The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 4,935 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Invisible Woman
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
4,935 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What "Winged Migration" did for birds, Oceans does for all sorts of strange sea creatures in an ambitious, impressively filmed documentary.
  1. The performances are excellent all around, with Scott mesmerizing as the emotionally volatile Laevsky and the gorgeous Glascott making vividly clear why her character drives all the surrounding men to distraction.
  2. Very funny and a bit sentimental, it's naturalistic comedy of the highest order, with Evets and Henshaw standouts among a terrific cast.
  3. Salt moves ever forward -- pushing, pushing, pushing its heroine to greater feats every minute. It doesn't stop for martinis, either shaken or stirred, or any other detours. The movie is lean and muscular, looking for action even in situations where a little sleight of hand might have done the trick.
  4. In a summer of remakes, reboots and sequels comes Inception, easily the most original movie idea in ages.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes "Ecstasy" essential viewing for any pop-music fan and any student of celebrity pathology is the interview itself. Spector, despite his immodest comparisons of himself to Bach, da Vinci and Galileo, is surprisingly entertaining company, not simply the mad recluse with crazy hair that was his shocking image during the trials.
  5. By keeping his (Daly) focus on the two remarkable youngsters without an ounce of sentimentality he succeeds in making something true and satisfying.
  6. "Dream" brings together so much history, sheer adventure and terrifying moments.
  7. Taut, superbly executed and consistently engrossing, The Disappearance of Alice Creed marks an auspicious feature debut for writer-director J Blakeson.
  8. Noir never has been this dark.
  9. A satisfying comic gem.
  10. That rare sequel that took its time -- 23 years -- so it not only advances a story but also has something new to say.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Most impressively, it makes it understandable to those of us who don't know much at all about economics.
  11. It is a tremendous achievement that shines a light on the way many countries use criminals to further their domestic and international goals. Politically informative, it also offers great drama with excitement and suspense, and no little tragedy.
  12. All of the key creative personnel contribute to the movie's nail-biting tension and unexpectedly moving finale. Jon Harris's editing is matchless, and Rahman's score effectively heightens the emotion. Ultimately, however, it is the talents of Boyle and Franco that sock this movie home.
  13. A fiendishly entertaining Christmas yarn rooted in Northern European legend and lore, complete with a not-so-jolly old St. Nick informed more by the Brothers Grimm than Norman Rockwell.
  14. The best blue collar action movie in who knows how long, this tense, narrowly focused thriller about a runaway freight train has a lean and pure simplicity to it that is satisfying in and of itself.
  15. Biutiful has a strong, linear narrative drive. Nevertheless, and most of all, it's a gorgeous, melancholy tone poem about love, fatherhood and guilt.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Chen's direction is his most staid yet, but the riveting story speaks for itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Most exceptional is the visual style, which makes even the best animated 3D look like a poor cousin.
  16. The cinematography and editing are as superb as the film's feline stars are photogenic and heroic.
  17. Although the film runs more than two hours, the story is so compelling and the production so beautifully controlled that we are gripped by the characters' quest right up to the shocking end of the story.
  18. To call this movie fascinating is akin to calling the Grand Canyon large.
  19. Darius Khondji's cinematography evokes to the hilt the gorgeously inviting Paris of so many people's imaginations (while conveniently ignoring the rest), and the film has the concision and snappy pace of Allen's best work.
  20. Brandishing an ambition it's likely no film, including this one, could entirely fulfill, The Tree of Life is nonetheless a singular work, an impressionistic metaphysical inquiry into mankind's place in the grand scheme of things that releases waves of insights amid its narrative imprecisions.
  21. It all moves along briskly, with a degree of visual grace and a solid feel for 3D.
  22. All the movie's playfulness rubs off on the actors. Scenes crackle with life. The chemistry among all the actors is terrific.
  23. The best science fiction tells stories about people in extraordinary environments or situations that serve to open up the vast, still largely unexplored terrain of the human heart. Mike Cahill's Another Earth is science fiction at its best.
  24. The movie gathers momentum with a steady, assured pace, accumulating incidents, characters, secrets and lies until the rush of events is absolutely transfixing. Cinema can sometimes rival the novel in compulsive intensity and Sarah's Key is one such example.
  25. A handsome and achingly sad period piece, a finely observed portrait of cast-aside dreams. The drama is quieter and more chaste than the similarly themed "Camille Claudel," but no less haunting.

Top Trailers