The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,662 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Your Friends & Neighbors
Lowest review score: 0 Employee of the Month
Score distribution:
3,662 movie reviews
  1. It's got thrills and chills and one of the most elegantly conceived monsters in the history of movies.
  2. An unusually smartly written and performed American independent film.
  3. The cinematic equivalent of a "good read" - pick it up and you can't put it down; put it down and it's gone forever.
  4. Pick your cliche - searing, rivetting, haunting - Keitel delivers a performance to rival Brando's in "Last Tango In Paris."
  5. Frankly, with so much to feast my dazzled eyes upon, I barely noticed that the plot was missing in action. And that's because the action itself is so pure.
  6. The comedy is warm and witty and wafer-thin, as easy on the palate as a raspberry sorbet on a summer afternoon.
  7. The film is an attack on religious hypocrisy, mixing melodrama and black humour in a volatile blend.
  8. The climax, however, is far superior here, open-ended and ambiguous and neatly linked to this film's recurring metaphor: Teeth, of course, which "outlast everything," which survive the death of the body just as marriage can survive the demise of love. They both endure, yellowed and rootless.
  9. By its third act, Okwe has found his solution and Dirty Pretty Things comes across as both clever but a little pat, another British drama about the misfits who pool their resources to defy the oppressive system, though it does not precisely leave a warm glow.
  10. A 75-minute tour de force that's often fascinating, sometimes frustrating, but ultimately rewarding. So be patient -- the payoff will come.
  11. Moore continues another one infinitely more valuable -- the proud line that extends right back to Mark Twain, embracing all those satirists so enamoured with America at its best that they won't stand silent for America at its worst.
  12. Beijing Bicycle is a good film that owes a huge debt to a better film. And that, of course, is Vittorio De Sica's "The Bicycle Thief."
  13. Amadeus needs an additional 20 minutes running time like "The Magic Flute" needs a drum solo. Though the production is gussied up with more frills and decoration than a Viennese dessert trolley, Forman is generally workmanlike in his visual style and very uneven with his handling of actors.
  14. This is a remarkably good-looking near-corpse of a film, with a pulse that fades in and out.
  15. Filled with a sweet, loopy sensibility and some fresh comic turns, Welcome to Collinwood is a low-budget American film that falls into the good-but-slight category.
  16. It's a nifty caper flick that also ponders the aesthetic nature of deception -- in other words, a solid work of craft that doubles as a little meditation on art.
  17. The best thing the film does is to show us not only what that mind looks like, but how the creative process itself operates: messily, erratically, outside of most people's morality, but with a force and purposiveness that makes the machinations of the rest of us look irresolute by comparison.
  18. Imperfect, but certainly provocative.
  19. A grownup departure from the teen-romance norm -- it speaks nothing about passion and volumes about trust.
  20. A painful documentary film, partly because of its subject, partly because of the troubling questions raised by the filmmaker's approach.
  21. A movie that is often as awkward and as filled with mixed impulses as the age it documents.
  22. At best, the humour in Election is perceptive, nasty, pointed, and lets no one off its barbed hook, not even the audience. In other words, it's a lovely piece of satire, made all the more relevant by the setting.
  23. Both a triumph of design and cinematic engineering and, at the same time, long, repetitious and naive.
  24. Somewhere between profound and ludicrous, kind of like a cross between "Waiting for Godot" and "Dude, Where's My Car?"
  25. A very funny, very unusual ensemble comedy that falls somewhere between slapdash and brilliant, an improvised comedy with more hits than misses. It's also an oddly touching tribute to the joys of show biz.
  26. Highly entertaining.
  27. This concoction, so bizarre to the adult mind, is actually a charming triumph where its intended under-12 audience is concerned.
  28. Each character in David Webb Peoples' dense, unexpectedly stately, non- violent script (the inevitable gore is employed sparingly) is treated with that same, somewhat distanced clarity.
  29. Always engaging and often compelling.
  30. Smart, serious and deftly composed, New York director Jill Sprecher's jigsaw anthology film, Thirteen Conversations About One Thing, is the kind of work you want to applaud just for its ambitions.

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