The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 3,924 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunrise
Lowest review score: 0 Far and Away
Score distribution:
3,924 movie reviews
  1. Far from the push-button catharsis offered by most Hollywood redemption tales, the work is sober and deliberate, a mix of visceral intensity and artful design.
  2. Easily among the top 10 films made last year.
  3. A preening terrorist for the Me generation, his primary drive was vanity and his main professional asset an absence of empathy.
  4. Estimates of the movie's costs range between $35-and $70-million; whatever the price, it was not too much to pay. As gods go, Superman is one of the godliest; his movie is one of the best.
  5. This is the master at the top of his form, his erratic genius harnessed and everything clicking, everything flowing, a fresh creation from a mature artist.
  6. Thrilling and beautifully crafted.
  7. "The Hurt Locker" may be getting all the attention and awards but The Messenger is at least as good and perhaps, given its delicate handling of a sensitive subject, even better.
  8. Detective Dee is the action flick of the year, a two-hour epic that blows the "Pirates of the Caribbean" to the Bermuda Triangle.
  9. Every once in a long while, the right director comes across the right project at just the right moment, and things so often discordant fall into perfect harmony.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Spare, steely, sexually explicit in a way that transcends mere provocation, Stranger by the Lake is vital cinema.
  10. What elevates Foy's impressive first feature (he also served as editor and composer of the dark, whimsical score) above, say, your average "unsolved mystery" TV episode, is the emotional connection he gradually builds between Duerr and the elusive creator of the Toynbee tiles.
  11. Legs flashing and eyes smouldering and brain scintillating, Fiorentino serves up each facet with venomous glee - it's a performance that mixes a main course of Bette Davis with a side order of La Femme Nikita, and it's mesmerizing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The exceptional story of a low-level diplomat who had a 20-year affair with a man he thought was a woman, is, in Cronenberg's hands, turned into a beguiling masterpiece on the question of self-deception. [01 Oct 1993]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  12. With elements of "A Star Is Born" and "Singing in the Rain," The Artist is a rarity, an ingenious crowd-pleaser.
  13. Observant and funny and thoughtful too, powered exclusively by vérité footage without a word of narration, Babies is William Blake’s Infant Joy brought to rich cinematic life.
  14. The story of a man afflicted with fearful visions, Take Shelter is a film that's hitting the right apocalyptic trumpet call at the right time.
  15. Chandor's shrewdest bit of business is figuring out how to make an A-list movie with a $3.5-million budget. Solution: buy low, sell high. Hire last decade's A-list – Spacey, Irons and Demi Moore – and give them their best parts in years.
  16. An unforgettable portrayal of the unglamorous gangster life, which is often short and never sweet.
  17. A classic... Edward Scissorhands is a sharp salute to the oddball in all of us.
  18. A masterpiece, but of a unique kind... A gorgeously filmed, supremely well-acted, intricately written film noir about now.
  19. Few directors working today make films with the grace and magisterial power of Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's best work.
  20. Poised, delicate, powerful, hovering between poignancy and pealing laughter, it is a feast formed by skill and serendipity.
  21. Le Havre, offers the director's usual humour, pitch-perfect acting and compassionate message, with a Gallic twist that should win new converts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    But Turteltaub surprises us. He has the kind of unerring comic touch - easily able to carry his audience from smart dialogue to heart-tugging emotion to something awfully close to slapstick - that should serve the movie world well.
  22. This is where the movie excels. In the classic neo-realist tradition, it's scant in plot yet rich in mood and character, offering us a revealing hint here, a poignant glimpse there, with each revelation filtered through Michelle Williams's superbly muted performance, all the more moving for being so restrained.
  23. This is like no movie you've seen before, a haunting mixture of horror, history and fantasy that works simultaneously on every level.
  24. You don't need to have seen a lot of art films to love The Diaries of Vaslav Nijinsky. All it takes is compassionate curiosity and perhaps some lingering memory of the world as a child experiences it.
  25. British humour at its eclectic best, a deliciously heady mix of dry wit and ribald farce.
  26. One caveat: At the risk of sounding sexist, let me say A Prophet is an unreservedly male film. Female characters are few and far between, and when they do appear, they pretty much fall into either one of two categories – les mamans ou les putains.
  27. Reservoir Dogs sizzles - it's dynamite on a short fuse, and you watch it with mesmerized fascination, simultaneously attracted and repelled by the explosion you know will come.

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