St. Louis Post-Dispatch's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,000 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Django Unchained
Lowest review score: 25 Marmaduke
Score distribution:
1,000 movie reviews
  1. What makes this low-key movie memorable are the pitch-perfect performances.
  2. Titanic technical achievement.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Most of all, it’s a magical feat, one that turns puppets into personalities and an English meadow into Anderson’s world.
  3. It's often obscenely funny, but it tickles more than it stings.
  4. Until a devastatingly effective finale, Monsieur Lazhar is an exercise in delicacy, carried by Fallag's gentle performance and a fine cast of kid actors.
  5. There's so much higher intelligence in Project Nim that simply digesting it feels like evolutionary progress.
  6. Typically lovely to look at, with big-eyed young people espousing high ideals amid natural splendor. But outside of their bubble, a prickly history looms, and Miyazaki’s dubious attitude toward the wartime role of his hero makes the movie a mixed blessing.
  7. For better or worse, this is a straightforward performance film.
  8. Hogancamp's alliance with director Jeff Malmberg in this artful and poignant film marks a victory in the war against the self.
  9. The result, Pina, is the most spirited and spectacular film about dance since Robert Altman's "The Company."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    All of the performances are skilled, and yet it's Weaver (a veteran screen, television and stage actress in Australia) who, in a smaller role, creates the character who stays with you.
  10. For cinematic sojourners, Hugo is a trip to the moon.
  11. Despite the obvious mismatches involved, this isn’t a simplistic smackdown. Freighted with weighty issues, Captain Phillips is a film worth debating.
  12. Garcia’s performance, which won the best actress award at last year’s Berlin International Film Festival, is a marvel of self-effacing artistry.
  13. Up in the Air may not end up as the best picture -- that will be decided by the Academy -- but it has landed in the middle of the discussion because it's laser-focused and right on time.
  14. The Holocaust must never be forgotten, but like many well-intentioned documentaries, The Flat derives more power from the implicit strength of the subject than from the explicit choices of the director.
  15. What makes Love Is Strange so special is that the challenges the couple face are more mundane than menacing.
  16. Ajami is neither a puzzle nor a polemic. It's an admirably even-handed portrait of life in an occupied ghetto that is bounded by checkpoints. Everyone we meet is a more or less honorably motivated victim of circumstance. That the circumstances were inscribed centuries ago makes Ajami a tragedy of biblical proportions.
  17. The Illusionist has surprises up its sleeve that are unusually nuanced for an animated movie.
  18. Canadian director Denis Villaneuve knows how to stoke a hot debate about the legacy of violence. But in this case, where there's smoke, there's not enough air.
  19. Because Short Term 12 is a small movie about a challenging subject, you may have to accept my word that actress Brie Larson and director Destin Cretton are bright discoveries, but it shouldn’t be long before the wider world can see these talents with the naked eye.
  20. A marvelous piece of work.
  21. Gerwig makes us want to believe that in a city where anything is possible, Francis Ha has the last laugh.
  22. Director Lindholm is a graduate of the Dogma school, and he is able to maintain tension with a documentary camera technique, virtually no music and minimal on-screen theatrics.
  23. When the two men compare impersonations of Michael Caine or Sean Connery, Brydon's version is always slightly better - and Coogan knows it.
  24. There’s much to appreciate here. Like “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” which had a stronger sense of its place in the world, this coming-of-age movie should appeal to smart, sensitive young people who haven’t been exposed to the better examples of the genre.
  25. Although the film has elements of a puzzler by Michelangelo Antonioni and a psychodrama by Ingmar Bergman, it never becomes compellingly intellectual or unnervingly emotional.
  26. Footnote is faintly comic, and director Joseph Cedar mines dark humor from the humiliations of identity checks and pecking orders.
  27. Marley is thus a valuable history project but not a definitive or analytical one. For that, we await a film that's less "One Love" and more "Stir It Up."
  28. A stark, contemplative and hauntingly brilliant film.

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