The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,836 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Amour
Lowest review score: 0 People Like Us
Score distribution:
3,836 movie reviews
  1. To be fair, the movie is nothing if not consistent -- the idea is every bit as dumb as the execution.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    If Leguizamo imports a hint of pathos into his performance, Waterston adds a dollop of menace to hers, delivering another of Ross's attacks on what separates girls from men. In this world, women are their own worst enemy.
  2. McCarthy delivers the moment of pathos in a totally different voice, tears staining her puffy face, as feelings awfully real and tainted in tragedy bubble up from deep within the comic persona. It’s startling, it’s wholly incongruous, yet it’s undeniably moving. God, how this woman can act and, within the brief frames of that different film, how we long to see the rest of it.
  3. This one is headed straight for star Tommy Lee Jones's career-blooper reel.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Cranked up at double speed, the plot of Flashdance could almost be a satirical fantasy about dance students. Although Flashdance doesn't admit it's a fantasy, neither does it succeed in looking realistic. [16 Apr 1983, p.E5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  4. Like nightmares, horror movies pull us down with them. And so the film keeps us in thrall for every one of its 134 minutes.
  5. Like Frankenstein's monster before the lightning strikes, it's all recycled cold flesh and bolts, without a twitch of originality.
  6. A superior entertainment to both "RE 1" and "Alien vs. Predator."
  7. The ninth film in the franchise is competent enough but it won’t freeze the heart or fire the imagination.
  8. Oh, it's perfect all right. In fact, The Perfect Score is a flawless example of the classic January movie release -- the kind of studio picture that even the studio loathes, and so consigns to the dumping ground of the year's frosty first month.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    An achingly sincere but often staggeringly inept attempt to introduce Walsch's message to movie audiences.
  9. Once again Anna Faris manages to be the best thing in another not very good Anna Faris movie.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    An occasionally inventive but ultimately plodding horror film.
  10. It's all meant, I suppose, to conjure up cold visions of Terminators and Robocops past, or, in this post-9/11 world, of bin Ladens and Bushes present. If so, conjure at will.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Though a few scenes drum up some intensity -- that green ham Gustave makes one last great appearance -- it's mostly grim, dull and ugly, three qualities that nobody wants in a piece of multiplex filler about a surly reptile.
  11. Dumb and Dumber 'n the hood.
  12. This time out, writer and director Mark Steven Johnson has bounced back with a movie so full of camp spirit it should come with tents and a marshmallow roast.
  13. While the outdoor sequences were filmed in New Zealand's Woodhill State Forest – the movie's most stunning 3-D moments – Yogi Bear does feature notable "Canadian content" via two Ottawa-born thespians.
  14. All the borderline pantomime acting and wigged buffoonery is deliberate and silly, but The Three Musketeers remains charmless, a romp brought down by its lead-footed script.
  15. The missing ingredient, of course, is script.
  16. Not quite repellent enough to avoid tedium, Hannibal Rising is both too familiar in portraying Hannibal as a Dracula-like aristocrat monster, and crud in its exploitation of wartime atrocities.
  17. With no help from the dialogue, Kidman doesn't have a clue how to make clueless interesting. Not for lack of trying. Her efforts, which often consist of channelling Elizabeth Montgomery by way of Marilyn Monroe, are painful but insistent.
  18. Mostly though, The Back-up Plan feels like a movie aimed right at the funny bones of four-year-olds.
  19. Isn't just ordinarily lame, it easily exceeds any normal requirements for witless sleaze.
  20. Formula sequel right down to its zany subtitle -- Armed and Fabulous. Bullock deserves better. We deserve better. Rev up that '57 Chevy.
  21. Meant to be a nodding aside to the film buff, with plenty of in-jokes for the cognoscenti, Crimewave ends up as a random list in dire need of a good file-clerk. [3 July 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This paint-by-numbers romantic comedy is chock-a-block with jokey stereotypes – Americans are obnoxious, Canadians polite, and the Greeks just dance – yet lacking in any real drama, only occasionally mustering enough charm or humour to rise above a predictable formula.
  22. Being risibly bad, The Happening is at least worth a laugh. Exactly one laugh, by my reckoning, and completely unintended but no less full-throated for that.
  23. Can't have an American Thanksgiving without a turkey.
  24. LawAbiding Citizen smells a bit musty these days. Indeed, in an era when the debate has shifted from too little state vigilance to too damn much, this thing seems almost quaint.

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