The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,441 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Eyes Wide Shut
Lowest review score: 0 Senseless
Score distribution:
4441 movie reviews
  1. With no help from the dialogue, Kidman doesn't have a clue how to make clueless interesting. Not for lack of trying. Her efforts, which often consist of channelling Elizabeth Montgomery by way of Marilyn Monroe, are painful but insistent.
  2. A layabout movie -- not risibly bad, just relentlessly sub-par.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When Uptown Girls isn't trying to play up its wacky high jinks -- and those tend to be so weak they can't possibly float the film -- it stoops to the kind of psychological character development films this shallow should really avoid like the plague.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Full of poop and pratfalls, Daddy Day Care's abrasive marketing campaign promises a fresh slice of hell. So for it not to cause physical pain to any viewer over the age of five is a considerable achievement.
  3. Throbbing musical crescendos and flickery flashbacks abound but apart from some outlandish plot machinations, nothing here is good or bad enough to be memorable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ambitious but generic martial-arts movie.
  4. There are the usual gaggle of embarrassing friends, a lot of voice-over and montages, a wedding, a funeral and wait … something’s missing. Oh, right. Hugh Grant.
  5. No matter how you judge it -- as a strict morality play or simply a psychological thriller -- Apt Pupil just doesn't make the grade.
  6. Sometimes, a strong premise makes for a weak movie, which ends up drowning in its own clever conceit.
  7. Lola Versus is all Greta all the time, a bonanza for fans and proof that Gerwig's easy offbeat charm, obvious smarts and physical comedy gifts can carry a film.
  8. Under better circumstances, Cooper might be said to have stolen the picture outright. But as it is, and compelling as he is, there's just nothing here to steal.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    On screen, the result feels stagey and cramped, as though the film had been "adjusted for your TV set" before going to video. [13 Dec 1996]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  9. Light to the point of disposability, Sweet Home Alabama is a small screwball comic idea that spins out far too long.
  10. The Mosquito Coast is a work of consummate craftsmanship and it's spectacularly acted, down to the smallest roles (Martha Plimpton as a classically obstreperous preacher's daughter, for example), but its field of vision is as narrow and eventually as claustrophobic as Allie's. [28 Nov 1986]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  11. Dealing with such heavy matters as death, faith and forgiveness, the film wants to be a classic-in-the-making, but it just doesn’t hit the emotional and narrative cues necessary for such a weighty job.
  12. As for Vaughn, he seems exhausted by his strenuous efforts to bring a few sparks of spontaneity to such an overcalculated Christmas product.
  13. Rude, lewd and occasionally in the nude, The Hangover brings a collection of fresh faces to the familiar raucous male-bonding comedy.
  14. A story only slightly more complex than your average episode of "Friends."
  15. The emotional geometry is familiar enough to be credible yet odd enough to be creepy.
  16. Since "To pay or not to pay" is banal, the plot takes the popular path of excess to a brain-boggling twist (to be specific would be to ruin what fun there is), then spirals off in a series of ever more unlikely gyrations, until a heretofore decent picture has gone completely south into fantasy-land.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Alas, the perfect Steve Martin vehicle will probably never be the perfect film, no matter how endearing the silver-haired actor makes himself. And so it is with Father of the Bride; good, but by no means great. [20 Dec 1991, p.C3]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  17. The movie’s compromised tone, wavering between emo introspection and rom-com cuteness, is awkward in all the wrong ways.
  18. The Distinguished Gentleman isn't - distinguished, that is - but it's a notable cut above Eddie Murphy's recent ventures. [04 Dec 1992]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  19. A bad-cop, worse-cop movie.
  20. What a shame that The Spirit isn't nearly as good as it looks.
  21. Wants keenly to be hip and modern, but really it's just an old-fashioned drawing-room comedy.
  22. David Lynch's eye-popping imagery is buried under an avalanche of self-indulgence.
  23. With the two American actresses miscast, and the two young British lads behaving like a couple of "Brideshead Revisited" rejects, most of the dramatic heavy lifting is left to veteran English actor Wilkinson.
  24. As an actor, Kirk Douglas still has more to give; too bad he didn't have more to work with.
  25. The contrived script is stretched to the breaking point by Reiner's listless direction.

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