The Guardian's Scores

  • Music
For 3,323 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Same As You
Lowest review score: 10 Life In Cartoon Motion
Score distribution:
3,323 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the songs are still Lou Reed-shaped and John Cale-fashioned, this follow-up to the Grammy-nominated Walking With Thee sees the scouse experimentalists embracing a jagged kind of pop.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where Kurosky's fiercely sardonic lyrics were once couched in soaring trumpet lines and glorious powerpop hooks, now they bristle against grumbling electronics, sliding discordant chords and drunken, hazy horns.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Incomprehensible but irresistible.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's quite something - all the more given that he's now a one-man operation - and merits attention as much for its ludicrousness as anything.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exudes the kind of focus and cohesiveness most bands only achieve after years of playing together.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An enticing dip into melancholy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's more wit, atmosphere and incontestable (if elegantly understated) star power in this sleek, chic, foxy record than in the rest of the month's albums combined.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wagner's knack for inviting us into his personal life then quickly vacating remains strange and lovely.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a compact 38 minutes, Permission to Land is over before it gets irritating, leaving you with an impression of overwrought headache-rock fronted by a gale-force falsetto.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A gleefully non-conformist delight.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A collection of perfectly polished songs, beneath whose placid surfaces lurk all manner of questions, doubts and insights.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Easily the best of her extensive catalogue of covers albums.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vocally weaving and ducking, they drag up memories of Voice of the Beehive, or a Siamese version of Susannah Hoffs from the Bangles. What stops them becoming an annoying pop hydra is their unadorned directness and sharp pop hooks.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He sets tales of sexual double dealing and domestic violence to a sound somewhere between the two albums he made in 1986: the Americana of King Of America meeting the over-amplified rawness of Blood and Chocolate.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A step on from Up the Bracket, this album is a winningly idiosyncratic explosion of dizzy pop and punk fury that could yet be honed to perfection.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The first seven tracks are nearly flawless, and the occasional wobble thereafter doesn't mar one of the year's most scintillating debuts.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Luna still sound as if they could go on forever, making the same limited but lovely palette seem fresh.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If this record has a problem, it's that it may be too cute for its own good.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eyebrow-raising in print, they sound gripping here because of Andrews' glorious dagger-through-honey vocals, which combine with occasional strings and his band's raw passion to produce a corking debut.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is hardly user-friendly, but Bubblegum is too good an album to languish in the margins. There is something thrilling in its unpredictable lurches between darkness and light, noise and melody. In every sense, Bubblegum is a staggering record.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb may be unadventurous and melodramatic, but it is packed with disarming moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This new album picks up exactly where the Kings left off, with warm melodies and exquisitely detailed ruminations.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eighteen songs, is perhaps two too many, but a hint of over enthusiasm cannot mar what feels like a tour de force.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ignore the lyric booklet and you have one of the more impressive albums of 2004.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is how the Stone Roses' Second Coming could have - should have - sounded.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of these treatments verge on the visionary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    O
    Rice's personality and deft songwriting hoist him above the mass of bedsit mumblers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although Nasir Jones can't match arch-enemy Jay-Z's commercial firepower, he has accomplished one thing even Beyoncé's beau couldn't: a persuasive double album.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though it sags a bit over the course of 72 minutes, the effect is that of being sung to privately by a vocalist who has mastered the art of intimacy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The electronics of Gran Turismo has been supplanted by an organic sound with countryish overtones (see Live and Learn) that suits Persson's melancholy lyrics.