The Guardian's Scores

For 1,001 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Under the Skin
Lowest review score: 20 The Man with the Iron Fists
Score distribution:
1,001 movie reviews
  1. What an astonishing achievement; what a beautiful movie.
  2. Anomalisa is a movie with wit to burn (look out for the Sarah Brightman line and the meeting room pit) and enough incidental touches that the total achievement feels immense.
  3. Stark, visceral and unrelenting, 12 Years a Slave is not just a great film but a necessary one.
  4. The film thrums with an ongoing existential dread. And yet, tellingly, Cuaron's film contains a top-note of compassion that strays at times towards outright sentimentality.
  5. It is a creamily sensuous, richly observed piece of work, handsomely detailed and furnished: the clothes, the hair, the automobiles, the train carriages, the record players, the lipstick and the cigarettes are all superbly presented. The combination of all this is intoxicating in itself.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Telling a nearly three-hour story with an ending everyone knows, Bigelow and Boal have managed to craft one of the most intense and intellectually challenging films of the year.
  6. Before Midnight is intimate and intelligent, and also undemanding in the best possible way,
  7. What a glorious film this is, richly and immediately enjoyable, hitting its satisfying stride straight away. It's funny and visually immaculate; it combines domestic intimacy with an epic sweep and has a lyrical, mysterious quality that perfumes every scene, whether tragic or comic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Peedom and her team responded to disaster with a steady hand, in more than one sense, and fulfilled a rare opportunity to make a responsive documentary that is large, beautiful, captivating and exhibits deep respect for the people and environments it photographs.
  8. It hasn’t anything as genuinely emotionally devastating as Up, or the subtlety and inspired subversion of Monsters Inc. and the Toy Stories which it certainly resembles at various stages. But it is certainly a terrifically likeable, ebullient and seductive piece of entertainment, taken at full-throttle.
  9. The icy message may be that love is not a consolation as we face death. Rather the reverse. Love will give your death meaning, but make it no less unbearable.
  10. It is a brilliant, subversive account of class relations and the changing times.
  11. The film, with its transcendentally beautiful a rich and rewarding experience. [1 Sept. 2011]
  12. Brilliantly written, terrifically acted, superbly designed and shot; it's a sweet, sad, funny picture about the lost world of folk music which effortlessly immerses us in the period.
  13. It could be the finest hour for both of its lead actors.
  14. Leviathan is acted and directed with unflinching ambition, moving with deliberative slowness and periodically accelerating at moments of high drama and suspense. It isn't afraid of massive symbolic moments and operatic gestures.
  15. The Look of Silence — like The Act of Killing — is arresting and important film-making.
  16. Abderrahmane Sissako's passionate and visually beautiful film Timbuktu is a cry from the heart.
  17. Polley tackles painful issues with candour and tact. She has a gripping tale to tell. It's a film that raises questions about the ownership of memory and ownership of narrative.
  18. It is deeply intelligent, intensely and painfully political, and yet attempts, and succeeds, somehow to transcend politics and perhaps even history itself.
  19. Ida
    Every moment of Ida feels intensely personal. It is a small gem, tender and bleak, funny and sad, superbly photographed in luminous monochrome: a sort of neo-new wave movie with something of the classic Polish film school and something of Truffaut, but also deadpan flecks of Béla Tarr and Aki Kaurismäki.
  20. This movie may be too slow and verbose to be the next breakout horror hit, but its focus on themes over plot is what elevates it to something near greatness.
  21. Her
    I wished I liked it more. It is engagingly self-aware and excruciatingly self-conscious, wearing its hipness on its sleeve; it's ingenious and yet remarkably contrived. The film seems very new, but the sentimental ending is as old as the hills. There are some great moments.
  22. An unmissable, transcendentally beautiful classic. [28 Aug. 1998]
  23. By any standards, this would be an outstanding film, but for a debut it is remarkable.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a testament to Petzold’s sane head, steady hand and effortless storytelling skill that implausible plot-points are smuggled past us in their own blood-soaked bandages.
  24. Funny, oddly affecting and cherishably personal.
  25. This Is Not a Film is a compelling personal document, a quietly passionate statement of artistic intent, and an uncompromising testament to his belief in cinema.
  26. It is an intriguing confection of a movie, announcing its influences candidly, but exerting its originality too.
  27. It is a gut-churning film: and a radical dive into history, grabbing the past in a way a conventional documentary would not.

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