children." [22 Sept 2003, p.E6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  69. Killing Jesus is apparently satisfied to look and sound vaguely cheesy.
  70. All the characters lie on the couch a lot. While it's noted that they do have jobs, they seem to spend most of their time eating Oreos and watching TV. (Hey, that's my life. . . .) And they talk, but most of what they have to say isn't very funny. [22 Sept 1994, p.6G]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  71. It's completely ridiculous.
  72. Relentlessly grimy and brutally violent, Outsiders is an exhausting trek through mountain muck.
  73. Moody and bloody, directed ridiculously by Melanie Aitkenhead, it's a reanimated corpse of a movie that nobody needed.
  74. The writing is cliched, the characters cartoonish and the action tedious, punctured by bloodshed.
  75. A cruel and stupid show built around one Matt Hicks, who vaguely resembles Britain's Prince Harry.
  76. If you're in the Sharknado fan club, you'll probably like the sequel. If not, you'll probably ignore it and watch something else. In either case, enjoy.
  77. Save yourself. Run from Stalker.
  78. All this suggests a by-the-numbers romance novel, but some romance novels are involving, or fun, or lively. Not Mistresses.
  79. Jane Lynch is, to put it kindly, unbearable. (Trust me; that was putting it kindly.)
  80. Black people and white people can be best friends, and that's the truth. Apparently, however, that friendship can't be funny, or so Truth Be Told easily convinces us.
  81. Well, nothing much happens. Danny is a good excuse for a nap. [27 Sept 2001, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  82. By the time the show ended, I disliked it a lot, but I kept an open mind. ... I watched it a second time. And a third time. I now believe I can praise Bochco and ABC for trying to do something different and, at the same time, say that "Cop Rock" is a bomb of major proportions. [17 Sep 1990, p.1D]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  83. Run! Run fast and far from We Are Men.
  84. Even more obnoxious, although that hardly seems possible, is NBC's Hidden Hills, a crude and unfunny comedy about suburban families. [24 Sept 2002, p.E8]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  85. This is, hands down, the worst series of the year, with the most annoying lead character in a season with many annoying lead characters.
  86. The worst of the new season's sitcom crop, Tucker is crude, unfunny and mean-spirited. The only appropriate response is an urge to call child services and have the young star taken into custody. [2 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  87. Dads is so unfunny that we have plenty of time to contemplate how distasteful the show really is.

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