The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,845 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Advanced Style
Lowest review score: 0 Species II
Score distribution:
3,845 movie reviews
  1. Clever and confident use of limited resources in an unfamiliar medium. Kenneth Branagh has made the right choice nine out of 10 times, and the tenth is easily forgiven because of the youthful ardor of that bright face and that bright talent. [10 Nov 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Gillian Armstrong's adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's 1868 novel is lively and thoughtful and beautifully formed. [21 Dec 1994]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  2. Lethal Weapon sinks an unexpectedly sharp hook at a delightfully unique angle, and never once lets up. A purposefully off- kilter flick, it fakes one way and moves another, thwarting our conditioned responses and fuelling our happy surprise. [6 Mar 1987, p.D1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  3. Big
    Sure, the premise is identical age-reversal comedies, but this one uses a much higher octane, animating a tired idea with a timeless script, and the result is pop humor at its most appealing - wit and charm spiced with a measured pinch of farce and just the right hint of melancholy. [3 Jun 1988, p.E1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Animal House is the sort of film you hate yourself for laughing at. It is so gross and tasteless you feel you should be disgusted but it's hard to be offended by something that is so sidesplittingly funny. [05 Aug 1978]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  4. The film takes its cue from the widow, neither sermonizing or even villainizing, content to serve quietly as an admirable exercise in restraint and a moving example of the grace under pressure that is the essence of courage.
  5. A French rat as a master chef? Absurd. But a brilliant French chef with an American accent? C'est grotesque!
  6. Authentic, fresh and utterly relevant.
  7. Both the most bewildering of the three movies and also the most brutally compelling.
  8. The movies have given us plenty of loquacious teenagers – from such fast-talking truants as Ferris Bueller to such overachieving political animals as Tracy Flick ( Election). Hal Hefner is not one of these kids.
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  9. This much is inarguable: In the more than two flamboyant hours of Across the Universe, Julie Taymor doesn't cheat us for a single second.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If the roots of terrorism are hopelessly snarled, Terror's Advocate does a very good job of exposing some of the soil in which they grow.
  10. Persepolis is as modern as tomorrow's headlines and as classic as an ancient myth.
  11. That's not to say that There Will Be Blood isn't something exceptional; it's just that the movie is jarringly erratic, ranging from moments of delicacy to majesty to over-the-top bombast.
  12. Though Burton's version is faithful, the filter of his sensibility has turned it into another of his necrophilic creepshows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Perhaps Jia is trying to prove the point that the future has already arrived. Or perhaps he is suggesting that the truth is stranger than science fiction. This is today's China: Anything is possible.
  13. Relentlessly dark but expertly rendered, it shares its cinematographer and quality of aggrieved compassion with another recent Romanian art house hit, "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu."
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It might seem, from 2002's "Gerry" to his ersatz Kurt Cobain biopic, "Last Days," that Gus Van Sant has been making the same movie: an enigmatic and poetic paean to (teenaged) male beauty, disaffection and inscrutability.
  14. For all its fuss and fury, Flight of the Red Balloon succeeds magnificently.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Like a Keret story, Jellyfish is economical – a mere 78 minutes – but it packs into its taut, intersecting storylines a charming melancholy and a surprisingly rich depth.
  15. Before that marvel of human engineering - China's Three Gorges Dam - completes its legacy of human upheaval, there are vanishing sights to be seen.
  16. All this is as fascinating as it is humbling, even when Herzog ventures a little too far down eccentricity's back alley.
  17. Mock-heroic yet still lyrical, faux-mythic but honest too, uniquely and absurdly and often hilariously Canadian, My Winnipeg is like no documentary you've ever seen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The Last Mistress proves that Breillat has found something in the luscious language of the 19th century that makes sense to us today.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Marsh's most remarkable directorial achievement, however, is preserving the original sense of amazement and awe when watching historical footage and still photographs of Petit walking that tightrope up in the sky.
  18. Much of what happens in Silent Light can feel painstakingly mundane: milking cows, harvesting wheat, a long drive at night in and out of shadows. Yet throughout, there's a sense of something ominous impending, and while it remains gentle, the ending is genuinely startling.
  19. Modestly clever, this is definitely a little thing. Enjoy.
  20. It has the staccato wit of a drawing-room comedy, the fatal flaw of a tragic romance and the buzzy immediacy of a front-page headline, all powered by a kinetic engine typically found in an action flick. And that's just the opening scene.
  21. Guy and Madeline is a decidedly modern film, whose frightened, impulsive, charming characters could walk into our lives tomorrow.
  22. Yes, The King's Speech is a lively burst of populist rhetoric, superbly performed and guaranteed to please even discriminating crowds.

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