The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,236 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Carlos
Lowest review score: 0 Godzilla
Score distribution:
4236 movie reviews
  1. Chandor's shrewdest bit of business is figuring out how to make an A-list movie with a $3.5-million budget. Solution: buy low, sell high. Hire last decade's A-list – Spacey, Irons and Demi Moore – and give them their best parts in years.
  2. An unforgettable portrayal of the unglamorous gangster life, which is often short and never sweet.
  3. A classic... Edward Scissorhands is a sharp salute to the oddball in all of us.
  4. A masterpiece, but of a unique kind... A gorgeously filmed, supremely well-acted, intricately written film noir about now.
  5. Few directors working today make films with the grace and magisterial power of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's best work.
  6. Poised, delicate, powerful, hovering between poignancy and pealing laughter, it is a feast formed by skill and serendipity.
  7. Le Havre, offers the director's usual humour, pitch-perfect acting and compassionate message, with a Gallic twist that should win new converts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    But Turteltaub surprises us. He has the kind of unerring comic touch - easily able to carry his audience from smart dialogue to heart-tugging emotion to something awfully close to slapstick - that should serve the movie world well.
  8. This is where the movie excels. In the classic neo-realist tradition, it's scant in plot yet rich in mood and character, offering us a revealing hint here, a poignant glimpse there, with each revelation filtered through Michelle Williams's superbly muted performance, all the more moving for being so restrained.
  9. This is like no movie you've seen before, a haunting mixture of horror, history and fantasy that works simultaneously on every level.
  10. You don't need to have seen a lot of art films to love The Diaries of Vaslav Nijinsky. All it takes is compassionate curiosity and perhaps some lingering memory of the world as a child experiences it.
  11. British humour at its eclectic best, a deliciously heady mix of dry wit and ribald farce.
  12. One caveat: At the risk of sounding sexist, let me say A Prophet is an unreservedly male film. Female characters are few and far between, and when they do appear, they pretty much fall into either one of two categories – les mamans ou les putains.
  13. Reservoir Dogs sizzles - it's dynamite on a short fuse, and you watch it with mesmerized fascination, simultaneously attracted and repelled by the explosion you know will come.
  14. Dreamgirls is one of the best movie musicals in memory.
  15. What keeps the energy percolating is DiCaprio’s performance, in the loosest and most charismatic turn of his career.
  16. Take nothing seriously - not the action, not the gore, not the plot, not the theme. Instead, view Desperado as it's meant to be seen - a comedy - and you're in for an unalloyed treat; heck, you're in for one of the funniest flicks of the year.
  17. If the word masterpiece has any use these days, it must apply to the film Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, a mature, philosophically resonant work from Turkey's leading director, 53-year-old Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Climates, Distance, Three Monkeys).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Todd Haynes' Safe grips you with its air of antiseptic malevolence and leaves you gasping. You feel as disoriented as the protagonist, a young housewife suffering from 20th-century disease. [11 Aug 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  18. The best Canadian beer movie since "Strange Brew," and the best 1930s musical of the year, The Saddest Music in the World is the kind of exhaustingly delirious film that only Winnipeg director Guy Maddin could make.
  19. Eyes Wide Shut still towers above most of the movies out there, immersing the viewer in a web of emotional complexity, at once raw and personal and, at times, theatrically overcooked.
  20. This outing not only doesn't disappoint; it surpasses high expectations. This is a terrific, smartly designed adolescent adventure, visually rich, narratively satisfying, and bound to resonate for years to come.
  21. Consequently, Ephron is forced to shape and integrate the twin halves of the picture, and she does a splendid job - the intercutting is always fluid and never mechanical. Better yet, the script keeps surprising us, setting up stock situations and then pulling away from a stock treatment.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Star Wars is the most entertaining sci-fi movie of the decade.
  22. Kurt Russell has never seemed more clever, Mel Gibson more vulnerable nor Michelle Pfeiffer more goddess-like. Once upon a time, before the pictures got small and the hills were obscured by smog, the Hollywood sign read: "Hollywoodland." That was back when Tequila Sunrise, an intelligent, escapist epic for adults, wouldn't have seemed the anomaly it seems today. [2 Dec 1988, p.C1]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  23. The Long Day Closes is a twice-remarkable film. Once, because director Terence Davies opens his personal bottle of memories and makes them interesting to us. Twice, because, in doing so, he triggers our own memories. [11 June 1993]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  24. An uncommonly tender and observant documentary on the phenomenon that is "A Chorus Line."
  25. In short, Batman is terrific - funny, smart and sensitive too, the perfect cinematic date.
  26. The Witches of Eastwick is an uproarious and entirely successful attempt to examine the differences between the sexes by couching the examination in mythological terms. [12 June 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  27. Even hardened cynics will embrace the cliché – yep, you will laugh, you will cry.

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