St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

For 440 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 UnReal: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Black Box: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 303
  2. Negative: 0 out of 303
303 tv reviews
  1. Sneaky Pete is less weird [than Netflix's "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events"] but still wonderful.
  2. Involving, enjoyable TV. [5 Oct 1999, p.D6]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  3. This sunny and touching yarn feels like just what we need in these angst-ridden days.
  4. The Bridge translates brilliantly, fitting into its new setting so perfectly, you’d never imagine it had aired in any other incarnation.
  5. Two later episodes parody the TV series "Vice" and "Nanook of the North," the 1922 silent film credited with launching the documentary genre. Both are well done, and each has a twist. Each also has an awful lot of Hader and Armisen in costume, so take that as an endorsement or as a caution, depending on your feeling about them. I didn't laugh, but maybe you will.
  6. A Canadian-South African co-production, it's gracefully directed by Clement Virgo ("The Wire") and gorgeously filmed, mostly in South Africa. Soapy? A little, but so was "Roots."
  7. It is exciting and involving; its leads are charismatic; and most of all, it feels fresh. [18 Sep 1994]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  8. Anyone still missing "Parenthood," or "Brothers and Sisters" before that, should grab the tissues and settle in for tonight's This Is Us.
  9. Atmospheric, showing a side of Italy no travelogue would touch, Gomorrah is also fast-paced, covering so much ground in two episodes provided for preview that most series would already be over.
  10. McDonald is flawless in her performances of Holiday’s songs, nailing the jazzy-bluesy (or was it bluesy-jazzy?) delivery. Her own voice is pure and clear, but McDonald captures Holiday’s rough sound, rougher still and sometimes slurred at the end of her life.
  11. If The A Word sounds dark and depressing, it isn't. Joe's autism is the central plot point, but this is also a messy soap opera about a family that's always butting heads.
  12. The final Downton season is satisfying, engaging and nostalgic.
  13. In the Flesh, which runs just three hours over the three nights, is best not analyzed too deeply for meaning and just enjoyed for its odd and fascinating concept.
  14. Indian Summers, created and written by Paul Rutman, is great to look at, and intriguing, but the storytelling is so deliberately opaque that the plot is hard to follow.
  15. Only the darkness of the show is disconcerting. Poignancy is great, and presumably Clark will triumph in his battles against evil. But in post-Columbine, post-Sept. 11 America, humor has never been a more valuable commodity. If Smallville can strike the right balance, the series should fly. [16 Oct 2001, p.F1]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  16. The Knick (rated TV-MA, and definitely for mature audiences only) can be difficult to watch. Medical procedures are graphic, as are scenes involving Thackery’s drug use. But this is one riveting drama.
  17. There is a lot to admire about Queen Sugar. But the premiere, which airs without commercials, is as slow as, well, molasses.
  18. Bessie, with a gorgeous soundtrack performed largely by Latifah, tells this story in far less simplistic fashion. Rees dramatizes Smith’s demons in powerful, sometimes chaotic fashion, jumping back in time to show her as an abused child and depicting her adult life in vignettes that don’t always flow together.
  19. Smart, sweet and often hilarious, "Will & Grace" is everything a sitcom needs to be. [21 Sep 1998]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  20. There's a lot of setup, and we don't know these people well enough yet to laugh with them instead of at them. That begins to change quickly, though, as Fresh Off the Boat gets into its groove, humanizing its characters and upping its humor quotient.
  21. "Without a Trace" offers sharp writing, stylish directing and a cast with real chemistry. [26 Sep 2002]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  22. Hugh Laurie is cranky, scathingly honest, brilliant Dr. Gregory House, whose amazing diagnostic abilities almost make up for his abrasive personality, in the Fox medical drama House. [16 Nov 2004, p.E06]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  23. If Seasons 1 through 4 have bored or baffled or just annoyed you, Season 5 won't win you over. If, on the other hand, you greet the return of Downton with unabashed affection, as I admittedly do, you won't be disappointed, even if some of the storylines feel like reruns, or even when you want to grab a character by the shoulders and shake him or her.
  24. Shot single-camera style with no laugh track (a blessing on a network where originals are often really loud), Younger feels far more grounded than its premise would suggest.
  25. [An] ambitious, wildly energetic and mostly entertaining Grease: Live. Despite a few missteps, and even though, at three hours, the production seemed incredibly long, Grease: Live was above all a lot of fun.
  26. Ray Donovan is fun, but it’s also heart-breakingly sad and deadly serious, sometimes all at once. In all cases, this is one of the smartest series to come around in a while, sharply written (by creator and executive producer Ann Biderman) with a perfect balance of comedy and tragedy, action and reflection.
  27. Wonderfully warped...Expect both sly satire and big belly laughs from this summer treat. [4 Aug 1998]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch
  28. The structure of Big Little Lies, virtually identical to that of the novel, makes getting into it a chore. ... Gorgeously shot, neatly directed and beautifully acted from start to finish, Big Little Lies is an achievement in almost every way.
  29. This isn't a workplace drama with flying, though; a dark back story soon surfaces that could raise the stakes.
  30. One of the sweet surprises of the season, a family sitcom that manages to be realistic without being either silly or mean-spirited. It's funny, too. [12 Sep 1996]
    • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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