The Globe and Mail (Toronto)'s Scores

For 4,469 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 China Heavyweight
Lowest review score: 0 Extraction
Score distribution:
4469 movie reviews
  1. If you're looking for a screwball comedy about bipolar disorder -- and who among us is not? -- then this picture fits the bill fine. However, if you're picky enough to want a good screwball comedy about bipolar disorder, well, I'm afraid the wait continues.
  2. Watching this is a feature-length exercise in frustration - comedy that promises to be amusingly black stays uniformly grey; sentiment that looks to be credibly bittersweet winds up badly soured. We're constantly tantalized and perpetually disappointed, but don't despair - there's one terrific bonus...Toni Collette.
  3. It is, alas, très twee. A muchness of silliness. Beautifully filmed silliness, and fetchingly acted tweeness. But give me Cruella de Vil any time.
  4. Coming from a major director like Spike Lee, this is a colossal disappointment. And a surprising one.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Occasionally engaging but very chaotic movie.
  5. The movie’s compromised tone, wavering between emo introspection and rom-com cuteness, is awkward in all the wrong ways.
  6. The plot is rich, the execution poor.
  7. Despite its title, the movie admirably sticks to its game plan of ennobling the everyman as opposed to turning Papale into some kind of Superman.
  8. The result is a movie that's both odd and mediocre: not as bad as doing hard time, but not a particularly good time, either.
  9. Was it worth slogging through the nearly two hours of damned muddle to get to those last affecting moments? Not often in movies is the destination so much better than the journey.
  10. More entertaining in concept than execution. What starts as geek comedy gradually slides into a familiar morality play about the savagery beneath the veneer of civility.
  11. In Youth in Revolt , Cera bellies up to the same table once too often. His fresh-faced act is starting to look really stale.
  12. There's a big budget, big cast and big themes about religion, science and life on other planets. But Contact, which aims for awe, ends up with piffle.
  13. The wee mousie is fun, all right, yet like the occasionally ragged editing, the fun just gets haphazardly wedged in.
  14. Lewy’s script doesn’t cop out with any sentimental redemption, but neither does it establish why the self-destructive Lachlan deserves our sympathy.
  15. So it's a pretty faded experience. I suggest you get out the books, which for once can truly be said to be more spectacular than the movie.
  16. Of course, given the abundance of voice-over, Nic Cage is unburdened from any great need to act. But he narrates splendidly, delivering the stuff with an unrepentant glee laced with liberal doses of irony.
  17. In a kind of perverse alchemy, this film manages to turn that narrative gold into dross, and reduce the daunting perils of a 4,300-mile voyage to a ho-hum checklist. Welcome to the reverse magic of the movies.
  18. A glum meditation on isolation and romantic malaise.
  19. Unfortunately, the team led by producer Ron Howard and directed by Matthew O'Callaghan has jettisoned much of the charm of the original books along with that politically touchy storyline.
  20. This is the brand of sentimentality that comes with a high concentration of saccharine and every taste of bitterness safely removed.
  21. Although director Taylor Hackford ("An Officer and a Gentleman") handles the usually cumbersome flashbacks with impressive delicacy, he can't stop the narrative from sinking under its own melodramatic weight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As it glides along from one pretty picture to the next, Visitors starts to feel less like a singular artistic gesture than a compendium of quasi-experimental film clichés.
  22. The whole project labours towards an importance it never earns. In Beautiful Boy, the themes are vast but the picture is small, and the ensuing emptiness is what the characters are meant to feel – not us.
  23. Lives down to its title -- what an odd and gauzy reverie this is, a strangely muted picture that unfolds at a distinct remove from the reality around it.
  24. A lot more cutting would have made this movie much funnier – but it should have taken place in the editing room, not on the screen.
  25. Although Tom Stoppard's script lifts Ballard's spare dialogue directly from the page, the context in which it is placed is kitsch. [11 Dec 1987]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
  26. A comedy should provoke more than smiles. Should have characters instead of show-offs. Although often charming, Micmacs seems so pleased with itself that it hardly needs an audience.
  27. A successful hoax is annoying for everyone except the hoaxster. No one enjoys being the credulous, unsuspecting dupe of a wise---joke -- personally I loathe it.
  28. Typically, this sort of film is an earnest tear-jerker with moments of levity. Instead, what we have here is a raucous rib-tickler with occasional pauses for a little dramatic relief.

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