Tampa Bay Times' Scores

  • Movies
For 505 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 All Is Lost
Lowest review score: 0 I'm Still Here
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 505
505 movie reviews
  1. The jokes fly at a pace demanding viewers to either refrain from laughing (highly unlikely) or see The Lego Movie again to catch all the wondrous sights and amiable wit sliding by the first time.
  2. With The Past, Farhadi again displays a gift for poking into corners of nondescript lives and discovering unique drama.
  3. This is a gorgeous production, even by Miyazaki's standards.
  4. The Grand Budapest Hotel is as artistically manicured as any of his seven previous movies, and richer comically and emotionally than most.
  5. Kaur and Khan, who was robbed of a IIFA nod, scarcely share a frame of The Lunchbox, yet the emotional connection of their characters is palpable.
  6. It's a refreshing change from run-of-the-kill horror. Nothing in Splice feels done merely for the moment -- it's to creep you out later.
  7. What's fun is how the new Karate Kid embraces and vastly improves the cliches, keeping the plot cleverly updated for a generation that never heard of Ralph Macchio.
  8. Rapace is a magnetic presence in a far-ranging mystery requiring such a solid character to orbit around.
  9. There's much more to the adventure, a deft balance of fantasy and teen angst that never loses its contemporary sense of humor.
  10. The A-Team is literally a blast, from the opening credits containing more thrills than the average shoot-'em-up (and more laughs than some comedies), to a climactic orgy of CGI destruction.
  11. Quirky to the brink of exhaustion, the latest from Jean-Pierre Jeunet is a live-action Looney Tune complete with Acme contraptions and wily coyotes.
  12. Tangled would be a satisfying adventure on plot and 3D sensations alone.
  13. It's gory and gut-wrenching but strangely life-affirming.
  14. Redford proves that at 75 he can still choose meaningful projects and deliver them with intelligence.
  15. The plot is a piffle but Ozon's presentation is gloriously romantic.
  16. Part two is even more gorgeous to behold, and deeper in substance.
  17. Warrior is a surprising gut punch, a modern-day "Rocky" saga with two mixed martial arts pugs trying to beat, choke and kick the system.
  18. Scott briskly blends the high-minded stuff with impressive boo-and-goo sequences, ratcheting tension in tight spots and dark caverns.
  19. Robot & Frank occasionally strains for emotion and stretches credulity, even for such fantasy circumstances. But it has two hearts - one human, one not - in the right place, and intelligence that is anything but artificial.
  20. Johnson keeps it simple, yet never stupid. Looper is a puzzle engaging your brain, rather than frying it, as one character describes the process. Obviously he has seen enough movies on the subject by 2024 to know how frustrating that is. This one plays fair with the fantasy.
  21. Exhilarating drama, and a triumphant return to glory for both Zemeckis and Washington.
  22. Never has 3-D illusion been used to such pure storytelling effect.
  23. Thanks to Jackson's involvement as a producer, Berg has time and access Berlinger and Sinofsky didn't, allowing expansion of whatever material that's repeated.
  24. It's a story languorously told in three chapters, the first two in the late 1980s and the third 15 years later. Each could be a movie unto themselves. Together they prove Cianfrance to be an effectively unobtrusive storyteller, crafting without artifice what book critics would call a page turner.
  25. A feel-good movie in the most positive meaning of that term, thanks to the Motown music and O'Dowd's cheeky charm.
  26. Ready to Wear is a comedy - one of Altman's funniest - but it's the humor of humiliation, of the characters and the industry. [23 Dec 1994, p.16]
  27. Plenty of secrets are uncovered before the fadeout, plus another nugget dropped midway through the end credits that may render nearly everything beforehand to be false. That's the nature of intimacies submerged so long then revealed.
  28. The East is a crackling thriller and a political statement tough to peg.
  29. World War Z presents an abundance of relatively plausible action, smart solutions and one useful piece of information: When the zombiepocalypse comes, the undead are flying coach.
  30. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire is movie escapism made with intelligence, and that doesn't come around often enough. As I sensed this movie ending I wished it wouldn't, and when it did I wanted the next one now. Take that, Bilbo.

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